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CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



1894 




BOSTON: 

A. L. WiNSHip & Co., Printers. 

1895. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1894. 



MAYOR. 
WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, 

188 Central street. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

John Andrews, President, 



Isaiah H. Wiley 
Lewis Stockbridge 



Franklin J. Ha:\iblin 
Fred W. Gilbert 



WARD ONE. 



ward two. 



54 Mt. Vernon street 
. 33 Pinckney street 



30 Walnut street 
lOJ. School street 



John Andrews 
Calvin H. Whitney 



WARD three. 



34 Albion street 

68 Gilbert street 



Franklin F. Phillips 
Edmund S. Sparrow 



ward four. 



211 Holland street 
18 Meacham street 



CLERK. 

George I. Vincent 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



Frank W. Kaan, President. 



WARD ONE. 



Wilfred B. Rich 
Albert C. Fairbanks 
L. Herbert Huntley 
JosiAH N. Pratt 



13 Franklin street 

10 Union street 

1 Pearl street 

33 Franklin street 



ward two. 



George B. Clarke . 
Arthur W. Haynes 
Frank W. Kaan 
Frederick W. Parker 



31 Berkeley street 

11 Parker street 

12 Pleasant avenue 

65 Boston street 



ward three. 



Leonard B. Chandler 
G. Franklin Wilkins 
George H. Russ 
Herbert L. Clark 



45 Jaques street 

98 Central street 

. 28 Montrose street 

124 Sycamore street 



ward four. 



Frederick A. P. Fiske 
Benjamin J. Downs 
William H. Berry . 
G. Leslie Nichols . 



52 Cherry street 

5 Clare mon street 

75 Harris street 

20 Chapel street 



CLERK. 

Charles S. Robertson. 



CITY GOVERXMEXT AND OFFICERS FOR 1894. 5 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Stockbridge, Phillips ; Councilmen Clarke 
(Ward 2), Nichols, Pratt. 

City Engineering. — Aldermen Gilbert, Phillips ; Councilmen 
Downs, Chandler, Fairbanks. 

Claims. — His Honor the Mayor ; Alderman Hamblin ; the Presi- 
dent of the Common Council ; Councilmen Rich, Fiske. 

Finance. — His Honor the Mayor; Aldermen PhiUips, Stock- 
bridge ; the President of the Common Council ; Councilmen Fiske, 
Rich, Nichols, Clark (Ward 3). 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Hamblin, Wiley; Councilmen 
Wilkins, Huntley, Berry. 

Fuel and Street Lights. — Aldermen Wiley, Gilbert; Council- 
men Haynes, Chandler, Berry. 

Highways. — Aldermen Gilbert, Whitney; Councilmen Clarke 
(Ward 2), Downs, Fairbanks. 

Legislative Matters. — His Honor the Mayor ; Alderman Whit- 
ney; the President of the Common Council; Councilmen Russ, 
Nichols. 

Ordinances. — Aldermen Phillips, Hamblin ; Councilmen Russ, 
Fiske, Rich. 

Printing. — Aldermen Whitney, Stockbridge ; Councilmen Clark 
(Ward 3), Fairbanks, Parker. 

Public Grounds. — Aldermen Sparrow, Whitney ; Councilmen 
Chandler, Haynes, Huntley. 

Public Property. — Aldermen Andrews, Sparrow; Councilmen 
Russ, Pratt, Parker. 

Soldiers' Relief. — Aldermen Andrews, Wiley; Councilmen 
Clarke (Ward 2), Berry, Huntley. 

Water. — Aldermen Sparrow, Stockbridge; the President of the 
Common Council ; Councilmen Downs, Wilkins. 



/■ 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Elec'J'IONs. — Aldermen Wiley, Andrews, Hamblin. 

Enrolled Ordinances. — Aldermen Sparrow, Gilbert, Andrews. 

Licenses. — Aldermen Stockbridge, Gilbert, Sparrow. 

Police. — His Honor the Mayor; Aldermen Andrews, Wiley. 

Sewers. — Aldermen Phillips, Hamblin, Andrews. 

State Aid.- — Aldermen Wiley, Gilbert, Whitney, Phillips. 

Special Building Permits. — Aldermen Gilbert, Hamblin. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elections and Returns. — Councilmen Pratt, Parker, Clark 
(Ward 3). 

Enrolled Ordinances and Resolutions. — Councilmen Haynes, 
Nichols, Wilkins. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
William H. Hodgkins, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 

Frank W. Kaan, President of the Common Council, ex officio. 

(Term, three years.) 

WARD one. 

S. Newton Cutler (elected 1891). 

Sanford Hanscom, M. D. (elected 1893). 

George S. Poole (elected 1892). 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1894. 



WARD IWO. 



Thomas M. Durell, M. D. (elected 1893), 

Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D. (elected 1891) 

Herbert A. Chapin (elected 1892). 



WARD THREE. 



NoR^iAN W. Bingham (elected 1891). 

QuiNCY E. DicKERMAN (elected 1892). 

Thomas S. Wentworth (elected 1893). 



WARD FOUR. 



Giles W. Bryant, M. D. (elected 1892). 

Martin W. Carr (elected 1893). 

Benjamin G. Brown (elected 1891). 

Gordon A. Southworth, Superintende7it and Secretary. 



ASSESSORS. 

(Term, three years.) 

Benjamin F. Thompson, Chaii-man (term expires 1896; 

Sa.aiuel T. Richards (term expires 1895). 

Nathan H. Reed (term expires 1897). 

Clerk of Assessors, Albert B. Tales. 



ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 
(Term, one year.) 

^^'ARD ONE. 

Fred. B. Clapp. 

WARD TWO. 

Charles C. Farrington. 



annual reports. 

ward three. 
Edgar T. Mayhew. 

WARD four. 

Harry A True. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 
(Term: City Physician, three years ; other members, two years.) 

Thomas M. Durell, M. D., Chairman (term expires 1895). 

Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D., City Physician (term expires 1895). 

Alvano T. Nickerson (term expires 1896). 

Clerk ^ William P. Mitchell. 

Inspector, Caleb A. Page. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Office, Police Building, Bow street. 

Williaim H. Hodgkins, Mayor, Chahmaii, ex officio. 
(Term, four years.) 

Edward B. West (term expires 1895). 

James G. Hinckley (term expires 1896). 

Albert W. Edmands (term expires 1897). 

Herbert E. Merrill (term expires 1898). 

Agent, Charles C. Folsom. 

Secretary, Cora F. Lewis. 



CUT GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1894. 

SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 

Office, Prospect street, corner Somerviile avenue. 
(Term, three years.) 

George D. Wemvss, Preside7it (term expires 1897). 
5 Austin street. 

George A. Kimball (term expires 1895). 
5 Munroe street. 

William Franklin Hall (term expires 1896). 
345 Broadway. 

Nathaniel Dennett, Supt. Water Works. 

Fr-\nk E. Merrill, Clerk. 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS. 

(Term : City Clerk, one year ; other members, three years.) 

Cromwell G. Rowell, Chairman (term expires 1897). 

Charles P. Lincoln (term expires 1895). 

Charles E. Parks (term expires 1896). 

George I. Vincent, City Clerk. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

(Term, three years.) 

Charles S. Lesxoln, Chairtnan (term expires 1897). 

Charles A. West (term expires 1895). 



10 ANNUM. REPORTS. 

James E. Whitaker (term expires 1896). 

John B. Viall (term expires 1896). 

J. Henry Flitner (term expires 1895). 

Christopher E. Rymes (term expires 1897) 

Elijah C. Clark (term expires 1897). 

Charles H. Brown (term expires 1897). 

J. Frank Wellington (term expires 1896). 

John S. Hayes, Secretary and Librarian. 



CITY CLERK AND CLERK OF BOARD, OF ALDERMEN. 

George I. Vincent. 



CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

John F. Cole. 



MESSENGER TO CITY COUNCIL. 

Jairus Mann. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Selwyn Z. Bowiman. 



CITY AUDITOR. 

Charles S. Robertson. 



CITY GOVERXMEXl AXD OFFICERS FOR 1804. 11 

CITY ENGINEER. 
HoR-iCE L. Eatox. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 
Thomas H. Ea.mes. 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS AND SUPERINTENDENT OF 
PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Thomas R. Roulstone. 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 
Melmlle C. Parkhurst. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
Tames R. Hopkins. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS. 
Leightox W. ^NIaxxixg. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 
Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D. 



INSPECTOR OF MILK AND VINEGAR. 

Tho^ias Cuxnixgham. 



12 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND PROVISIONS. 

Thomas Cunningham. 



CLERK OF COMMITTEES. 

WiLLiA]\i P. Mitchell. 



CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 

Albert B. Fales. 



Suitable Persons to Cause to be Properly Interred the Bodies of Hon- 
orably Discharged Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines, 
Under Chapter 395, Acts of 1889. 

Jesse J. Underhill. 

James F. Davlin. 



Jairus Mann. 
Robert R. Perry. 
Charles C. Folsom. 
Edward McGarr. 



CONSTABLES. 

William D. Hayden. 
Joseph J. Giles. 
Dennis Kelley. 
Charles L. Ellis. 



Christopher C. Cavanagh. 
Eugene A. Carter. 
Patrick J. Garvin. 



Clarence Tucker. 
George H. Carleton. 
Joseph W. Currant. 



FIELD DRIVERS. 



Christopher C. Cavanagh. 
George H. Carleton. 
John E. Fuller. 
Jacob W. Skinner. 



Charles S. Thrasher. 
George W. Bean. 
John G. Knight. 
Theodore E. Heron. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1894. 13 

FENCE VIEWERS. 

Lambert M. xMaynard. Ammiel Colman. 



POUND KEEPER. 

(Office vacant.) 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 
Ammiel Colman, 34 Marshall street. 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK. 
Samuel T, Liitlefield. 



MEASURER OF GRAIN. 
John Craig. 



PUBLIC WEIGHER IN CHARGE OF CITY SCALES, UNION 

SQUARE. 

Fulton O'Brion. 



WEIGHERS OF COAL. 

John Craig. D. Warner Danfortk. 

George K. Walcott. Thaddeus Harrington. 

Charles H. Tucker. Clinton E. Somes. 

George E. Slack. Edward L. Dunning. 

George E. Xewcomb. William I. Newcomb. 



14 



ANNUAL REPOR'IS. 



WEIGHERS OF BEEF. 



D. Warner Dankorth. 
Charles H. Tucker. 
Frederick A. CiEiUNc. 

C I -ARENCE E 1 )\VAR1 )S. 



Thaddeus Harrincton. 
Geor(;e K. Walcott. 
George E. Slack. 
Clinton E. Somes. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Melville C. Parkhurst, Chief. 



Robert R. Perry, Captain. 

Chris. C. Cavanagh, Sergeant. 

Eugene A. Carter, Sergeant. 

John E. Fuller. 

Albion L. Staples. 

JuDSON W. Oliver. 

George W. Bean. 

George L. Smith. 

Edward M. Carter. 

John F. Johnson. 

Edward E. Ha^niblen. 

Charles E. Wood:\ian. 

Arthur E. Keating. 

Stephen S. Smith. 

Eugene H. Ga.mmon. 

Ir-a. S. Carlton. 

Charles W. Stevens. 

Ulysses G. Skinner. 

James J. Pollard. 

Melville C. Parkhurst, 



Edward McGarr, Sergeant. 
Dennis Kelley, Sergeant. 
Phineas W. Skinner. 
Samuel A. Brown. 
John Hafford. 
George A. Bodge. 
George H. Carleton. 
Hubert H. Miller. 
Francis A. Perkins. 
Charles S. Thrasher. 
William H. Johnston. 
John G. Knight. 
Theodore E. Heron. 
Jacob W. Skinner. 
David A. Bolton. 
James M. Harmon. 
Michael T. Kennedy. 
Ezra A. Dodge. 
Daniel G. Simons. 

Lockup Keeper. 



MAYOR'S INAUGURAL ADDRESSES. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Convention of the City Council, \ 
January i, 1S94. j 

Resolved : That His Honor the Mayor, be, and he is hereby requested 
to furnish the Committee on Printing with a copy of his inaugural address for 
publication. 

Read twice and adopted. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Convention of the City Council, \ 
January 7, 1895. / 

Resolved : That His Honor the Mayor, be, and he is hereby requested 
to furnish the Committee on Printing with a copy of his inaugural address for 
publication. 

Read twice and adopted. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



DELIVERED BY 



Hon. WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, 

JANUARY I, 1894. 



Gentlemen of the City Council : — 

It is a cause of congratulation that we enter upon our public 
duties upon the first day of the New Year. I cordially greet you, 
with the sincere wish that it may be to each of us a " Happy New 
Year." The past has carried its record to the Judge of all the earth, 
and as our feet touch the boundary of another year, we have suppli- 
cated His blessing to rest upon us and direct all our actions. 

In accordance with the terms of the city charter we have sub- 
scribed to the oath of ofifice, and have called Almighty God to wit- 
ness that we will faithfully perform the duties which our fellow-citi- 
zens have elected us to discharge. 

Appearing for the third time in compliance with the expressed 
wishes of my fellow-citizens to assume the obligations and responsi- 
bilities of this high office, I desire to return my sincere thanks for 
the honor conferred upon me, and for the warm and generous 
appreciation of my humble efforts to conduct public affairs for the 



18 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



best interest of the city. I accept it, also, as an endorsement of the 
views I have expressed as to the general policy to be pursued with 
reference to the welfare of Somerville in all that will tend to develop 
municipal prosperity and a lofty public spirit. With each succeed- 
ing year the burden of responsibility is more weighty ; and I approach 
this year's duty feeling more than ever my own weakness, yet relying 
upon the promise of strength and wisdom from our Father in Heaven, 
who will never forsake or suffer to be misguided any who put their 
trust in Him. 

FINANCES. 

The funded debt of the city January 1st, 1893, was as follows : — 
Funded Debt, City Loan .... $676,000 



Funded Debt, Sewer Loan 
Funded Debt, Paving Loan 
Funded Debt, Water Loan 

Total Funded Debt 



43,000 
100,000 
375,500 

$1,194,500 



The debt was increased during the year by appropriations made 
by the City Council as follows : — 

Estate of the First Congregational 

Society, Central Hill . . $45,000 

Fire Department, steam fire engine . 3,000 
Fire Department, land on Highland 

avenue ..... 3,000 

Highways, paving Washington street . 24,000 

Nathan Tufts Park .... 10,000 

Schoolhouse (Glines) in Ward Three 1,500 
Schoolhouse in Ward Four, south side 

of Fitchburg R. R. . . . 15,000 

Schoolhouse, English High . . 80,000 

Schoolhouse, Edgerly addition . . 3,500 

Schoolhouse, Bingham addition. . 10,000 

Sewers, construction . . . . 10,000 

Renewals of Funded Debt . . 17,000 



Total amount of increase 



$222,000 



mayor's inaugural address of 1894. 19 

The debt was reduced during the year by payments as follows : — 

Funded Debt, City Loan . . . S115,000 
Funded Debt, Paving Loan . . 5,000 

Funded Debt, Water Loan . . 17,000 



Total amount of reduction . $137,000 

Leaving the Funded Debt of the city January 

1st, 1894 . • 81,279,500 

(An increase of $85,000 over the previous year) classified as fol- 
lows : — 

City Loan Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. $351,000 

" '< '' " '' " 4J percent. 257,000 

u ci u u u li 5 a 165,000 

" " Paving Bonds bearing interest at 4 

per cent. ....... 95,000 

City Loan Sewer Bonds bearing interest at 4J 

per cent 18,000 

City Loan Sewer Bonds bearing interest at 5 

per cent 35,000 

Water Loan Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. 254,000 

" " " " '• '' 5 " 94,500 

u a u u u cc 5^ « 10,000 



Total Funded Debt January 1st, 1894 . 81,279,500 

The above represents the net indebtedness of the city, the un- 
funded liabilities, for temporary loans, etc., being equalled by its 
assets, which consist of uncollected taxes, sewer and sidewalk 
assessments, etc. 

To provide for the payment of the current expenses, State and 
County taxes and debt requirements for the past year, the annual tax 
levy was made as follows : — 

Real estate, valuation ..... 838,538,700 
Personal property, valuation . . . 3,334,900 



Total valuation 841,873,600 



20 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



A rate of $15.50 on $1,000 valuation, with 
13,423 polls at $2 each, gives the total 
amount of the tax levy . 



$675,886.80 



The appropriations provided for by 

Fire Department 

Police .... 

PoHce Station Incidentals . 

Health Department . 

Highways 

Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 

Interest .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Public Grounds 

Public Library 

Printing and Stationery 

Reduction of Funded Debt 

Relief and Burial of Indigent 
Soldiers and Sailors . 

Salaries .... 

School Contingent, Janitors' Sal- 
aries 

School Contingent . 

School Fuel 

Schoolhouse Incidentals . 

School Teachers' Salaries . 

Sewers, Maintenance 

Sidewalks 

Street Lights . 

Support of Poor 

Watering Streets 



the tax levy were as follows 

$ 41,000.00 
25,000.00 

3,500.00 

12,000.00 

60,000.00 

500.00 

55,000.00 

7,000.00 

7,500.00 

5,500.00 

6,000.00 



75,000.00 



3,500.00 
34,000.00 

10,000.00 
16,000.00 

8,000.00 

12,000.00 

125,000.00 

7,000.00 
10,000.00 
42,000.00 
14,000,00 

6,000.00 



For current exjoenses .... 

State of Massachusetts, State tax . 

State of Massachusetts, Metropolitan Sewer 
assessment ...... 

Amount carried forward 



$585,500.00 
39,225.00 



7,996.50 
S632,721.50 



mayor's inaugural address of 1894. 21 

Amount brought forward . . . §632,721.50 

State of Massachusetts, Non-resident bank 

stock 819.95 

County of Middlesex, County tax . . 32,029.82 

Overlay and Abatement, for the sum added 

for fractional divisions and abatements . 10,315.53 



Total amount of appropriations provided 

for by the tax levy .... 8675,886.80 

In addition to the above, the following appropriations were made 
from the various income accounts, viz. : — 

Police, the amount received of the State for cor- 
poration and bank taxes . . . 817,108.43 

Public Library, the amount received of the 

County for dog licenses . . . 3,655.64 

Water Maintenance, from the income of the 

water works 25,000.00 

Water Works, construction of the water works 35,000.00 

Water Loan Interest, balance of income of 

the water works ..... 16,285.00 

Reduction of Funded Debt .... 2,174.73 



Total amount of appropriations for the 

year 8775,110.60 

A careful examination of the various accounts before the books 
can be closed for the year, warrants the statement that the total ex- 
penditures will be within the amount appropriated. 



22 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The usual tables, giving a condensed history of the city's finances, 
are herewith presented for comparison and reference : — 



Year. 


Amount of 
Funded Debt. 


Increase of 
Funded Debt. 


Reduction of 
Funded Debt. 


Tax Rate Per 

$1,000 Valuation 
on account of 
Reduction of 
Funded Debt. 


Town 


$ 593,349 

643,354 

809,354 

1,419,854 

1,571,854 

1,606,854 

1,606,854 

1,596,854 

1,585,000 

1,585,000 

1,585,000 

1,585,000 

1,585,000 

1,585,000 

*1, 525,000 

1,525,000 

1,525,000 

*860,500 

952,500 

1,057,500 

1,045,500 

1,194,500 

1,279,500 








Dec -^1 1S79 


$ 50,005 

166,000 

610,500 

152,000 

45,000 

10,000 








' 1873 
' 1874 

1875 
' 1870 

1877 
' 1878 
' 1879 
' 1880 
' 1881 
' 1882 
' 1883 
' 1884 
' " 1885 
' 1886 
' 1887 
' 1888 
' 1889 
' 1890 
' 1891 
' 1892 
' 1893 




















$ 55,130.62 
58,828.58 
61,004.64 
64,915.76 
55,739.35 
58,498.64 
61,390.59 
64,479.01 
67,719,33 
71,305.66 
66,894.23 
70,252.88 
37,000.00 
38,000.00 
45,000.00 
57,000.00 
104,000.00 
137,000.00 


$2.07 
2.30 
2 91 






3 42 






2 72 






2 59 






2.65 






2.70 






2.78 






2.87 






2 57 






2 56 




25,000 
130,000 
150,000 

45,000 
253,000 
222,000 


1.28 
1.27 
1.38 
1.55 
1.58 
1.79 



* Sinking Funds applied. 



JTear. 


Valuation. 


Tax Levy. 


Rate. 


1872 


^22,755,325 


#274,374.45 


$13.00 


1873 


29,643,100 


389,214.48 


12.80 


1874 


30,837,700 


473,235.50 


15.00 


1875 


31.317,000 


518,161.40 


16.20 


1876 


26,573400 


504,745.24 


18.60 


1877 


25,479,400 


471,789.14 


18.10 


1878 


20,976,900 


• 409,497.10 


19.00 


1879 


18,950,100 


352,553.80 


18.00 


1880 


20,458,100 


402,927.71 


19.10 


1881 


22,569,100 


452,945 45 


19.50 


1882 


23,162,200 


425,721.16 


17.80 


1883 


23,812,900 


411,645.43 


16.70 


1884 


24,331,100 


418,750.26 


16.60 


1885 


24,878,400 


428,605.44 


16.60 


1886 


26,003,200 


416,987.28 


15.40 


1887 


27,471,800 


424,309.14 


14.80 


1888 


28,765,400 


421,458.60 


14.00 


1889 


30,004,600 


440,324.40 


14.00 


1890 


32,557,500 


447,704.00 


14.00 


1891 


36,843,400 


539,137.10 


14.00 


1892 


38,093,100 


596,357.50 


15.00 


1893 


41,873,600 


675,886.80 


15.50 



mayor's inaugural address of 1894. 23 

Territorially, Somerville is one of the smallest cities of the State, 
two only — Chelsea and Everett — having less taxable acreage. The 
average taxable acreage of the cities of the Commonwealth is 10,457 ; 
Taunton, with 25,222 acres, being the largest, while Somerville num- 
bers less than 1,900 acres, Everett 1,816, and Chelsea, the smallest, 
has 961. The population of Taunton averages a little more than one 
to the acre; Chelsea, 31 ; Everett, 6J; and Somerville, with 25 per- 
sons per acre, has more dwellings to the acre than any city or town 
in the State, exceptmg Chelsea, and nearly as many as that city. The 
average tax rate in the 30 cities of the Commonwealth is $16.31, our 
tax being 81 cents below the average. The average tax rate of Som- 
erville since its incorporation as a city — a period of 22 years — has 
been ^16.08; last year, $15.50. The lowest was $12.80, m 1873; 
the highest, $19.50, in 1881. 

It seems almost unnecessary that I should at this time review at 
length the condition of the various departments of the city. Two 
thirds of last year's government, seven members of the new Board of 
Aldermen, and nine members of the Common Council returning with 
only a Sabbath's intermission from the duties and responsibilities of 
the last year's service, need not to be reminded of the various sub- 
jects which have been acted upon and completed, or have been, after 
more or less consideration, referred to this City Council. After one 
night's bivouac on the field of action, we open our eyes to behold the 
situation but slightly changed, with many of the same subjects still 
seeking or demanding solution. 

It gives me pleasure to record my appreciation of the faithful ser- 
vice of all the boards and heads of the city departments, the City 
Treasurer, City Clerk, City Solicitor, and all the employes at City 
Hall, without whose constant and efficient service, official life would 
be more difficult and burdensome than it now is. After many years 
of experience with many public officials, I can truly say that, in my 
opinion, no city in the Commonwealth has more honest, intelligent 
and loyal officials, and I take pleasure in thus publicly bearing witness 
to their worth. We begin the new year without incumbrance, with 
no unpaid bills, and with all the departments in excellent working 
condition. 

At this time I would impress upon your minds the wisdom of 
a careful scrutiny of all items of expenditure in the regular ap- 



24 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

propriations and the imperative necessity of "living within our 
means." 

I recommend to your careful consideration the proposition that 
the appropriations for the running expenses of the city to be raised 
under the twelve-dollar tax limit be levied upon the average valuation 
for the past three years, instead of upon the valuation of last year 
alone. The law permits either course, and last year, owing to the 
demand for increased expenditure, it was deemed best to avail our- 
selves of the privilege of levying the larger amount, viz. : upon the 
valuation of 1892, which admitted of an appropriation of $455,632. 
Then, again, certain very valuable estates were to be taxed for the first 
time, which, together with the increase of assessed values, increased 
the valuation to $41,873,600 —a gain of $3,780,500. 

This year the prospect of a corresponding increase of valuation is 
not as promising, and if the valuation of last year shall be made the 
basis, the tax rate will be likely to be increased. The basis of the 
average valuation for the past three years will afford an appropriation 
of $463,501, an increase of $7,869. In addition to this should be 
added a considerable sum brought forward from the account of 1892 
and paid from the appropriation of 1893. If this recommendation is 
carried into effect, the tax rate will not exceed $15 per thousand. 

The Inspector of Buildings reports that permits for the erection of 
482 buildings were issued during the last year. Although this is a 
slight reduction compared with the year 1892 — owing doubtless to 
the stringency of money during a portion of the year — it indicates a 
healthy and substantial growth of the city and adds about 2,500 to the 
population of the city, which is estimated to be nearly, if not quite^ 
50,000 souls. 

One year ago there were in use in the city three oil lamps, 276 
arc and fourteen incandescent lights. During the year there have 
been added forty-one arc and fourteen incandescent lights. Twenty- 
five incandescents have been discontinued, leaving the number at the 
present time 317 arc lights, three being placed on public grounds^ 
one on Central Hill and two on Broadway Park, 211 incandescent, 
and three oil lights. 



mayor's inaugural address of 1804. 25 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 

During ihe past year the action of the Highway Committee has 
been in strict accordance with the course pursued the year previous, 
and consequently a very large amount of work has been performed. 
The object has been the rebuilding of thoroughfares on a lasting basis 
and taking care of the new streets which have been opened so rapidly 
in the different sections of the city; also, the temporary repair of 
such main streets upon which the committees have been unable to 
make permanent improvements this year, but which under the general 
plan would receive early attention. The paving with granite blocks 
of Washington street between Union square and Medford street, which 
was recommended one year ago, has been accomplished, and that 
portion of the street which was one of the worst in the city is now in 
splendid condition. The most extensive piece of macadamizing 
undertaken has been in Ward One, oA Broadway ; the entire distance 
between the Boston line and Cross street has been brought to grade, 
changing the former dangerous grade in a portion of it ; a new foun- 
dation has been put in, and the whole covered with a wearing surface 
of Salem hard stone. Broadway, from the boundary to the top of 
Winter Hill, is now one of the finest streets in the vicinity. In Ward 
Four, Elm street, from Davis square to Willow avenue, has been rebuilt 
with Waltham hard stone. I recommend that the work of rebuilding 
this street in the same manner be continued to Somerville avenue 
during the present year. The calls for the building of new streets 
recently opened and built upon have been greater than ever before. 
In my opinion the committee has responded to these demands in every 
ward to the full extent of the appropriation, and each section has had 
its equal share of improvements. A large amount of sidewalk building 
has been accomplished, nearly 15,000 feet of edgestones and more 
than 13,000 square yards of brick sidewalks having been laid. 

The subject of enlarging the city stables, which was considered 
last year, and for which plans have been prepared and estimates pro- 
cured, is one that will require your early attention. The department 
is crippled for lack of horses and teams to do the necessary work, and 
is forced by lack of stable room to considerable expense in hiring 



26 , ANNUAL REPORTS. 

private teams. But the principal reason for the enlargement rests in 
the request of the Board of Health that the ashes of the city be col- 
lected by the Highway Department. The work can be done by this 
department more economically and to the entire satisfaction of the 
people. It is also expected that this department will soon be called 
upon to provide stable room for the more efficient collection of city 
offal. 

Arrangements for all this additional work have been provided for 
in the plans which were presented by the highway committee last 
summer. Owing to the stringent money market at that time the 
plans were not carried into effect. 

On thoroughfares bearing the heavy travel, the wisest economy 
requires that only the best material be used. It is a waste of money 
to use Somerville blue-stone, and the Highway Committee of this year 
will do well to consider this suggestion. Our main streets should be 
built to wear, and only the hardest material that can be obtained is 
suitable for this purpose. Pearl street and Medford street from Cross 
to Central streets are in need of immediate repairs, and should be so 
built. This year the West End Street Railway will relay their tracks 
on Highland avenue from Central street to Davis square. This portion 
of the avenue needs immediate repairs, and as the relaying of the 
tracks will necessitate more or less change of grade, I think the oppor- 
tunity of making a iirst-class road-bed with hard stone surface should 
be improved. The experience in paving during the last two years 
has been so successful as to lead me to recommend that the paving of 
Somerville avenue from Park street to the junction of Elm street should 
be undertaken this year, and as much of it completed as our finances 
will admit. This will provide a fine drive through Somerville to the 
Cambridge line, and by continuing through Elm street, as I have pre- 
viously indicated, will furnish a first-class highway through West Somer- 
ville to the top of Clarendon Hill. These suggestions, if carried into 
effect, will prove of great benefit to our city. I suggest that one or 
two picked men be detailed to look after and repair immediately, 
under the direction of the Superintendent of Streets, any defects which 
may exist in our principal streets. This plan has been successfully 
carried out in Newton and other cities. 

I cannot close this portion of my address without bearing witness 
to the great ability and faithfulness of the late chairman of the high- 



mayor's inaugural address of 1894. 27 

way committee, Ex-Alderman William L. Barber. In his connection 
with this department he has manifested traits of character, a genius 
for hard work, and a capacity for carrying forward large enterprises 
to successful completion, which entitle him to the respect and confi- 
dence of all the citizens, as well as to those who have been associated 
with him in his difficult work. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The department consists of two steam fire engine companies, four 
hose companies, one ladder company, and a new steamer for reserve, 
which has been obtained during the last year by purchase and exchange 
of an old steamer worn out in service. The number of fire alarms 
during the year 1893 was 92 bell and 18 still alarms. The loss by 
fire, as near as can be ascertained, was 831,569.35, as against 867,852, 
a decrease of 836,282.65, or 53^ per cent. The insurance on this 
property was 8125,950. At each alarm the fire has been confined to 
the building in which it originated, and in no case has the building 
been destroyed. The department is in excellent condition. 

During the past year the needs of the department have been con- 
sidered. A lot of land near the corner of Cedar street and Highland 
avenue has been purchased for the uses of a ladder truck when a 
building shall be erected to receive it. Several orders relating to the 
erection of a building, and one sketch of a proposed building are in 
the files of papers referred to this City Council, and will soon come 
before you for consideration. One is to erect a central fire station, at 
an estimated cost of 820,000, on the West Somerville lot. The other 
IS to erect the same building on the Brastow Schoolhouse lot. That a 
central fire station is needed there can be no doubt. The exisrencies 
of the department require room as soon as it can be obtained. Early 
last year it was proposed to enlarge the present Steamer One house, 
but the project was not regarded with favor. Three city councils 
have declined to take action on the subject of enlargement. 

I referred to this matter one year ago at considerable length, and 
favored the erection of the central fire station on the Brastow School- 
house location. Another year of careful consideration of the subject 
has confirmed rather than changed the views I then expressed. I 
think that for all the purposes required of such a station this location 
is superior to any other mentioned. In all respects it has advantages. 



28 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

If the station is erected upon this site, it will furnish headquarters for 
the fire department and a central location for the chemical engine and 
fire-alarm system. In that event, a smaller and less expensive build- 
ing can be erected for the ladder truck in West ,Somerville. I believe 
that public sentiment is in accord with this recommendation, and I 
submit the subject to your careful consideration. 

The Superintendent of Electric Lines and Lights recommends that 
a wagon be procured for carrying tools and materials necessary for 
repairing breaks, or for general work on fire-alarm and police wires, 
and for dispatch in reaching places of accident. Owing to the large 
increase of electric wires by electric lighting. West End Street Railway 
trolley and numerous telephone and telegraph lines, the liability of 
broken wires and the danger to the public incurred thereby is greatly 
increased. This wagon should be kept at the headquarters of the fire- 
alarm system. He also suggests that a striker be put on Clarendon 
Hill, at the Lincoln Schoolhouse, to notify the children in that part 
of the city of " no school " and for fire-alarm purposes. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

It gives me pleasure to state that the Board of Overseers of the 
Poor fully realize the unusual demand which may be made upon them 
during the present winter, and are cognizant of the true condition and 
wants of any who have made known their distress. It also affords 
gratification to state that owing to the general character of our citi- 
zens, and the continuance of active business in the city, the number 
of unemployed is not nearly as large, proportionately, as in many 
other cities. Still, doubtless, it is a fact that an unusual number may 
require assistance before the winter is over. Should such be the case, 
I am sure the good people of our city. will not murmur if the amount 
expended in public benefaction is larger than usual. The citizens of 
Somerville have never begrudged any amount, judiciously expended, 
to aid deserving applicants, and now, in addition to the means pro- 
vided by the city, the citizens are reorganizing charitable societies, 
and forming Associated Charities to carry forward private benevolent 
agencies designed to prevent pauperism and suffering. 

The number partially supported during the past year was 1,091, 
an increase of 168 over 1892; number fully supported 117, an in- 
crease of 11 over 1892, five of this increase being in the number 



mayor's inaugural address of 1894. 29 

of insane. The total expenditure of this department last year was 
$17,800.51, an increase of $785.21 over the previous year. The num- 
ber fully supported at the present time is 75, an increase of 10 over 
one year ago. Four of these are children. 

At its last regular meeting the Board of Overseers voted unani- 
mously to recommend to the City Council the purchase of a suitable 
site for the erection of a City Almshouse, in view of the fact that they 
have not been able to hire a house in accordance with authority given 
by last year's City Council, and inasmuch as available land of sufficient 
area can be better procured at the present time. 

I respectfully ask your consideration of this action of the Board 

of Overseers. 

SOMERVILLE HOSPITAL. 

Although this is a private and in no sense a public institution sup- 
ported by the city, it is one in which Somerville may well feel an 
honorable pride. Its completion engaged the last labors of the Hon. 
Charles G. Pope, my predecessor in the mayoralty, who departed this 
life on the 24th day of April last. He lived long enough to witness its 
completion, after long and faithful labor in perfecting its organization. 
It was dedicated on May 17, 1893, and was immediately occupied. 
Though the need of such an institution has long been recognized, 
yet such was not fully understood until the hospital had demonstrated 
it by its humane and noble work. Having no endowment or stated 
mcome, it relies for support principally upon the contributions of our 
benevolent citizens. Owing to the fact that it receives and maintains 
many who might otherwise be a charge upon the city, I trust the 
citizens will not be heedless to its calls for financial aid. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

No changes have occurred in this department during the year. 
The comparative freedom from crime which we have enjoyed is 
due in a large degree to the efficiency of the police force. The de- 
partment is well conducted and can be relied upon for a faithful 
discharge of duty. 

Owing to the large number of new streets, which necessitates 
longer routes, I think the force should be increased by the appoint- 
ment of three additional patrolmen. I recommend this action after 
frequent interviews with the Chief in relation to the efficiency of 



30 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

the force. I concur in his recommendation that the signal system 
be extended to provide for two more circuits and three additional 
boxes, and that a matron to take care of female prisoners be 
appointed. 

I renew in another form a recommendation made one year 
ago, in regard to retiring aged and faithful patrolmen, who have 
served fifteen or twenty years, and are unfitted for street duty by 
reason of age. Authority for this action must be granted by 
statute, and I recommend that the Mayor be authorized to petition 
the Legislature for the enactment of a law which shall confer this 
power upon the City Council. 

NATHAN TUFTS PARK. 

During the year two loans of $5,000 each have been made for 
the purpose of completing this park, and the amount of $10,000 
has been expended under the direction of the Committee on Public 
Grounds. Enough has been accomplished to comply with the 
terms of the deed of gift, and as soon as the weather will permit 
the necessary landscape gardening will be undertaken, lawns and 
walks laid out, tiees and shrubbery set out, and it is hoped that all 
necessary work will be finished in season to dedicate the park on 
the Fourth of July next, when, as I understand, our patriotic resi- 
dents of West Somerville propose to outdo the splendid celebration 
of the day last year. Truly, such an occasion should appeal to 
the patriotism of the entire city and afford a fine opportunity for its 
display. 

It will be necessary, and at an early day, to appropriate a 
sufficient sum for the completion of the park. 

STREET BOUNDS AND CITY SURVEY. 
I respectfully call your attention to the last annual report of 
the City Engineer, in which he submits the necessity of placing 
stone monuments or bounds at street intersections for the purpose 
of permanently establishing street lines and affording an indestructi- 
ble record of their location. I will not quote at length the para- 
graph to which I refer, but will recommend that the sum of $500 
be appropriated for that purpose. I also call your attention to his 
reference to the necessity of completing the city surv^ey, found on 



mayor's inaugural address of 1894. 31 

page 7 of this report, and approve his request for an appropriation 
of S500 to defray the expense. No appropriation for this purpose 
has been made since 1883. 

, SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 

In January last, the President of this Board, Albion A. Perry, 
Esq., whose term of service was about to expire, declined a reap- 
pointment, and the city was thus deprived of his valuable services. 
Mr. William F. Hall was appointed for the full term of three years. 
The following is a brief synopsis of the work of the Board during 
the past year : — 

Length of mains extended . . 8,031 feet 
Length of mains relaid . . . 16,305 feet 

making over 4 6-10 miles pipe put in. 
Number of services put in . . 372 
Number of feet of pipe . . . 13,432 (over 2 1-2 miles) 
Number of hydrants set ... 54 

Number of hydrants removed . 21 

Net increase in hydrants ... 33 

making total number now in city, 568 

of which 26 are private hydrants. 

A large district has been relaid with iron pipe in West Somer- 
ville, and Washington street from Medford street to L'nion square 
has also been relaid, together with many smaller streets. A new 
boiler has been erected at the pumping station, and scales have also 
been put in there for weighing coal, pipe, etc. The Board empha- 
sizes the necessity of relaying a large portion of the cement pipe 
now in the city as a matter of economy, and this should be done the 
coming year, in their opinion. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 
During the year a change in the office of superintendent has 
been made. Mr. C. E. Meleney has resigned and Mr. Gordon A. 
Southworth has succeeded him in that office. The latter needs no 
introduction to the citizens of Somerville. Occupying for twenty 
years the post of Principal of the Prescott School, he has become 



32 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

well known to us all. He brings to his office ripe experience as a 
teacher, business methods, and a devotion to his calling which will 
be beneficial to our public schools. The City Council of last year 
provided ways and means for the erection of an English High 
School, purchased the property of the Unitarian Society, to afford 
ample room for its location, and have made a contract for the 
erection of the building. The enlargement of the Bingham School 
is in progress and will be completed within four months, and an 
appropriation has been made for the erection of a schoolhouse on 
Kent street to accommodate children living south of the Fitchburg 
Railroad. The land for this purpose was purchased and plans of a 
building adopted, but owing to the fact that the English High 
School appropriation was inadequate to cover the contract for the 
erection of the building, it was decided late in the year to transfer 
a sufficient sum from the Kent Street School appropriation, with 
the understanding that the amount thus taken, and enough more to 
complete that building, should be appropriated as soon as possible 
this year. I therefore recommend that such action be taken at 
once, in order that this schoolhouse may be built early in the season, 
in accordance with the plans already adopted. 

At the final meeting of the School Board, held December 26, 
a report containing several recommendations was adopted. These 
will soon be presented to the City Council in the report of the 
Committee on Additional School Accommodation. In order to 
anticipate in point of time, I will here give you a brief statement 
of the principal recommendations : — 

1. The erection of a four-room building for primary schools 
in the northeasterly part of Ward One, on Broadway, between Mt. 
Vernon street and Benedict avenue, or on the vacant land adjoining 
the Prescott School on Myrtle street. 

2. If the Webster School had not been burned, there would 
have been no demand for additional school accommodations in 
Ward Two in 1894. Instead of rebuilding that schoolhouse it is 
proposed to enlarge the Knapp School by the addition of four 
rooms, which will provide adequate room for the scholars of both 
schools. 



mayor's inaugural address of 1894. 33 

3. The enlargement by the addition of eight rooms to the 
Burns School in Ward Four. This will relieve the overcrowded 
condition of four schools in that ward. The Burns School is about 
midway between the Morse and Highland Schools, in the centre 
of a growing district. It furnishes (in the opinion of the superin- 
tendent) just the needed nucleus for another grammar school centre, 
and its enlargement will relieve the Highland and Lincoln on one 
hand, and the Morse on the other. I commit these recommenda- 
tions of the Superintendent of Schools to your careful considera- 
tion. 

The average cost of education for each scholar in the public 
schools during 1893 was 823.68, a decrease of 25 cents per scholar 
compared with the previous year. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

During the year two changes have taken place in this depart- 
ment, caused by the declination of Mr. J. Frank Wellington to 
accept another appointment, and the resignation of Mr. Charles H. 
Crane, consequent upon his election to represent the city in the 
General Court. Both these gentlemen have served the city faithfully 
in a department which requires ability and patience, and devotion 
to the best interests of the city. The vacancies were filled by the 
appointment of T. M. Durell, M. D., and Ex- Alderman A. T. 
Nickerson. 

The Board has under consideration the problem of the proper 
disposition to be made of the city garbage, upon which it will report 
at a future date. 

CITY HALL. 

One year ago I referred to this subject, and the general im- 
provement of the Central Hill Park, and stated that the need of a 
new City Hall was beginning to be seriously felt. I was well 
aware of the inconvenience of transacting public business in such a 
building, but when outlining a plan for buildings on that public 
ground, I thought that the plan might be gradually consummated 
in a period of a few years. Now I believe that a new City Hall is 
imperatively demanded, and I do not hesitate to request your 
early and favorable consideration with a view to your speedy action 

(3) 



34 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

in procuring plans and estimates of the cost of such a building as 
the urgent necessities of the case demand. The present structure 
was erected in 1852. For twenty years it was used as a High 
School, afterwards as a Town House, and in 1872, upon the organi- 
zation of the City Government, became the City Hall, and has 
been used as such ever since. The building that was sufficient for 
city purposes in 1872 is entirely inadequate for such uses now. A 
city of 50,000 inhabitants has grown up around it, and it is no 
longer suited for the centre of the city's official and business activ- 
ities. Every department is pressed for room. The Board of Asses- 
sors, having frequent hearings and employing in summer an extra 
number of clerks, requiring much floor room, has no access to its 
office excepting through the room of the Clerk of Committees, who 
himself is in need of room. There is no office room whatever for 
the Superintendent of Streets, Electric Lines and Lights, or Health 
Department. The City Engineer says of his office accommoda- 
tions : " It has long been evident that the facilities for properly 
arranging plans, note-books, etc., in the department are entirely- 
inadequate to its needs. The office is small and poorly arranged 
for the number of men employed, and it is even necessary to locate 
some of the office help in another part of the City Hall, beyond the 
control of the engineer. The present arrangement for filing plans is 
so small, and the books and plans are so crowded, that it is only 
with extreme care that plans can be used without injury. The safe 
for plans and note-books is small, and its construction is such that 
if the building were destroyed by fire, the contents, if not entirely 
destroyed, would be of very little value. The loss of note-books 
and plans would be a severe one, and it would be impossible to 
replace them at any cost. The records of location and depths of 
sewer and water mains, the plans of highway locations, the surveys 
of streets, lands, and buildings, levels and grades for highways, 
and land plans of which no other copies can now be obtained, all 
would be destroyed." 

The same difficulty is experienced in nearly every department. 
There is not a room available for conversation and interview's. All 
business must be transacted in public rooms or hallways. The 
sanitary arrangements are entirely inadequate. There is but one 
retiring-room in the building, and that of a character excelled in 



mayor's inaugural address of 1894. 35 

almost every private dwelling having any claim to respectability. 
At the last meeting of 1893, a special committee appointed some 
months before to consider the advisability of providing more room 
in City Hall, and reporting a plan, after having had but few meet- 
ings with an interval of some months, submitted a recommendation 
that a wooden addition be built upon the School street end. Only 
a few months before the obnoxious wooden horse-sheds had been 
removed, as much on account of their dangerous proximity to the 
building as for any other cause, and now it is seriously proposed 
to add what might prove a tinder-box to this old building already 
considered unsafe in case of fire. I do not believe it wise policy to 
increase accommodations in that way or in any other, except in the 
erection of a new hall which shall fully answer the purposes for 
which it shall be erected and prove a source of pride to our 
citizens. In these days schoolhouses and public buildings are 
planned for the purpose of enlargement in the event of over- 
crowding, but any expenditure upon this building would, in 
my opinion, be money thrown away. Any wise business man 
or corporation plans buildings, mills and factories with some 
reference to future growth of business. It is an exercise of good 
judgment, in my opinion, for a city to provide building accommo- 
dations beyond the pressing needs of the present hour. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

During the year Miss Adams, who had been librarian from its 
organization, more than twenty years ago, resigned her position, 
and was succeeded by Mr. John S. Hayes, who had for fifteen 
years been Principal of the Forster School. He entered upon his 
active duties on the first day of July last. Under the direction of 
the trustees he has commenced preparations for the entire re- 
organization of the library, which will provide for a complete 
classification of the books and require considerable more room, 
especially for shelving, books in stack, a suitable room for the 
reference library, a room for students and others who use the library 
for study and research, and a room for the proper care of relics 
of the past. 

When the building was completed it was large enough for the 
library as it then existed, but the increase in population has de- 



36 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

manded an increased number of books, and books require room. 
Common prudence would suggest an addition to the stack room, with 
space for at least 60,000 volumes. The present delivery space is too 
small for the large numbers that come to the library for books. The 
reading-room should occupy much more space. These and other 
reasons suggest the need of more room. The subject is now being 
discussed in the local papers, '' not with an idea of finding out how 
pressing present needs may most easily be met, but with a compre- 
hensive view of the probable needs of the next generation, and with 
a purpose of doing work now so that it will not have to be done all 
over again a dozen years from now." This language so nearly 
expresses the spirit of the recommendations made one year ago, and 
which another year has convinced me to be correct, that I quote it 
with pleasure as indicative of the trend of public opinion toward the 
true and natural solution of the great problem of improvement in the 
public buildings. 

The location of the English High School will prevent any 
possibility of enlargement of the Public Library eastward. The 
only suitable method of obtaining additional room is to erect a 
buildino; westward toward School street. I believe that the Citv Hall 
should be erected further eastward, and a building for the use of the 
Public Library erected, joining the present library building and 
connected with it. This new building could serve as a public 
Memorial Hall and Public Library combined. The new building 
could be of the same general style of architecture and present a 
pleasing effect. The lower story could be utilized as a stack room 
and for other purposes of the library, and the present building fitted 
up, as the trustees suggest, for reading rooms, reference library, and 
rooms in which the student or investigator could pursue his researches 
without confusion or interruption. 

This plan for the improvement of Central Hill is feasible, and can 
be carried out. There are two ways of accomplishing it. One is to 
erect a new building each year from appropriations made on the 
funded debt account, to be paid for within a period of ten years ; 
the other is to follow the course pursued by Lowell and other cities 
which have felt the need of great public improvements — city halls, 
public library buildings, high schools, memorial halls and parks. 
Lowell, for instance, has just completed some of the finest public 



mayor's inaugural address of 1894. 37 

buildings in the State — a city hall, memorial and public library 
combined, and high school. Instead of building piecemeal, the city 
obtained authority from the Legislature to borrow the amounts 
required outside the debt limit, and for the term of thirty years. As 
the work of erecting these buildings was to require considerable time, 
and cover the period of several city governments, the construction was 
placed in the hands of a commission consisting of its leading citizens, 
and the grand work has been accomplished. These buildings, if we 
erect them, are to continue for more than one generation. They are 
to be used by those who shall follow us in a long succession of years. 
Our borrowing capacity should always remain as large as possible, in 
order to provide schoolhouses, engine houses, sewers, and other 
important matters, but the weight of a loan on long time would be 
comparatively light and be borne in a measure by those who are to 
receive its benefits. The Somerville avenue paving loan is an illustra- 
tion of this idea. Newton is to have its grand boulevards, Cambridge 
its splendid parks. Somerville, with the finest location in this section 
of the State for its public buildings, will one day have them. 

Gentlemen of the City Council : — 

There are many matters of public interest to which I have not 
referred. Much has been done which time will not permit me to 
speak of at length, and that has not been mentioned in print. Such 
matters as the removal of grade crossings, reduction of the price of 
gas and change of railroad locations have had the close attention of 
the City Solicitor and the Mayor, the former having attended all 
hearings in these cases in the interest of the citizens of Somerville. 
He has been faithful in all his works, and while a trumpet has not 
been sounded before him he has accomplished much which will bear 
fruit and be creditable to himself and the city. Let us determine 
here and now that we will be true to the interests of this dear city now 
committed to our care. The year stretches out before us. It will be 
crowded with labors and activities. May we so conduct the public 
business that at its close our fellow-citizens may gladly say to each, 
'•' Well done, good and faithful servant." 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



DEIJVERED KY 



Hon. WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, 

JANUARY 7, 189J. 



Gentlemen of the City Council : — 

For the third time in the history of Somerville the voters have 
elected a Mayor for the fourth consecutive term. Renewing my oath 
of office, it is fitting that I should acknowledge my deep sense of 
personal obligation to my fellow-citizens for the honor conferred upon 
me for the fourth time, indicating, as it does, the confidence reposed 
in me. I should be less than human did I not respond with expres- 
sions of sincere thankfulness that my public course has been such as 
to receive this testimonial of high esteem. 

But while a new honor has been added, I can but realize that 
another draught is to be made upon my strength and ability to per- 
form the duties of the high office. Experience has taught me that 
the position of Mayor of this growing city demands all the strength, 
and courage, and patience the incumbent possesses, and more than 
all else the sustaining grace and power of the Almighty. As I meet 
the cares and problems of another year, differing, in many respects. 



40 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

from those of former years, I must rely upon that power for any 
degree of success, and I exclaim, with one of old, " If Thy presence 
go not with me, carry us not up hence." 

We speak of Somerville as a growing city. Do we realize how 
rapidly it is growing, and what strides it is making? The population 
in 1872 was estimated to be 16,000; in 1880 it had increased to 
24,985 ; in 1885, to 29,922, an increase of twenty per cent. ; in 1890, 
to 40,152, an increase of thirty-three and one-third per cent.; in 
1894, or four years and five months, to 52,200, an increase of thirty 
per cent. The increase of 1894 over 1880 has been 108 per cent. 

The past year has been one of great activity in all the departments 
of the government. The building of the English High and George 
W. Durell Schools ; the enlargement of the Knapp and Bingham 
Schools ; and much other less important work upon the schools ; the 
erection and equipment of the central fire station and hook and 
ladder house on Highland avenue, together with providing apparatus 
and extending the fire-alarm system ; the large amount of work in the 
Highway Department, including the building of a new stable ; the 
extensive laying of sewers ; the reorganization of the Health Depart- 
ment ; the unusual amount of work performed by the Water Board ; 
the completion of the Nathan Tufts Park ; the extra labors of the 
Poor Department in behalf of the unemployed, and many minor 
events too numerous to be mentioned in a single paragraph, have 
fully occupied the attention of the various committees. The year 
1894 will be remembered by the members of its City Council and 
departments as one of hard work and little leisure. 

Much of this work has been caused by the very rapid growth of 
the city. The demand for additional public accommodations — 
schools, streets, and other necessities — is increasing yearly, and re- 
quires constant forethought and oversight to anticipate and provide 
for. Therefore, I recommend to your careful consideration the great 
economy of providing adequate accommodations in advance of their 
need. Something in this direction was done last year in securing the 
erection of the public buildings, but much more of the same kind of 
work must be done from year to year. The open ground of Somer- 
ville in every quarter is being rapidly covered with buildings to pro- 
vide homes for a class of worthy, industrious, and pubUc-spirited 
people, who will be imbued with our ideas, if these are far reaching 



:\iayor's inaugural address of 1895. 



41 



and for the well-being and permanent benefit of those who make this 
city their home. Somerville is destined to be a popular city, and there 
are some, perhaps many, sitting here who will see its population num- 
ber one hundred thousand. 

Following the usual custom on these occasions, I will first direct 
your attention to the financial condition of the city, which, I think, is 
of sufficient importance to justify more than passing notice. The 
voters have a right to know the exact condition of the fi.nances, that 
they may judge equitably as to the faithfulness of an administration in 
the discharge of its trust. 



STATEMENT OF FINANCES. 
The Funded Debt of the city January 1, 1894, was as follows : — 
Funded Debt, City Loan S773,000 



Funded Debt, Sewer Loan . 
Funded Debt, Paving Loan 
Funded Debt, Water Loan . 

Total Funded Debt 



53,000 

95,000 

358,500 



$1,279,500 



The debt was increased during the year by appropriations made 
by the City Council as follows : — 

Fire Department, central fire station . . S26,000 

Fire Department, central fire station, elec- 
trical apparatus, etc. .... 5,250 

Fire Department, chemical engine and equip- 
ments 3,000 

Fire Department, hook and ladder station . 10,000 

Fire Department, hook and ladder station, 

equipment and furniture . . . 3,750 

Fire Department, land for fire station. Ward 
One ... . 

Highways, city stable 



Nathan Tufts Park 

Public Library improvement 

Schoolhouse, Bingham addition 

Amount carried forward 



6,000 

14,500 

15,000 

3,000 

1,000 

$87,500 



42 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward 

Schoolhouse, Edgerly addition 

Schoolhouse, High and English High, heating 
ventilating and plumbing 

Schoolhouse, O. S. Knapp addition 

Schoolhouse, Ward Four, south side Fitch- 
burg Railroad .... 

Sewers, construction .... 

Total amount of increase 



$ 87,500 
2,000 

35,000 
15,500 

12,000 
20,000 

S172,000 



The debt was reduced during the year by payments as follows : — 

Funded Debt, City Loan .... $83,000 

Funded Debt, Sewer Loan .... 1,000 

Funded Debt, Paving Loan .... 5.000 

Funded Debt, Water Loan . . . ' . 18,000 



Total amount of reduction 



S107000 



Leaving the Funded Debt of the city January 1, 1895, $1,344,500 
(an increase of $65,000 over the previous year), classified as fol- 
lows : — 



City Loan Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. 
City Loan Bonds bearing interest at 4J per cent. . 
City Loan Bonds bearing interest at 5 per cent. . 
City Loan Sewer Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent 
City Loan Sewer Bonds bearing interest at 4J per cent 
City Loan Sewer Bonds bearing interest at 5 per cent. 
City Loan Paving Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent 
Water Loan Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. 
Water Loan Bonds bearing interest at 5 per cent. . 
Water Loan Bonds bearing interest at h\ per cent. 

Total Funded Debt January 1, 1895 



$444,000 

233,000 

165,000 

20,000 

17,000 

35,000 

90,000 

248,000 

82,500 

10,000 

$1,344,500 



The above represents the net indebtedness of the city, the un- 
funded liabilities, for temporary loans, etc., being equalled by its 
assets, which consist of uncollected taxes, sewer and sidewalk assess- 
ments, etc. 



mayor's IXAUGUR-A.L ADDRESS OF 1895. 



43 



To provide for the payment of the current expenses, State and 
County taxes and debt requirements for the past year, the annual tax 
lew was made as follows : — 



Real estate, valuation 
Personal property, valuation 
Total valuation . 



840,598,900 

3,544,000 

844,142,900 



A rate of 815.70 on 81,000 valuation, with 14,061 polls at 82 
each, gives the total amount of tax levy, §721,165.53. 



The appropriations provided for by the tax levy were as follows : — 

Fire Department 
Health Department 
Highways .... 



Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 

Interest .... 

Miscellaneous 

Police .... 

Police Station Incidentals 

Printing and Stationery . 

Public Grounds 

Public Library 

Reduction of Funded Debt 

Relief and Burial of Indigent Soldiers 

and Sailors 
Salaries . 

School Contingent 
School Contingent, 
School Fuel . 
Schoolhouse Incidentals . 
School Teachers' Salaries 
Sewers, Maintenance 
Sidewalks .... 
Street Lights .... 

Aino2int carried forward 



Janitors' Salaries 



$ 43,000.00 

12,000.00 

60,000.00 

500.00 

65,000.00 

6,600.00 

25,000.00 

3,500.00 

6,500.00 

4,500.00 

6,500.00 

100,000.00 

4,000.00 
35,400.00 
16,000.00 
11,000.00 

9,000.00 

12,000.00 

125,000.00 

7,000.00 
10,000.00 
44,000.00 

$606,500.00 



4:4 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward . . $606,500.00 

Support of Poor 15,000.00 

Waterinor Streets 7,000.00 



For current expenses ..... $628,500.00 

State of Massachusetts, State tax . . . . 31,380.00 

State of Massachusetts, Metropolitan Sewer assmt. 22,230.79 

State of Massachusetts, Non-resident Bank stock 847.80 

County of Middlesex, County tax . ... 34,317.59 

Overlay and Abatement, added for fractional divi- 
sions and abatement ..... 3,889.35 



Total amount of appropriations provided for by 

the tax levy ...... $721,165.53 

In addition to the above, the following appropria- 
tions were made from the various income accounts, 
viz. : — 

Police, the amount received of the State for corpo- 
ration and bank taxes ..... 22,225.59 

Public Library, the amount received of the County 

for dog licenses . . . . . . 2,710.90 

Water Maintenance, from the income of the water 

works ■ 32,500.00 

Water Works Construction, from the income of the 

water works 30,000.00 

Water Loan Interest, from the income of the water 

works . 15,415.00 



Amount carried forward .... S824,017.02 



mayor's inaugural address of 1895. 



45 



Amount brought forward 



8824,017.02 



Reduction of Funded Debt, balance of income of 

the water works (estimated) .... 5,486.30 

Total amount of appropriations for the year . §829,503.32 



The following tables, giving a condensed history of the city's 
finances, are herewith presented for comparison and reference : — 













Tax Rate Per 




« r„ . „ 


Amount of 


Increase of 


Reduction of 


$1,000 Valuation 




Year. 


Funded Debt. 


Funded Debt. 


Funded Debt. 


on account of 
Reduction of 
Funded Debt. 


^r\xx,r\ 


% 593,349 
643,354 
809,354 








J 

Dec. 


\J *T Xi 

31, 1872 
1873 


S 50,005 
166,000 
















1874 


1,419,854 


610,500 


— 










1875 


1,571,854 


152,000 












' 1876 


1,606,844 


45,000 


S 55,130.62 


32.07 




1877 


1,606,854 


10,000 


58,828.58 


2.30 




' 1878 


1,596,854 




61,004.64 


2.91 




' 1879 


1,585,000 




64,915.76 


3.42 




1880 


1,585,000 


— — 


55,739.35 


2.72 




1881 


1,585,000 




58,498.64 


2.59 




1882 


1,585,000 




61,390.59 


2.65 




1883 


1,585,000 




64,479.01 


2.70 




1884 


1,585,000 




67,719.33 


2.78 




1885 


*1, 525,000 




71,305.66 


2.87 




1886 


1,525,000 




66,894.23 


2.57 




1887 


1,525,000 




70,252.88 


2.56 




1888 


*860,500 


25,000 


37,000.00 


1.28 




' 1889 


952,500 


130,000 


38,000.00 


1.27 




1890 


1,057,500 


150,000 


45,000.00 


1.38 




' 1891 


1,045,500 


45,000 


57,000.00 


1.55 




' 1892 


1,194,500 


253,000 


104,000.00 


2.73 




1893 


1,279,500 


222,000 


137,000.00 


3.27 




1894 


1,344,500 


172,000 


107,000.00 


2.42 



* Sinking Fund applied. 



46 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



^EAR. 


Valuation. 


Tax Levy. 


Rate. 


1872 


$22,755,325 


$274,374.45 


$13.00 


1873 


29,643,100 


389,214.48 


12.80 


1874 


30,837,700 


473,235.50 


15.00 


1875 


81,317,000 


518,161.40 


16.20 


1876 


26,573,400 


504,745.24 


18.60 


1877 


25,479,400 


471,789.14 


18.10 


1878 


20,976,900 . 


409,497.10 


19.00 


1879 


18,950,100 


352,553.80 


18.00 


1880 


20,458,100 


402,927.71 


10.10 


1881 


22,569,100 


452,945.45 


19.50 


1882 


23,162,200 


425,721.16 


17.80 


1883 


23,812,900 


411,645.43 


16.70 


1884 


24,331,100 


418,750.26 


16.60 


1885 


24,878,400 


428,605.44 


16.60 


1886 


26,003,200 


416,987.28 


15.40 


1887 


27,471,800 


424,309.14 


14.80 


1888 


28,765,400 


421,458.60 


14.00 


1889 


30,004,600 


440,324.40 


14.00 


1890 


32,557,500 


447,704.00 


14.00 


1891 


36,843,440 


539,137.10 


14.00 


1892 


38,093,100 


596,357.50 


15.00 


1893 


41,873,600 


675,886.80 


15.50 


1894 


44,142,900 


721,165.53 


15.70 



STATEMENT OF PUBLIC PROPERTY. 



The value of the property of the city December 31, 1891, was 
$1,685,637.46. The property acquired during the year 1892 was as 
follows : — 



Nathan Tufts Park 
Edgerly Schoolhouse addition 
Water Works extension . 
Land on Tufts street 



$21,591.45 
11,217.50 

34,863.17 
2,142.00 



mayor's inaugural address of 1805. 



47 



The value of the property of the city December 31, 1892. was 
81,752,351.58. The property acquired during the year 1893 was as 
follows : — 

Estate of the First Congregational Society, Central 

Hill 845,000.00 

Fire Department, relief engine .... 3,000.00 

Fire Department, land on Highland avenue . . 2,970.83 

Nathan Tufts Park 13,466.33 

Schoolhouse in Ward Three (Glines) . . . 1,200.68 
Schoolhouse in Ward Four, south side Fitchburg 

Railroad 3,255.39 

Schoolhouse, Edgerly addition .... 11,825.83 

Schoolhouse, Bingham addition .... 5,710.00 

Schoolhouse, English High 2,018.00 

Water Works extension ...... 35,545.30 

Total amount of property acquired during the year, 8133,992.36 

The value of the property of the city December 31, 1893, includ- 
ing an increase in valuation of old property by the committee of that 
year amounting to $104,867.88, was 81,981,211.82. The property 
acquired during the year 1894 was as follows : — 

Fire Department, central fire station 

Fire Department, central fire station, electrical 

apparatus, etc. ..._... 

Fire Department, chemical engine and equipment . 
Fire Department, hook and ladder station. Highland 

avenue . . . . 

Fire Department, hook and ladder station, equipment 

and furniture ....... 

Fire Department, land for fire station. Ward One 
Highways, city stable ...... 

Nathan Tufts Park 

Schoolhouse, Bingham addition . . . . 

Schoolhouse, Edgerly addition .... 

Schoolhouse, English High ..... 



§22,286.43 

2,106.32 
2,498.53 

9,232.48 

3,719.00 

6,000.00 

10,351.88 

17,649.28 

9,206.87 

1,837.19 

44.185.33 



Atnoinit carried forward 



8129,073.31 



48 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Ainou7it brought forward .... $129,073.31 
Schoolhouse, English High, heating, ventilating and 

plumbing 27,797.28 

Schoolhouse, O. S. Knapp addition . . . 12,623.46 
Schoolhouse, Ward Four, south side Fitchburg Rail- 
road 16,190.10 

Water Works extension ...... 28,375,67 



$214,059.82 

RECAPITULATION OF PUBLIC PROPERTY, 
1889 to 1894 inclusive. 

. $1,287,023.44 



Public property December 31, 1888 
Public property acquired in 1889 
Public property acquired in 1890 
Public property acquired in 1891 
Total amount of new property . 

Public property December 31, 1891 



$123,637.42 
136,507.07 
138,469.53 

398,614.02 



$1,685,637.46 



xA.mount of public property December 31, 1891, as per 

inventory ....... §1,685,637.46 

Property acquired in 1892 . . . $ 66,714.12 
Property acquired in 1893 . . . 133,992.36 
Property acquired in 1894 . . . 211,090.86 



Total amount of new property . . . 411,797.34 

Increase in valuation of old property by committee in 

1893 104,867.88 



Total amount of public property Dec. 31, 1894 $2,202,302.68 

The unexpended balances of public property accounts, not in- 
cluded in the above, but represented in the funded debt account, 
amount to $61,913.77. 

Complaint has been made in some quarters that the valuation of 
the city has been unduly increased during the past three years. 
This statement is not true. While human judgment is not infallible. 



mayor's inaugural address of 1895. 49 

and some property is quite as likely to be undervalued as overvalued, 
I believe the Board of Assessors is composed of conscientious, dis- 
criminating and experienced men. I am inclined to the belief that 
an unexpected increase of the tax rate has caused more complaint 
than overvaluation, and that '' hard times " has been the most potent 
cause for complaint. An examination of the treasurer's reports will 
prove the fact that the percentage valuation during the last three 
years has not increased, but rather decreased. 

The valuation of the city in 1880 was 820,458,100. It was in- 
creased during the four years' term of Mayor Cummings, nineteen per 
cent. ; during the four years' term of Mayor Burns, twenty-one per 
cent. ; during Mayor Pope's administration, twenty-seven per cent., 
atid in the last three years, sixteen per cent. But from last year's 
valuation should be deducted the valuation of property never before 
assessed in any administration, including the grounds of the McLean 
Asylum, used for railroad purposes, making the net increase of valua- 
tion on the natural growth of the city, less than fifteen per cent. 

During the previous administration the city debt was increased 
$185,000. During the past three years, $299,000. 

Of this amount $100,000 was borrowed before I came into office, 
but as this administration has been credited with the payment of 
$87,500 of this loan, and may possibly have the credit of paying the 
balance, it is allowed to stand against this administration. Allowing 
the credit of §12,500, and deducting the special loan of 8100,000 for 
paving of Somerville avenue, the debt of the city for ordinary purposes 
has been increased only 81,500 over the last administration. A neigh- 
boring city with a valuation of 844,000,000, has a debt of 83,479,676, 
or more than two and one-half times that of Somerville. 

The value of our public property is 82,202,302.68, not including the 
amount of 861,913.77, not yet paid out, but represented in the funded 
debt, not to mention the paving loan of 8100,000, or the sum of 
8785,000 — the cost of our sewer system. There are but few cities 
in the Commonwealth whose financial standing is superior to that of 
Somerville. 

The average tax rate of the thirty cities of the State is 816.18, 
our tax, 815.70, being forty-eight cents per thousand below the average 
and thirty-eight cents below the average tax rate of Somerville since 
its incorporation. The city tax rate last year was 813.77, but the 

(4) 



50 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

State, and the increased County and Metropolitan Sewer tax, SI. 93, 
increased the rate to $15.70. It is expected that the State tax will be 
less than last year, but I am informed that the County tax will be 
somewhat increased. It is possible that the Metropolitan Sewer tax 
will be larger than last year. We begin the year in good financial 
condition, and all the departments are free from any deficiency. 

The number of building permits issued during the year by the 
Inspector of Buildings has fallen somewhat from that of the previous 
year. The number of permits for dwellings issued has been 339, but 
the superintendent informs me that these dwellings are designed for 
752 families, classified as follows : Ward One, 39 ; Ward Two, 208 ; 
Ward Three, 256; Ward Four, 249; total, 752. If these families 
average four persons each, the increase of population at the rate of 
3,000 per year can easily be accounted for. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Activity in school building has prevailed during the past year. 
The Bingham and Knapp Schools have been enlarged, and the 
George W. Durell School ( named in honor of the beloved senior 
pastor of the city — the dean of Somerville ) has been erected. This 
building was referred to as the ''Kent Street School" one year ago. 
The new English High School, now in course of rapid completion, 
crowns our Central Hill, and is a credit to all who have been engaged 
in its construction. The work of finishing the interior is in progress, 
and the building will be completed and ready for occupancy in a short 
time. The School Board, it is understood, does not propose to use it 
until the beginning of the next school year. Appropriations will be 
required to fit up manual training rooms and to purchase furniture. 
This money will soon be required in order that everything may be in 
readiness for use when wanted. Appropriations will also be required 
for school accommodations. Time will not permit me to dwell at 
length upon the recent very practical and interesting annual report of 
the Superintendent of Schools. Indeed, there is no reason why I 
should do so, because the press is already discussing its merits. The 
Superintendent has prepared a school map of the city, whereon is 
located in circular lines each school district, showing the grammar 
school centres, the location of every schoolhouse, and the territory it 
is intended to serve ; and additional circles are drawn to show the 



^iayor's inaugural address of 1895. 51 

proper location of all schools to be erected to cover the portions of 
the city now being built up. The first recommendations are that a 
new twelve-room grammar school be built in West Somerville in the 
vicinity of Holland and Jay streets, and that a four or six-room build- 
ing be erected on the vacant land adjoining the Prescott School on 
Myrtle street. The advantage of this location is that these buildings 
can be heated by the same engine and cared for by the same janitor. 
This plan was suggested in the report one year ago, but no definite 
action was taken. The report contains recommendations for erection 
of other schools, but the two mentioned are deemed to be the most 
important. It gives me pleasure to state that the cost of each pupil 
in the average membership has been reduced to $22.90 per annum — 
seventy-eight cents less than last year, and 81.03 per pupil less than in 
1892. The average expenditure on schools account during the past 
three years has been reduced more than five per cent. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

I have annually reviewed at considerable length the work needed 
to be done upon some of our important thoroughfares, but not as 
much of it has been undertaken as could be desired, partly by 
reason of the limited appropriation beyond the cost of maintaining 
the department. However, extensive repairs have been made on 
Washington street, from the Fitchburg Railroad to Beacon street ; 
Elm street, from Willow avenue to Cedar street ; Medford, from 
Somerville avenue to railroad crossing ; School street, from Berkeley 
street to Somerville avenue; besides Central, Greenville, Gorham, 
Claremon, Hudson and New Cross streets. Twenty-one streets have 
been laid out, and sidewalks, at a cost of more than 819,000, laid in 
twenty-seven streets, covering nearly 16,000 square yards wdth three 
and one-tenth miles of edgestones. Two miles of private streets have 
been laid out and accepted. The length of streets, courts and alleys 
in the city are: Public streets, 51.94 miles; private streets, 32.80 
miles ; total, 84.74 miles. 

During the year the new city stable has been built and occupied. 
It is commodious and intended to anticipate some of the future needs 
of this department. Several difficult problems will confront the High- 
way Committee this year in relation to the best method of placing the 
principal thoroughfares in good condition. Among these are Scmer- 



52 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ville avenue, from the East Cambridge line to Medford street ; Wash- 
ington street, from the Boston line to Medford street ; Medford street, 
from the East Cambridge line to Somerville avenue, which should, in 
my opinion, be paved, as it has been literally cut up by excavations 
for two sewers, two water mains and one gas main, and for these 
reasons the subsoil is in very bad condition ; Mystic avenue, which 
the County Commissioners have ordered the city to rebuild and grade 
— the work to be completed during the present year. The following- 
named streets need rebuilding or extensive repairs : Highland ave- 
nue, from Medford street to Davis square ; Webster avenue, from 
Cambridge line to the Fitchburg Railroad ; Medford street, from 
Cross to Highland avenue ; and Oilman square to Magoun square, 
with parts of Pearl, Summer and Beacon streets. I do not know that 
it will be possible to do all this work within the limits of the year, but 
the most important part of it can be accomplished^ and the work kept 
in hand until these and other improvements are made. My opinion 
is that it is of more importance to repair or rebuild some of these old 
streets rather than at present to build many of the lately accepted 
streets, although the Highway Committee must judge as to the prior 
necessity. 

An important subject which should receive your early attention is 
the question of how to reach that portion of Somerville south of the 
Fitchburg Railroad and west of Park street — the portion known as 
the "George W. Durell School district." The subject of reaching it by 
an overhead foot-bridge and by a subway was considered by the 
Highway Committee last year, but no definite result was recorded. 
The assessed valuation of real estate in that section is $571,800. It 
is a section cut off in a large measure from communication with the 
westerly part of the city. When the new schoolhouse was built, it 
was for the stated purpose of preventing the scholars from crossing 
the track at Kent street, but while the children living on the south 
side are not obliged to cross, the order has been reversed, and the 
children from the north side who are obliged to attend the new school 
are forced to cross, and naturally take the shortest path — across the 
track at Kent street. It seems to me that the subject of building a 
road-bridge in Kent street should receive your early and favorable 
consideration. 



■mayok"?j inaugural address of 1895. 



53 



SEWERS. 
'The*€i'tir' Engfirter has forwarded to me a communication of too 
areata length to trc inserted in this addresSj in relation to the sewer 
system of fne city and its needs. It wiU ^e presented to the City 
Council £t an early day. Two miles of sewers have been built during 
Tthe past year at a cost' of $15,901.20. The total length of the system 
ns 58.59 miles, ^iiad the total cost has been S785j000. 

FIRE DEPAJR.TMENT. 

The manual force of this department when complete consists of 
102 Mien, inclufding the acting ladd^rmen on Ladder No. 2, who have 
not as yet received full appointment, it having been thought best that 
they -should serve a short probationary term. Total permanent men, 
22 ; call men, '80. Nine vacancies now exist in the call force. Eight 
permanent men were added to the force last year. The importance 
of a SLifficient number 'oi permanent men employed in order that no 
piece of apparatus will go to a fire without a nucleus of men to put it 
in immediate operation canaK)t be denied and should receive the at- 
tentiofi of the City Council. One hundred and eight bell alarms and 
:2;3 still alarms have been given during the year. The total loss by 
tfire has been $31,112; insurance on the property amounted to 
$63,4:51. 

Mil the recommendations in relation to this department contained 
m the inaugural address of 1804 have been carried into effect, viz. : 
Tihe ejRection of a central fire station on the Brastow Schoolhouse 
lot ; of , a hook ;and ladder house on Highland avenue; the purchase 
of a site of a steamer station in Ward One ; the purchase of a chemi- 
cal engine, additional equipments for the new houses and the exten- 
sion of the fire-alarm system, have been carried into effect. In no 
year has the Fire Department been provided with such buildings and 
appliances. It affords me pleasure to have the Chief Engineer say 
that ^Hhe central fire station is in every way equal to that owned by 
any city in the State, and one in which any citizen can take pride." 
Prominent citizens have expressed gratification that it is a building 
erected with the idea ^^ that Somerville has a future." 

The Chief Engineer calls attention to the fact that owing to the in- 
creasing number of tall buildings and apartment houses, it may soon 
be necessary to procure an aerial ladder truck. Room for this, as 



54 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

well as the relief engine, is provided for in the new central fire 
station. He recommends that a building be erected on the lot of 
land purchased for thai purpose on Broadway, opposite Franklin 
street, to furnish room for a steam fire engine, wagon and other appa- 
ratus. He states that it is needed there, as the gravity water pressure 
is not maintained when several streams are taken from hydrants. 
Steam is necessary to furnish effective streams. The department is in 
effective condition. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

That this department is admirably conducted may be inferred 
from the immunity from crime during another year. The faithful and 
efficient service rendered by the Chief in the execution of the re- 
sponsible duties of his office has been of great assistance to me. My 
recommendation of last year for the appointment of three additional 
patrolmen, and a matron to take exclusive care of female prisoners, 
was confirmed by the City Council, as that to provide additional boxes 
and circuits. The force numbers forty-two men, rank and file. 

The Chief is of the opinion that a reserve force of six or eight men 
should be established under the laws, the men to be under pay only 
when employed. Such a force is needed from which to detail men to 
take the place of regular men when absent from duty. The usual 
number of men could thus be kept on duty, and no route or section 
would be neglected. He wishes to establish a system of keeping a 
good reserve of the regular men, who, when not on the streets, will be 
at the station at night or other time of the day for fire and other 
emergency calls. To carry this into effect, he would need the rooms 
now occupied by the Somerville Light Infantry. I favor this sugges- 
tion. The military company is in need of better accommodations. 
The Adjutant-General has reduced the rental of the rooms to $300 per 
annum for this reason. I recommend that an effort be made to find 
more suitable quarters for the company. Our citizens look upon the 
company with commendable pride. It is our only active military 
organization, and should be provided with more adequate accommo- 
dations. The ambulance has been placed in the police department, 
and already 90 calls have been made for its service. 

Mrs. Mary A. Staples was appointed matron, and her calls have 
been promptly made. She is kind to the female prisoners, and faith- 
ful in the discharge of her duties. 



mayor's inaugural address of 1895. 55 

There are some patrolmen — two or three in number — who 
should be provided with some light work, or retired. Their places on 
the street could be taken by men m the reserve force, should it be 
estabhshed. With this exception the force will compare favorably 
with any of its numbers in the State. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

During the early part of the year the Board of Overseers of the 
Poor were actively engaged, owing to the general depression of busi- 
ness, and consequent hard times. Many men were out of employ- 
ment and required some assistance. The Board has aided 1,188 per- 
sons, representing 268 famihes, an increase of 294 persons and 30 
families, compared with 1893. 

There are now 56 insane patients in the State lunatic hospitals 
and private families, and 27 sane persons are being supported in out- 
of-town almshouses and private families. 

The finances of the Board have been well managed, the net ex- 
penses of the department being about $17,000. 

The Board at its last meeting expressed the earnest desire that 
something may be done at the beginning of the present year in re- 
gard to providing a suitable house for the unfortunate poor. If an 
almshouse were ready for occupancy to-day, there are nearly 50 per- 
sons who would be admitted at once. The hope of the overseers to 
obtain an almshouse has been long deferred. Year after year a 
similar request has been made, but nothing of a definite nature has 
been accomplished. To my mind there is an element of pathos in the 
attitude of these successive Boards. They have pleaded for the poor. 
Some one has said, "The recommendation for an almshouse in Somer- 
ville is a safe one to make." These overseers are business men, 
identified with the interests of Somerville. They have had experience 
in the care of the poor. Personally, I have no doubt that the present 
system of boarding out the poor is much the cheaper method. But 
is it the wisest and most humane method? Is it best for the good 
name of Somerville? Before making a formal recommendation upon 
this subject, I suggest that the overseers be authorized to hire a house 
for the proper accommodation of those needing full support, if a suit- 
able one can be found in the city. 



56 • ANNUAL REPORTS. 

During the year many persons have been aided with money, cloth- 
ing and work, and others kept from pauperism and city relief by the 
Board of Associated Charities, organized a little more than a year 
ago. This body dispenses in a practical and effective manner the 
private contributions of the charitable. It receives no appropriation 
from the city, but labors in harmony with all organizations for the re- 
lief of the indigent, 

SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 

This Board has been actively employed during the year in the 
regular work of the department, and in relaying with cast-iron pipe 
nearly live miles of streets, replacing old cement pipe of sizes ranging 
from two to eight inches. The length of pipe extended is about two 
and one-fourth miles. The net increase of hydrants set has been 
61, or nearly twice the net increase for 1893, and 361 service pipes 
have been put in, the total length being 7,890 feet. 

The new regulations relative to services, which were adopted by 
the Board early in 1894, provide for the laying of the pipes to the 
street line only, thus causing a decrease in number of feet laid from 
that of previous years. 

The work of principal importance has been the relaying with cast- 
iron pipe of Somerville avenue, from Central street to Elm street, 
about 1,720 feet; Elm street, from Somerville avenue to Willow ave- 
nue, about 2,800 feet ; Highland avenue, from Walnut street ta 
Central street, about 2,900 feet ; Summer street, from Preston street 
to Cherry street, extending the same to Willow avenue, about 5,000 
feet ; Marshall street, from Broadway to Pearl street, about 1,675 feet. 
There has also been laid new pipe in Wallace, Irving, Orchard, 
Craigie streets and Linden avenue, over 1,000 feet each ; and a large 
number of streets requiring an average of 500 feet each. 

ELECTRIC LIGHTS AND LINES. 

The Superintendent reports that during the year 30 arc and 21 
incandescent lights have been added, and 22 incandescent lights have 
been discontinued. The number of arc lights added the year before 
was 41, or 11 more than the number added last year. There are now 
in use 348 arc, 209 incandescent, and three oil lamps. 



mayor's inaugural address of 1895. 57 

The fire alarm has been transferred to the central fire station, 
the entire upper story being devoted to electrical apartments. A 
large battery room, capable of holding 1,000 jars, provides for the 
future growth of the city, and prevents the past crowded condition of 
the room. 

A new eight-circuit repeater has been put in, with two bell circuits 
combined. The circuits have been increased from three to seven, 
thus affording a better protection to the city. Formerly, if a break 
occurred, one third of the city was left unprotected until the trouble 
on the line could be remedied ; now, by arrangement of boxes and 
lessening of territory covered by each circuit, but a small portion is 
left unprotected during a break or trouble on the line. 

A bell of 3,000 pounds has been placed on the new central fire 
station; also one on Hook and Ladder No. 2, Highland avenue. 
Five new alarm boxes have been put in circuit during the year. The 
fire alarm is one of the best in the State. New boxes are needed in 
the isolated parts of the city, and a striker to take the place of the bell 
formerly on the Unitarian Church, now placed on Hook and Ladder 
No. 2. Either the old or the new High School would be a good loca- 
tion for such a striker. A horse and wagon for use in repairing 
breaks, conveying material, and dispatch in reaching trouble on the 
line, is much needed. There is ample room for this team at the 
central fire station. 

SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. 

In view of the reports of the departments to which I have referred, 
I recommend to your careful consideration and favorable action : — 

1. The request of the School Board for the erection of a twelve- 
room grammar schoolhouse in West Somerville, on Holland street, 
near Simpson avenue ; the erection of a four or six-room building in 
connection with the Prescott School ; an appropriation of 83,500 for 
fitting up the manual training school in the English High School ; an 
appropriation for furnishing the English High School. This school 
will, in addition, require $7,500 for teachers' salaries, and 84,000 for 
equipment of books and apparatus. As considerable time will be re- 
quired to manufacture the furniture, it seems desirable that this appro- 
priation should be made as soon as possible. 



58 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

2. The recommendation of the Superintendent of the Fire 
Department for the erection of a steamer house on the land on Broad- 
way, purchased for that purpose. 

3. The appointment of a special committee to take immediate 
action to secure for Somerville some of the advantages to be derived 
from the boulevard proposed by the MetropoHtan Park Commission. 
Both the City Solicitor and Mayor have been endeavoring to 
secure some considerations of the claims of this city, but an active 
committee is needed to assist in this work. 

4. The organization of a reserve force in the Police Department^ 
and providing another armory for the Somerville Light Infantry. I 
also recommend that the room occupied by Justice Story in the court 
building be put in better condition. 

5. The paving of Medford street, from the Cambridge line to 
Somerville avenue, and such action with reference to other streets in 
that locality as shall commend itself to your good judgment. 

6. That an additional appropriation of $3,000 be made to com- 
plete the $6,000 required to furnish necessary stacks for books in the 
Public Library, in order that this work may be completed at an early 
day, and that arrangements be made as soon as possible to provide 
room that will be imperatively demanded when the stacks are com- 
pleted. My views on this subject were fully set forth one year ago. 
I am in hearty sympathy with the project, and at no far distant day 
I hope to recommend a definite plan with reference to its execution, 
in accordance with the desires of the trustees and the people. 

7. The Board of Health will require more money in con- 
sequence of the additional work to be performed in the maintenance 
of a stable. The old city stable has been placed in care of this Board, 
and the public may be assured that the removal of ashes and offal 
will be conducted promptly and in a satisfactory manner. The 
recommendation of the Board of Health of 1892 will be included in 
the new order of things, and Wyatt's pit will be used as a dumping 
ground. 



mayor's IXAUGUR-A.L ADDRESS OF 1895. 59 

NEW CITY HALL. 

The views stated in my address one year ago in relation to this 
subject have undergone no change, and I do not know that I could 
express them in stronger language, although the condition of affairs 
is worse to-day than it was at that time. Nothing that I said that 
day was received with so many manifestations of approval. When- 
ever the building shall be erected it should be provided for by money 
borrowed on a long loan. Our S12 limit does not provide more than 
enough to meet our current expenses, and the basis of our borrowing 
capacity does not afford us much more than is needed for the improve- 
ments carried into effect on funded debt account. It has been so 
every year and will so continue. The Legislature has always mani- 
fested a willingness to permit cities to borrow on long time, beyond 
the debt limit, for much needed public improvements. We could not 
have paved Somerville avenue in one year by any other method. 

I believe that the only thing lacking in the public spirit of the 
citizens of Somerville is the determination to develop and exhibit 
itself. It must have some centre of attraction. In my opinion it 
must grow up around this hill and centre here. This is the centre. 
From the organization of the town and for many years it was the 
religious centre, here, in this very house. For 42 years it has 
been the centre of advanced public school education. Since the 
organization of the city it has been the centre of civil government. 
Our Public Library is here. The memorials of patriotism should be 
here. Here, on this very summit, — the Shiloh of the town, — we 
shall yet witness the development of what is grand and inspiring, and 
patriotic in the public spirit of Somerville. I commend this subject 
to your careful consideration. 

Gentlemen of the City Couxcil : — 

I have claimed your attention longer than I intended, but not 
longer than a cursory glance at the affairs our city seems to demand. 
Much has been omitted, which, perhaps, to your minds, may be re- 
garded of equal, if not superior, importance to the topics I have re- 
ferred to. They will commend themselves to you as you go forward 
in the duties which we have now sworn to perform. We came here 
as citizens, we shall go out public servants. The citizens have 



60 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

entrusted the welfare of the city to our watchful care and conscien- 
tious votes, and we have accepted the trust. Let none of us disappoint 
any who have placed confidence in us. I look forward with great 
hope, and at the same time, deep soHcitude. Many problems yet 
unsolved in the public mind await our judicious action. The tendency 
is always strong to legislate along the lines of ward limits. Naturally 
we are glad to do pleasant things for the benefit of neighbors and 
friends, but now that we have subscribed to the oath of office, we are 
expected to act for the best interest of the entire city. The welfare of 
the city is the welfare of all the wards. The city is greater than the 
wards. The city is not made up of, but is divided into wards. The 
greater includes the less. The city is the unit. Somerville claims us 
now. Somerville, with its teeming population, with all its great and 
multiplied interests, Somerville — its good name, its reputation, its 
municipal honor — demands all that is best in us. We will sink all 
personal and local considerations, and labor, doing with our might 
what our hands find to do, early and late, in the storms of misunder- 
standing and prejudice, if they befall us, as well as in the pleasant 
sunlight of appreciated service, remembering that "whosoever will be 
the chiefest shall be servant of all." 



REPORT 



or THE 



TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 
OF TAXES. 



(5) 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 30, 1895. 
Referred to Committee on Finance, and sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 30, 1895. 
Referred to Committee on Finance, in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Committee on Finance, February 13, 1895. 
To THE City Council of Somerville : — 

In accordance with the provisions of the ordinance (chapter 4, section 10), 
providing for the annual examination and audit of the accounts of the treasurer 
and collector of taxes, the committee on finance have examined the report of the 
treasurer, referred to them by the city council, complying also with section 5, 
of the same ordinance, for the examination of the books, accounts, papers, vouchers, 
and documents of the auditor and city treasurer, comparing and verifying them with 
the certificates transmitted to them from the city clerk, committees, boards, and 
officers of the city responsible for the receipts of public funds. The cash account 
of the treasurer has been verified by the actual count of the cash on hand, and the 
balances reported to be in the banks of deposit have been confirmed by the officers 
of the several banks. All the members of the committee devoted the day to the 
examination of the report, which has been found to be correct. We recommend 
that this report be accepted, and printed in the annual reports of 1894. 

The committee desire to express their thanks to the city treasurer for the assist- 
ance rendered by him during this protracted examination, and to testify to the faith- 
ful manner in which he has discharged the duties of his office, his careful attention 
to its details, and the excellent condition of his books and accounts. 

WM. H. HODGKINS, 
CALVIN H. WHITNEY, 
MELVILLE D. JONES, 
L. HERBERT HUNTLEY, 
A. C. FAIRBANKS, 
FRED'K W. PARKER, 
HERBERT L. CLARK, 
HOWARD D. MOORE, 



^ Committee. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Treasurer's Office, January 17, 1895. 
To THE Honorable, the Mayor and City Council of the City 

OF SOMERVILLE : 

Gentleme7i, — The undersigned presents herewith the twenty- 
third annual report of the financial condition of the city, and a state- 
ment showing, in detail, the receipts and disbursements for the year 
ending December 31, 1894. 

The value of the property of the city December 31, 1893, was' 
$1,981,211.82. The property acquired during the year was as 
follows : 

Fire Department, Central Fire Station, Brastow 

School lot % 22,286.43 

Fire Department, Central Fire Station, electrical 

apparatus and furniture .... 2,106.32 

Fire Department, chemical engine and equipment . 2,498.53 

Fire Department, Hook and Ladder Station, High- 
land avenue 9,232.48 

Fire Department, Hook and Ladder Station, equip- 
ment and furniture ..... 3,719.00 

Fire Department, land for Fire Station, Ward One . 6,000.00 

Highways, City Stable 

Nathan Tufts Park 

Schoolhouse, Bingham Addition 

Schoolhouse, Edgerly Addition 

Schoolhouse, English High 

Schoolhouse, High and English High, heating, ven- 
tilating and plumbing .... 27,797.28 



10,351.88 

17,649.28 

9,206.87^ 

1,837.19 

44,185.33 



Amount carried forwa7'd . .... 8156,870.59 



66 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward .... $156,870.59 

Schoolhouse, O. S. Knapp Addition . . . 12,623.46 

Schoolhouse, Ward Four, south side Fitchburg R. R. 16,190.10 

Water Works Extension . . ^ . . . . 28,375.67 

Total amount of property acquired during the 

year $214,059.82 

Making the value of the public property, December 
31, 1894, as per Table A, $2,195,271.64. 

The Funded Debt, December 31, 1893, as per Table B of the 
last annual report, was $1,279,500.00. 

The debt was increased during the year by appropriations as 
follows : 



'Fire Department, Central Fire Station 
Fire Department, Central Fire Station, electrical 

apparatus, etc. ..... 

Fire Department, chemical engine and equipment 

Fire Department, Hook and Ladder Station 

Fire Department, Hook and Ladder Station, equip 

ment, etc. ...... 

Fire Department, land for Fire Station, Ward One 
Highways, City Stable ..... 

Nathan Tufts Park ..... 

Public Library Improvement .... 

Schoolhouse, Bingham Addition 

Schoolhouse, Edgerly Addition 

Schoolhouse, High and English High, heating, ven 

tilating, etc. ..... 

/Schoolhouse, O. S. Knapp Addition 
Schoolhouse, Ward Four, south side Fitchburg R. R 
Sewers, Construction ..... 

Total amount of appropriations on Funded 
Debt account ..... 



$ 26,000.00 

5,250.00 

3,000.00 

10,000.00 

3,750.00 
6,000.00 
14,500.00 
15,000.00 
3,000.00 
1,000.00 
2,000.00 

35,000.00 
15,500.00 
12,000.00 
20,000.00 

$172,000.00 



For which the following bonds were issued, viz. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 67 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1582 to 1592, payable 1895, 

interest 4 per cent 311,000.00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1593 to 1673, $9,000 payable 

annually 1896 to 1904, interest 4 per cent. . 81,000.00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1674 to 1733, 86,000 payable 

annually 1905 to 1914, interest 4 per cent. . 60,000.00 

City Loan Sewer Bonds Nos. 54 to 73, 81,000 pay- 
able annually 1895 to 1914, interest 4 per 
cent 20,000.00 



Making the total amount of bonds issued in 1894 . $172,000.00 
Tlie following bonds became due and were paid during the year, 



VIZ. : 



City Loan Bonds Nos. 1234 to 1243, interest 4 per 

cent 810,000.00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 887 to 909, interest 4 per 

cent 23,000.00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 934 to 938, interest 4 per 

cent 5,000.00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1033 to 1042, interest 4 per 

cent 10,000.00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1115 to 1118, interest 4 per 

cent 4,000.00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1161 to 1167, interest 4 per 

cent 7,000.00 

City Loan Bonds Nos. 1325 to 1348, interest 4J per 

cent 24,000.00 

City Loan Sewer Bond No. 36, interest 4 J per cent. 1,000.00 

City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 6 to 10, interest 4 per 

cent. 5,000.00 

Water Loan Bonds No. 283, interest 4 per cent. . 1,000.00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 100 to 111, interest 5 per 

cent . 12,000.00 



Amoimi carried forward ..... $102,000.00 



68 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward . .... $102,000.00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 315 to 317, interest 4 per 

cent . . . 3,000.00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 399 to 400, interest 4 per 

cent 2,000.00 



Making the total amount of bonds paid during the 

year • $107,000.00 

And leaving the net Funded Debt, December 31, 1894, as per Table 
B, $1,344,500.00. 

RESOURCES. 

Assessors' warrant for the tax levy, assessed upon the polls and 
estates of the inhabitants, as follows, viz. : 

Real Estate, valuation $40,598,900.00 

Personal Property, valuation . . . . . 3,544,000.00 



Total valuation $44,142,900.00 

A rate of $15.70 on $1,000 valuation, with 14,061 

polls at $2 each, gives the total amount of 

tax levy $721,165.53 

Borrowed on Funded Debt account to provide for the 

cost of public improvements 
Revenue from the Water Works . . . 
National Bank and Corporation taxes 
Received from County Treasurer for Dog Licenses 
Received from all other sources 
Unexpended balances from 1893 



Total amount of resources 



172,000.00 

83,401.30 

22,225.59 

2,710.90 

56,643.95 

100,083.73 



,158,231.00 



The appropriations, credits, and balances of the various accounts 
were as follows : 

Accounts. Appropriations. Credits. Expenditures 

and Balances. 
Fire Department : — 

Appropriation . . $ 43,000.00 
Received for old mate- 
rials, etc. . . . $136.74 
Expenditures . . $48,098.48 
Deficiency . . 4,961.74 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 69 

Accounts. Appropriations. Credits. Expenditures 

and Balances. 

Fire Department, Central 
Fire Station, Brastow 
School lot : — 

Appropriation, Funded 

Debt account . . $26,000.00 

Expenditures . . $22,286.43 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . . . 3,713.57 

Fire Department, Central 
Fire Station, Electri- 
cal Apparatus and Fur- 
niture : — 

Appropriation, Funded 

Debt account . . 5,250.00 

Expenditures . . 2,106.32 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . . . 3,143.68 

Fire Department, Chemi- 
ical Engine and 
Equipment : — 

Appropriation, Funded 

Debt account . . 3,000.00 

Expenditures . . 2,498.53 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . . . 501.47 

Fire Department, Hook 
and Ladder Station, 
Highland avenue : — 

Appropriation, Funded 

Debt account . . 10,000.00 

Expenditures . . 9,232.48 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . . . 767.52 



70 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Accounts. Appropriations. Credits. Expenditures 

and Balances. 
Fire Department, Hook 

and Ladder Station, 
Highland avenue. 
Equipment and Fur- 
niture : — 

Appropriation, Funded 

Debt account . . $3,750.00 
Expenditures . . $3,719.00 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 ... 31.00 

Fire Department, Land for 
Fire Station, Ward 
One: — 

Appropriation . . 6,000.00 

Expended . . . 6,000.00 

Health Department : — 

Appropriation . . 12,000.00 
Received for permits, 

licenses, etc. . . $475.19 

Expenditures . . 17,917.73 

Deficiency . . . 5,442.54 

Highways : — 

Appropriation . . 60,000.00 
Received for labor and 

materials ... • 8,789.77 

Expenditures . . 68,298.58 

Unexpended balance . 491.19 

Highways, City Stable : — 
Appropriation, Funded 

Debt account . . 14,500.00 
Expenditures . . 10,351.88 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 ... 4,148.12 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 71 

Accounts, Appropriations. Credits. Expenditures 

and Balances. 
Highways, Paving Wash- 
ington street : — 

Expenditures . . 8406.91 

Deficiency . . . 406.91 

Indigent Soldiers and Sail- 
ors : — 

Appropriation . . $500.00 

Received of State of 

Massachusetts . .' §296.00 

Expended . . . 592.00 

Unexpended balance . 204.00 

Interest : — 

Appropriation . . 65,000.00 

Received interest on 

taxes, etc. . . 14,776. ?,2 

Expenditures . . 54,189.42 

Unexpended balance . 25,586.80 

Miscellaneous : — 

Appropriation . . 6,600.00 

Received for costs on 

taxes, licenses, etc. . 4,798.21 

Expenditures . . 13,732.11 

Deficiency . . . 2,333.90 

Nathan Tufts Park : — 

Appropriation, Funded 

Debt account . . 15,000.00 

Transferred from Over- 
lay and Abatement ac- 
count . . . 385.17 

Expenditures . . 17,649.28 

Deficiency ... * 2,264.11 



72 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Accounts. Appropriations. Credits. Expenditures 

and Balances. 
Police : — 

Appropriation . . $25,000.00 

Received bank and cor- 
poration taxes . . $22,225.59 

Received court fees, 

fines, etc. . . . 5,806.25 

Expenditures . . $50,323.39 

Unexpended balance . 2,708.45 

Police Station Incident- 
als : — 

Appropriation . . 3,500.00 

Transferred from School- 
house Incidentals ac- 
count . . . 600.00 
Received for rent, etc. . 307.00 
Expenditures . . 4,966.80 
Deficiency . . . 559.80 

Printing and Stationery : — 

Appropriation . . 6,500.00 

Expenditures . . 6,177.79 

Unexpended balance . 322.21 

Public Grounds : — 

Appropriation . . 4,500.00 

Received for labor, etc. 18.00 

Expenditures . . 4,705.94 

Deficiency ... 187.94 

Public Library : — 

Balance from 1893 . 23.36 

Appropriation . ^ . 6,500.00 

Received for dog licens- 
es, fines, etc. . . 3,044.12 

Expenditures . . 9,557.93 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 ... * 9.55 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 73 

Accounts. Appropriations. Credits. Expenditures 

and Balances. 
Public Library Improve- 
ment : — 

Appropriation, Funded 

Debt account . . $3,000.00 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . . . S3,000.00 

Reduction of Funded 
Debt : — 

Appropriation . . 100,000.00 

Balance from 1893 . §5,912.07 

Received income of 

Water Works, etc. . 10,344.80 

Expended ... " 107,000.00 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . . . 9,256.87 

Relief and Burial of Indi- 
gent Soldiers and Sail- 
ors : — 

Appropriation . . 4,000.00 

Received of State of 

Massachusetts . . 140.00 

Expenditures . . 5,580.06 

Deficiency . . . 1,440.06 

Salaries : — 

Appropriation . . 35,400.00 

Expenditures . . 38,045.03 

Deficiency . . . 2,645.03 

School Contingent : — 

Appropriation . . 16,000.00 

Received for tuition of 

non-resident pupils, 

etc 174.23 

Expenditures . . 16,026.10 

Unexpended balance . 148.13 



74 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Accounts. Appropriations. Credits. Expenditures 

and Balances. 
School Contingent, Jani- 
tors' Salaries : — 

Appropriation . . $11,000.00 

Expenditures . . $10,686.13 

Unexpended balance . 313.87 

School Fuel : — ■ 

Appropriation . . 9,000.00 

Received for fuel sold . $26.75 

Expenditures . . 8,948.12 

Unexpended balance . 78.63 

Schoolhouse, Bingham Ad- 
dition : — 



Appropriation, Funded 








Debt account . 


1,000.00 






Balance from 1893 




8,290.00 




Expenditures 






9,206.87 


Unexpended balance 






83.13 



Schoolhouse, Edgerly Addi- 
tion : — 

Appropriation, Funded 

Debt account . . 2,000.00 

Balance from 1893 . 456.67 

Expenditures . . 1,837.19 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . . . 619.48 

Schoolhouse, English 
High : — 

Balance from 1893 . 81,482.00 

Expenditures . . 44,185.33 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . . . 37,296.67 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. VO 

Accounts. Appropriations. Credits. Expenditures 

and Balances. 
Schoolhouse, High and 

English High, heating, 
ventilating and plumb- 
ing : — 

Appropriations, Funded 

Debt account . . $35,000.00 

Expenditures . . $27,797.28 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . . . 7,202.72 

Schoolhouse Incident- 
als : — 

Appropriation (less $600 

transferred) . . 11,400.00 

Received insurance pre- 
mium, etc. . . $112.80 

Expenditures . . 15,122.39 

Deficiency . . . 3,609.59 

Schoolhouse, O. S. Knapp 
Addition : — 

Appropriation, Funded 

Debt account . . 15,500.00 
Expenditures . . 12,623.46 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . . . 2,876.54 

Schoolhouse, Ward Four, 
south side F. R. 
R. : — 

Appropriation, Funded 

Debt account . . 12,000.00 

Balance from 1893 . 4,244.61 

Expenditures . . 16,190.10 

Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . . . 54.51 



76 



Accounts. 



School Teachers' 

aries : — 

Appropriation 

Expenditures 

Deficiency . 



Sal- 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 
Appropriations. 

. $125,000.00 



Credits. 



Expenditures 
and Balances. 



1128,755.39 
3,755.39 



Sewers, Construction : — 

Appropriation, Funded 
Debt account . 

Balance from 1893 

Expenditures(less assess- 
ments $12,112.61) . 

Received for permits, 
etc. 

Balance to be expended 
in 1895 . 



20,000.00 



$256.75 



1,033.50 



13,312.18 



7,978.07 



Sewers, Maintenance : — 

Appropriation 
Received for labor, etc. 
Expenditures 
Deficiency . 



7,000.00 



95.33 



7,260.05 
164.72 



Sidewalks : — 

Appropriation 
Received for edgestones 
Expenditures(less assess- 
ments $9,817.31) 
Unexpended balance 



10,000.00 



88.34 



10,051.58 
36.76 



Street Lights : — 

Appropriation 
Received for old lanterns 
Expenditures 
Unexpended balance 



44,000.00 



165.00 



42,955.84 
1,209.16 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 77 



Accounts. 

Support of Poor : — 
Appropriation 
Received for aid fur- 
nished, etc. 
Expenditures 
Deficiency 

Water Loan Interest : — 
Received of City of 

Boston, water rates 
Expenditures 

Water Maintenance : — 
Received from City of 

Boston, water rates 
Received for labor and 

materials . 
Received from Water 

Service account 
Deficiency balance from 

1893 
Expenditures 
Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . 

Watering Streets : — 
Appropriation 
Received of abutters 
Expenditures 
Unexpended balance 

Water Works Extension : — 

Balance from 1893 
Received from City of 

Boston, water rates . 
Received for labor and 

materials . 
Expenditures 
Balance to be expended 

in 1895 . 

(6) 



Appropriations. 



$15,000.00 



Credits. 



Expenditures 
and Balances. 



$3,368.64 



15,415.00 



32,500.00 
196.93 
147.65 



7,000.00 



8,026.02 



•14.94 

30,000.00 

1,857.39 



$19,733.13 
1,364.49 



15,415.00 



596.67 
31,936.90 

311.01 



14,975.57 
50.45 



30,233.06 
1,639.27 



78 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Accounts. Appropriations. Credits. Expenditures 

and Balances. 
State of Massachusetts : — 

Appropriation . . $31,380.00 

Expended, State tax $31,380.00 

State of Massachusetts, 
Metropolitan Sew- 
er: — 

Appropriation . . 22,230.79 

Expended, Sewer tax . 22,230.79 

State of Massachusetts, 
Non-resident Bank 
Stock : — 

Appropriation . . 847.80 

Expended, Non-resident 

tax . . . . 847.80 

County of Middlesex : — 

Appropriation . . 34,317.59 

Expended, County tax 34,317.59 

Overlay and Abatement : — 

Appropriation $3,889.35 

Transferred to 

Nathan Tufts 

Park account 385.17 

3,504.18 



Received for taxes . $19.60 

Applied and to be ap- 
plied to abatements on 
taxes . . . 3,523.78 



$893,165.53 $265,065.47 $1,158,231.00 
265,065.47 



$1,158,231.00 $1,158,231.00 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 79 

RECAPITULATION. 

Appropriations as per tax 

levy. . . . 8721,165.53 

Appropriations, Funded 

Debt account . . 172,000.00 
Received revenue from 

Waterworks . . 83,401.30 

Received National Bank 

and Corporation taxes 22,225.59 

Received from County 

Treasurer for Dog Li- 
censes . . . 2,710.90 
Balances from 1893 . . 100,083.73 
Received from all other 

sources . . . 56,643.95 

Expenditures . 81,072,987.72' 

Deficiency balances of 1893 596.67 

Unexpended balances to 

1895 . . . 82,550.05 

Excess and Deficiency . . 2,096.56 



81,158,231.00 $1,158,231.00 



The assets of the city available for the payment of its unfunded 
liabilities are as follows : — 

Cash 8 37,713.22 

Overlay and abatement ...... 4,073.85 

Real estate liens ....... 964.70 

Sewer assessments ....... 10,353.10 

Sidewalks assessments ...... 4,989.79 

State of Massachusetts, Burial of Indigent Soldiers 

• and Sailors ....... 157.50 

State of Massachusetts, Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 282.00 

State of Massachusetts, State aid . . . . 7,312.00 

Taxes 226,708.28 

Water Service assessments ..... 84.40 



Total am-ount of available assets . . . 8292,638.84 



80 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The liabilities are : — 

Fire Department, Central Fire Station 

Fire Department, Central Fire Station, equipment 
and furniture ...... 

Fire Department, chemical engine and equipment 

Fire Department, Hook and Ladder Station, Highland 
avenue ....... 

Fire Department, Hook and Ladder Station, equip- 
ment and furniture 

Highways, City Stable 

Overplus on Tax Sales 

Public Library 

Public Library Improvement . 

Reduction of Funded Debt 

Schoolhouse, Edgerly Addition 

Schoolhouse, English High 

Schoolhouse, High and English High, heating, venti 
lating and plumbing 

Schoolhouse, O. S. Knapp Addition 

Schoolhouse, Ward Four, south side F. R. R. 

Sewers, Construction 

Sundry Persons 

Temporary Loans . 

Water Maintenance 

Water Works Extension 

Total amount of unfunded liabilities 
Excess of available assets over unfunded liabilities 



6 3,713.57 

3,143.68 
50L47 

767.52 

31.00 

4,148.12 

102.13 

9.55 

3,000.00 

9,256.87 

619.48 

37,296.67 

7,202.72 

2,876.54 

54.51 

7,978.07 

1,890.10 

206,000.00 

311.01 

1,639.27 

$290,542.28 
2,096.56 

$292,638.84 



The financial condition of the city, exclusive of 
its public property, is as follows : 

City Loan Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. . $444,000.00 

" 4J per cent. . 233,000.00 

" " " " " " b " " . 165,000.00 



Amount carried forward . 



$842,000.00 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 81 

Amount brought forward ..... 8842,000.00 

City Loan Paviug Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. 90,000.00 

City Loan Sewer Bonds " " '' 4 '' '' 20,000.00 
City Loan Sewer Bonds bearing interest at 4^ per 

cent 17,000.00 

City Loan Sewer Bonds bearing interest at 5 per 

cent 35,000.00 

Water Loan Bonds bearing interest at 4 per cent. . 248,000.00 

'' " '' '' '' '' 5 '' " . 82,500.00 

" " " " " " bh per cent. . 10,000.00 
Total Funded Debt, city loan 81,004,000.00 
" " '' water loan 340,500.00 



61,344,500.00 



Total cash receipts for the year, including a balance 

of $53,488.07 from the year 1893 . . 81,705,670.15 

Total cash disbursements ..... 1,667,956.93 



Leaving in the treasury the sum of . . 837,713.22 

A detailed statement of the public propert}^, funded debt, and the 
receipts and disbursements of the various accounts will be found in the 
following appendix. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN F. COLE, 
Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S 

REPORT. 



TABLE A. 



PUBLIC PROPERTY DECEMBER 31, 1894. 



Central Hill land (13 acres, 5,032 feet) 

City Hall .... 812,000.00 

Furniture .... 3,000.00 

Public Library building . . . 25,000.00 

Public Library . . . 25,000.00 

Central Fire Station . . . 10,000.00 

Furniture .... 500.00 

Engine No. 1 and apparatus . 4,000.00 

Hose wagon and apparatus . 2,000.00 

High Schoolhouse .... 40,000.00 

Furniture .... 3,500.00 

Philosophical apparatus . . 500.00 

Prescott Schoolhouse, land (21,444 

feet) and building . . 45,000.00 

Furniture .... 2,000.00 

Luther V. Bell Schoolhouse, land 

(23,396 feet) and building . 45,000.00 

Furniture .... 2,000.00 



Amount carried forward 



$200,000.00 
15,000.00 
50,000.00 



16,500.00 



44,000.00 



47,000.00 



47,000.00 
$419,500.00 



84 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward ..... $419,500.00 

Forster Schoolhouse, land (27,499 

feet) and building •. . $45,000.00 

Furniture .... 2,000.00 

47,000.00 



Morse Schoolhouse, land (29,109 

feet) and building . . 45,000.00 

Furniture .... 2,000.00 



Edgerly Schoolhouse, land (26,428 

feet) and building . . 45.000.00 

Furniture .... 2,000.00 



Highland Schoolhouse, land (23,260 

feet) and building . . 46,837.19 

Furniture .... 2,000.00 



Charles G. Pope Schoolhouse, land 

(27,236 feet) and building . 60,000.00 
Furniture .... 2,000.00 



Jacob T. Glines Schoolhouse, land 

(28,800 feet) and building . 45,000.00 
Furniture . . . . 1,400.00 



O. S. Knapp Schoolhouse, land 

(24,517 feet) and building . 44,023.46 
Furniture . . . . 2,000.00 



Bingham Schoolhouse, land (21,017 

feet) and building . . 36,506.87 

Furniture .... 1,400.00 



Davis Schoolhouse, land (38,152 

feet) and building . . 25,000.00 

Furniture .... 700.00 



47,000.00 



47,000.00 



48,837.19 



62,000.00 



46,400.00 



46,023.46 



37,906.87 



25,700.00 



Amount carried forward ..... $827,367.52 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 85 

Amount brought forward ..... 8827,367.52 

George W. Durell Schoolhouse, land 

(13,883 feet) and building . S15,490.10 
Furniture .... 700.00 

16,190.10 



Cummings Schoolhouse, land (11,300 

feet) and building . . . 15,000.00 

Furniture .... 700.00 



Prospect Hill Schoolhouse, land 

(25,315 feet) and building . 20,000.00 
Furniture .... 1.000.00 



Lincoln Schoolhouse, land (17,662 

feet) and building . . 14,000.00 

Furniture .... 700.00 



Jackson Schoolhouse, land (11,212 

feet) and building . . 8,000.00 

Furniture .... 600.00 



Bennett Schoolhouse, land (20,560 

feet) and building . . 10,000.00 

Furniture .... 600.00 



Webster Schoolhouse, land (11,050 

feet) and building . . 8,000.00 

Furniture .... 600.00 



Harvard Schoolhouse, land (9,810 

feet) and building . . 3,500.00 

Furniture .... 100.00 



FrankHn Schoolhouse, land (33,017 

feet) and building . . 15,000.00 

Furniture .... 600.00 



15,700.00 



21,000.00 



14,700.00 



8,600.00 



10,600.00 



8,600.00 



3,600.00 



15,600.00 



Amount carried forward . .... $941,957.62 



86 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward .... $941,957.62 

Beech Street Schoolhouse, land (6,000 

feet) and building . . $4,500.00 

Furniture 300.00 

4,800.00 



Spring Hill Schoolhouse, land (4,991 

feet) and building . . . 1,500.00 

Furniture 100.00 



Burns Schoolhouse, land (16,080 feet) 

and building .... 15,000.00 

Furniture 700.00 



City Farm, land (10 acres, 12,523 

feet) 

Cedar Street Schoolhouse . 

Furniture ..... 

City Stables and dwelling-houses 
Equipments for highway repairs . 
Watering carts and sheds . 
No. 1 Fire Station, land (4,312 feet) 
and building .... 

Furniture ..... 

Hose wagon No. 1 and apparatus 

No. 2 Fire Station, land (5,400 feet) 
and building . 
Furniture ..... 
Hose wagon No. 2 and apparatus 

No. 3 Fire Station, land (5,226 feet) 

and building .... 

Furniture ..... 

Hose wagon No. 3 and apparatus 

Hook and ladder, truck and 

apparatus .... 

Amount carried forward . 



1,600.00 





15,700.00 
40,000.00 


700.00 




100.00 






800 00 




17,351.88 


. . . 


15,000.00 


. 


5,000.00 


2,500.00 




400.00 




1,500.00 


4 400 00 


8,000.00 


Tt , rr \J v/ . V V 


400.00 




1,500.00 


9 900 00 


9,000.00 


%J ^ \J \j \j •\J \j 


400.00 




1,500.00 




3,400.00 






14,300.00 




. . . 


$1,070,809.50 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



87 



Amount brought forward . . . . . 
No. 4 Fire Station, land (9,100 feet) 

and building . . . 812,000.00 

Furniture 400.00 

Engine No. 4 and apparatus . 4,000.00 

Combination wagon and appara- 
tus 2,500.00 

No. 5 Fire Station, land (39,456 feet) 

and building .... 16,000.00 

Furniture 400.00 

Hose wagon No. 5 and apparatus 1,500.00 

Hook and Ladder Station No. 2, land (9,902.7 square 

feet) and building, equipment and furniture 
(unfinished) ....... 

Central Fire Station, land (10,019 

feet) and building . . . 31,392.75 

Relief engine .... 3,000.00 

Two relief hose carriages . . 1,000.00 
One relief hook and ladder . 400.00 
Chemical Engine A and equip- 
ment 2,498.53 

Land for fire station. Ward One (8,279 square feet) 
Fire-alarm telegraph ...... 

Police Station, land (15,232 feet) and 

building .... 45,000.00 

Furniture 3,000.00 



Police-signal system and apparatus 

Prospect street, land (7,918 feet) and building 

Broadway Park (cost $212,993.20) . 

Joy street, land (2,960 feet) 

Walnut Hill, land (10,980 feet) 

Elm street, land (18,000 feet) . 



81,070,809.50 



18,900.00 



17,900.00 



12,951.48 



38,291.28 

6,000.00 

25,000.00 



48,000.00 
8,000.00 
7,000.00 
125,000.00 
500.00 
1,000.00 
6,000.00 



Amount carried forward 



$1,385,35 



88 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount bi'ought foriuard .... 
Holland street, land (5 acres, 6,806 feet) . 
Gravel land inWaltham (about 35 acres) . 
Gravel land in Wakefield (about 1 J acres) 
Gravel land rear North street (about 5y^^ acres) 
Nathan Tufts Park (about ^-f-^-^ acres) unfinished 
Somerville Water Works cost .... 
Oliver street, land (63,069 feet) 
Whipple street, land (15,240 feet) . . . 

English High Schoolhouse (unfinished) 
High and English High Schoolhouses, heating, venti 
lating and plumbing (unfinished) . 

Total amount of public property . 



M ,385,352.26 

20,000.00 

15,000.00 

5,000.00 

4,000.00 

47,649.28 

635,969.49 

7,500.00 

800.00 

46,203.33 

27,797.28 

52,195,271.64 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



89 



TABLE B. 
FUNDED DEBT DECEMBER 31, 1894. 

CITY LOAN BONDS. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 


\ When Due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


January 1, 1892 


1,244 to 1,253 


4 


Jan. 1,1895 


§1,000 


% 10,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,582 to 1,592 


4 


July 1,1895 


1,000 


11,000 


October 1,1876 


190 to 194 


5 


Oct. 1,1895 


1,«00 


25,000 


October 1,1876 


195 to 334 


5 


Oct. 1,1895 


1,000 


140,000 


October 1,1889 


939 to 943 


4 


Oct. 1,1895 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1,1890 


1,043 to 1,052 


4 


Oct.1,1895 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1,1890 


1,119 to 1,122 


4 


Oct. 1,1895 


1,000 


4,000 


October 1,1891 


1,168 to 1,174 


4 


Oct.1,1895 


1,000 


7,000 


October 1,1893 


1,349 to 1,372 


4i 


Oct.1,1895 


1,000 


24,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,593 to 1,601 


4 


July 1,1896 


1,000 


9,000 


January 1,1892 


1,254 to 1,263 


4 


Jan. 1,1896 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1,1889 


944 to 948 


4 


Oct. 1,1896 


1,000 


5,000 


October 1,1 890 


1,053 to 1,062 


4 


Oct. 1,1896 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1,1890 


1,123 to 1,126 


4 


Oct. 1,1896 


1,000 


4,000 


October 1,1891 


1,175 to 1,181 


4 


Oct. 1,1896 


1,000 


7,000 


October 1,1893 


1,373 to 1,396 


4-i- 
2 


Oct. 1,1896 


1,000 


24,000 


January 1,1892 


1,264 to 1,273 


4"^ 


Jan. 1,1897 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1888 


910 to 913 


4 


July 1,1897 


1,000 


4,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,602 to 1,610 


4 


Julyl, 1897 


1,000 


9,000 


October 1,1889 


949 to 969 


4 


Oct.1,1897 


1,000 


21,000 


October 1,1890 


1,063 to 1,072 


4 


Oct. 1,1897 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1,1890 


1,127 to 1,130 


4 


Oct.1,1897 


1,000 


4,000 


October 1,1891 


1,182 to 1,188 


4 


Oct.1,1897 


1,000 


7,000 


October 1,1893 


1,397 to 1,420 


41 
2" 


Oct.1,1897 


1,000 


24,000 


January 1,1892 


1,274 to 1,283 


4 


Jan. 1,1898 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,611 to 1,619 


4 


July 1,1898 


1,000 


9,000 


October 1,1889 


970 to 993 


4 


Oct. 1,1898 


1,000 


24,000 


Amount 


carried forwar 


d . 






$437,000 













90 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE B. — CITY LOAN BONDS.— C^«/2«z^^fl'. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest 


When Due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


Amount 


b ro ugh tfo rwa r 
1,073 to 1,082 


d . 






$437,000 


October 1,1890 


4 


Oct. 1,1898 


$1,000 


10,000 


October 1,1890 


1,131 to 1,134 


4 


Oct.l 


,1898 


1,000 


4,000 


October 1,1891 


1,189 to 1,195 


4 


Oct. 1 


,1898 


1,000 


7,000 


October 1,1893 


1,421 to 1,444 


4^ 


Oct. 1 


,1898 


1,000 


24,000 


January 1, 1892 


1,284 to 1,293 


4 


Jan. 1 


,1899 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,620 to 1,628 


4 


Julyl 


,1899 


1,000 


9,000 


October 1,1889 


994 to 1,002 


4 


Oct.l 


,1899 


1,000 


9,000 


October 1,1890 


1,083 to 1,092 


4 


Oct.l 


,1899 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1,1890 


1,135 to 1,138 


4 


Oct.l 


1899 


1,000 


4,000 


October 1,1891 


1,196 to 1,202 


4 


Oct.l. 


1899 


1,000 


7,000 


October 1,1893 


1,445 to 1,468 


41 
^2, 


Oct.l^ 


1899 


1,000 


24,000 


January 1,1892 


1,294 to 1,303 


4 


Jan. 1. 


1900 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,629 to 1,637 


4 


Julyl 


,1900 


1,000 


9,000 


October 1,1890 


1,093 to 1,102 


4 


Oct.l, 


1900 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1,1890 


1,139 to 1,142 


4 


Oct.l, 


1900 


1,000 


4,000 


October 1,1891 


1,203 to 1,208 


4 


Oct.l 


1900 


1,000 


6,000 


October 1,1893 


1,469 to 1,492 


4i 
^2 


Oct.l. 


1900 


1,000 


24,000 


January 1,1892 


1,304 to 1,313 


4 


Jan. 1, 


1901 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,638 to 1,646 


4 


Julyl, 


1901 


1,000 


9,000 


October 1,1890 


1,143 to 1,146 


4 


Oct.l, 


1901 


1,000 


4,000 


October 1,1891 


1,209 to 1,211 


4 


Oct.l, 


1901 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1,1893 


1,493 to 1,516 


4i 
2 


Oct.l, 


1901 


1,000 


24,000 


January 1, 1892 


1,314 to 1,323 


4 


Jan. 1, 


1902 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,647 to 1,655 


4 


July 1, 


1902 


1,000 


9,000 


October 1,1891 


1,212 to 1,214 


4 


Oct.l, 


1902 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1,1893 


1,517 to 1,546 


4i 
2 


Oct.l, 


1902 


1,000 


30,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,656 to 1,664 


4 


July 1, 


1903 


1,000 


9,000 


October 1,1891 


1,215 to 1,217 


4 


Oct.l, 


1903 


1,000 


3,000 


Octoberl,1893 


1,547 to 1,581 


4i 

2 


Oct.l, 


1903 


1,000 


35,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,665 to 1,673 
canHed foi'wai' 


4 

d . 


Julyl, 


1904 


1,000 


9,000 


Amount 




$776,000 











APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



91 



TABLE B. — CITY LOAN ^O^DS.—Co7ichided. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest 


When Due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


Amount 


b ro ugh t forwar 


d . 


• « • • 


... 


8776,000 


Octoberl,1891 


1,218 to 1,220 


4 


Oct.1,1904 


81,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,674 to 1,679 


4 


July 1,1905 


1,000 


6,000 


October 1,1891 


1,221 to 1,223 


4 


Oct. 1,1905 


1,000 


3,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,680 to 1,685 


4 


July 1,1906 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,686 to 1,691 


4 


July 1,1907 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,692 to 1,697 


4 


July 1,1908 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,698 to 1,703 


4 


July 1,1909 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,704 to 1,709 


4 


Tulyl,1910 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1894 


l,710to 1,715 


4 


July 1,1911 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,716 to 1,721 


4 


July 1,1912 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,722 to 1,727 


4 


July 1,1913 


1,000 


6,000 


July 1, 1894 


1,728 to 1,733 


4 


Julyl, 1914 


1,000 


6,000 


Total 


amount of City 


Loan 


Bonds . 




8842,000 



y^ 


ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE B. — Continued. 

SEWER LOAN BONDS. 






DATE. 


Number of Bonds 


Rate pei 
cent, of 
Interest 


When Due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


July 1, 1876 


1 to 7 


5 


July 1, 1896 


$5,000 


$35,000 


July 1, 1894 


54 


4 


July 1, 1895 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


37 


4i 

2 


Oct. 1, 1895 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


55 


4^ 


July 1, 1896 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


38 


4i 

2 


Oct. 1, 1896 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


56 


4 


July 1, 1897 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


39 


4i 

2 


Oct. 1, 1897 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


57 


4 


July 1, 1898 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


40 


4i 

*2 


Oct. \, 1898 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


58 


4 


July 1, 1899 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


41 


4i 

2 


Oct. 1, 1899 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


59 


4 


July 1, 1900 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


42 


^2" 


Oct. 1, 1900 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


60 


4 


July 1, 1901 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


43 


41 
2 


Oct. 1, 1901 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


61 


4 


July 1, 1902 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


44 


41 
^2 


Oct. 1, 1902 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


62 


4 


July 1, 19U3 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


45 


41 

2" 


Oct. 1, 1903 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


63 


4 


July 1, 1904 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


46 


4i 


Oct. 1, 1904 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


64 


4 


July 1, 1905 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


47 


^ 


Oct. 1, 1905 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


•65 


4 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


48 


4i 
2 


Oct. 1, 1906 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 -II 


^^ 


4^ 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


49 


41 
^2^ 


Oct. 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


July 1, 1894 


67 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1893 


50 
carried for 


4i 
2 

ward 


Oct. 1, 1908 


1,000 


1,000 


Amount 


$63,000 









APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 93 

TABLE B. — SEWER LOAN ^O^DS.— Conchcded. 



DATE. 



Avioimt 
July \, 1894 
October 1, 1893 
July 1, 1894 
October 1, 1893 
July 1, 1894 
October 1, 1893 
July \, 1894 
July 1, 1894 
July 1, 1894 

Total 







Rate per 


Number of Bonds. 


cent, of 






Interest. 


brought 


for 


ward 


68 




4 


51 




4i 


69 




4 


52 




4^ 


70 




4 


53 




41 


71 




4 


72 




4 


73 




4 


amoznit 


of 


Sewer 



When Due. 



Denomi- 
nation. 



Amount. 



July 1, 1909 
Oct. 1, 1909 , 
July 1, 1910 I 
Oct. 1, 1910 I 
July 1, 1911 
Oct. 1, 1911 
July 1, 1912 
July 1, 1913 
July 1, 1914 

Loa7i Bonds 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



863,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



$72,000 



(7) 



94 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE B. 

WATER LOAN BONDS. 







Rate pe 


r 







DATE. 


Number of Bonds 


. cent, of 
Interest 

4 


When Due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


July 1, 1888 


284 


July 1, 1895 


S1,000 


% 1,000 


July 1, 1882 


112 to 124 


5 


July 1, 1895 


1,000 


13,000 


October 1, 1889 


318 to 320 


4 


Oct. 1, 1895 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


401 to 402 


4 


Oct. 1, 1895 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1882 


125 to 136 


5 


July 1, 1896 


1,000 


12,000 


July 1, 1882 


137 


5 


Jdy 1, 1896 


500 


500 


July 1, 1888 


285 


4 


July 1, 1896 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


321 to 323 


4 


Oct. 1, 1896 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


403 to 404 


4 


Oct. 1, 1896 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1882 


138 to 151 


5 


July 1, 1897 


1,000 


14,000 


July 1, 1888 


286 


4 


July 1, 1897 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


324 to 326 


4 


Oct. 1, 1897 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


405 to 406 


4 


Oct. 1, 1897 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1882 


152 to 166 


5 


July 1, 1898 


1,000 


15,000 


July 1, 1888 


287 


4 


July 1, 1898 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


327 to 329 


4 


Oct. 1, 1898 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


407 to 408 


4 


Oct. 1, 1898 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1882 


167 to 181 


5 


July 1, 1899 


1,000 


15,000 


July 1, 1882 


182 


5 


July 1, 1899 


500 


500 


July 1, 1888 


288 


4 


July 1, 1899 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


330 to 342 


4 


Oct. 1, 1899 


1,000 


13,000 


October 1, 1890 


409 to 410 


4 


Oct. \, 18<99 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1882 


183 to 194 


5 


July 1, 1900 


1,000 


12,000 


July 1, 1882 


195 


5 


July 1, 1900 


500 


500 


July 1, 1888 


289 


4 


July 1, 1900 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1884 


200 to 202 


4 


Oct. 1, 1900 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1889 


343 to 344 


4 


Oct. 1, 1900 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890 


416 to 417 


4 


Oct. 1, 1900 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1892 


M48toa458 
carried for 


4 

ward 


Oct. 1, 1900 


1,000 


11,000 


Amount 


$141,500 









APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 95 

TABLE B. — WATER LOAX ^OSD^.— Continued. 



DATE. 


Number of Bonds. 


Rate per 
cent, of 
Interest. 

li'dJ'd 


When Due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


Amount. 


A DlOllIlt 


brought for 
290 






S141 500 


^ M / f IfK/ *-*' fit' 

July 1, 1888 


4 


July 1, 1901 


31,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1884 


203 to 212 


4 


Oct. 1, 1901 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1, 1892 


^459 to 468 


4 


Oct. 1, 1901 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1885 


214 to 219 


4 


July 1, 1901 


1,000 


6,000 


October 1, 1889 


345 to 346 


4 


Oct. 1, 1901 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890 


418 to 419 


4 


Oct. 1, 1901 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1885 


220 to 226 


4 


July 1, 1902 


1,U00 


7,000 


July 1, 1886 


229 to 238 


4 


July 1, 1902 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1, 1889 


347 to 348 


4 


Oct. 1, 1902 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890 


420 to 421 


4 


Oct. 1, 1902 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1892 


469 to 475 


4 


Oct. 1, 1902 


1,000 


7,000 


July 1, 1886 


239 to 256 


4 


July 1, 1903 


1,000 


, 18,000 


October 1, 1889 


349 to 350 


4 


Oct. 1, 1903 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890 


448 to 449 


4 


Oct. 1, 1903 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1886 


257 to 266 


4 


July 1, 1904 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1, 1889 


351 to 352 


4 


Oct. 1, 1904 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1890 


450 to 451 


4 


Oct. 1, 1904 


1,000 


2,000 


October 1, 1889 


353 to 355 


4 


Oct. 1, 1905 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


452 to 453 


4 


Oct. 1, 1905 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1876 


30 to 31 


'H 


July 1, 1906 


1,000 


10,000 


October 1, 1889 


356 to 358 


4 


Oct. 1, 1906 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


454 to 455 


4 


Oct. 1, 1906 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1886 


267 to 276 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


10,000 


July 1, 1888 


291 


4 


July 1, 1907 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


359 to 361 


4 


Oct. 1, 1907 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


456 to 457 


4 


Oct. 1, 1907 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888 


292 


4 


July 1, 1908 


1,000 \ 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


362 to 364 


4 


Oct. 1, 1908 ' 


1,000 


3,000 


October 1, 1890 


458 to 459 


4 


Oct. 1, 1908 


1,000 


2,000 


July 1, 1888 


293 


4 


July 1, 1909 


1,000 


1,000 


October 1, 1889 


365 to 367 


4 


Oct. 1, 1909 


1,000 ' 


3,000 


AniotLiit \ 


carried for 


zvard 






S282,500 











96 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TABLE B. — WATER LOAN B01<ir)^.— Concluded. 



DATE. 



Amount 
October 1, 1890 
July 1, 1888 
October 1, 1889 
October 1, 1890 
July 1, 1888 
October 1, 1889 
October 1, 1890 
July 1, 1888 
October 1, 1889 
October 1, 1890 
July 1, 1888 
October 1, 1889 
October 1, 1890 
July 1, 1888 
October 1, 1889 
October 1, 1891 
July 1, 1888 
October 1, 1889 
October 1, 1890 
July 1, 1888 
October 1, 1889 
October 1, 1890 
July 1, 1888 
October 1, 1889 
October 1, 1890 
July 1, 1888 
October 1, 1889 
October 1, 1890 
October 1, 1889 
October 1, 1890 
October 1, 1890 
Total 





Rate per 


Number of Bonds 


cent, of 




Interest. 


brought for 


ward 


423 to 424 


4 


294 


4 


368 to 370 


4 


426 to 427 


4 


295 


4 


371 to 373 


4 


428 to 429 


4 


296 


4 


374 to 376 


4 


430 to 431 


4 


297 


4 


377 to 379 


4 


432 to 433 


4 


298 


4 


380 to 382 


4 


434 to 435 


4 


299 


4 


383 to 384 


4 


436 to 437 


4 


300 


4 


385 to 386 


4 


438 to 439 


4 


301 


4 


387 to 388 


4 


440 to 441 


4 


302 


4 


389 to 390 


4 


442 to 443 


4 


391 to 392 


4 


444 to 445 


4 


446 to 447 


4 


amotnit of 


Water 



When Due. 



Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
July 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 



1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1915 
1915 
1915 
1916 
1916 
1916 
1917 
1917 
1917 
1918 
1918 
1918 
1919 
1919 
1920 



Loan Bonds 



Denomi- 
nation. 



$1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



Amount. 

$282,500 
2,000 
1,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 

$340,500 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



97 



TABLE B. — Contimied. 
CITY LOAN PAVING BONDS. 



DATE. 



October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 
October 1 



1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 
1892 

Total 





Rate per 


Number of Bonds. 


cent, of 




Interest. 

4 


11 to 15 


16 to 20 


4 


21 to 25 


4 


26 to 30 


4 


31 to 35 


4 


36 to 40 


4 


41 to 45 


4 


46 to 50 


4 


51 to 55 


4 


56 to 60 


4 


61 to 65 


4 


m to 70 


4 


71 to 75 


4 


76 to 80 


4 


81 to 85 


4 


86 to 90 


4 


91 to 95 


4 


96 to 100 


4 


amount of 


Pav 



Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 

ing Bonds 



Due. 


Denomi- 
nation. 


1895 


$1,000 


1896 


1,000 


1897 


1,000 


1898 


1,000 


1899 


1,000 


1900 


1,000 


1901 


1,000 


1902 


1,000 


1903 


1,000 


1904 


1,000 


1905 


1,000 


1906 


1,000 


1907 


1,000 


1908 


1,000 


1909 


1,000 


1910 


1,000 


1911 


1,000 


1912 
is . 


1,000 



Amount. 

$5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

$90,000 



RFXAPITULATION. 



City Loan Bonds 
Sewer Loan Bonds . 
Water Loan Bonds 
City Loan Paving Bonds 



Total amount of Funded Debt 



$842,000 

72,000 

340,500 

90,000 

$1,344,500 



98 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE C. 



STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS SHOWING APPROPRIATIONS, 
EXPENDITURES, ETC., TO DECEMBER 31, 1894. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 

Credit. 

Taxes, amount assessed 
Property and Debt balance 



Debit. 

Fire Department . . . . 

Fire Department, Central Fire Station 

Fire Department, Central Fire Station, 
Electrical Apparatus and Furni- 
ture . . . . . 

Fire Department, Chemical Engine 
and Equipment 

Fire Department, Hook and Ladder 
station. Highland Avenue 

Fire Department, Hook and Ladder 
Station, Tlighland Avenue, 
Equipment, etc. 

Fire Department, Land for Fire Station, 
Ward One 

Health Department . 

Highways .... 

Highways, City Stable 

Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 
• Interest . . . . . 

Miscellaneous .... 

Nathan Tufts Park . 

Police . . . ... 

Amounts carried forward . 



S628,500.00 
172,000.00 

$800,500.00 



543,000.00 
26,000.00 



5,250.00 

3,000.00 

10,000.00 

3,750.00 

6,000.00 
12,000.00 
60,000.00 
14,500.00 
500.00 
65,000.00 

6,600.00 
15,000.00 
25,000.00 

^295,600.00 $800,500.00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



99 



A moun ts bi'ough t forwa rd 
Police Station IncideDtals 
Printing and Stationery 
Public Grounds 
Public Library 
Public Library Improvement 
Reduction of Funded Debt 
Relief and Burial of Indigent Soldiers 

and Sailors 
Salaries ..... 
School Contingent 

School Contingent, Janitors' Salarie 
School Fuel .... 
Schoolhouse, Bingham Addition 
Schoolhouse, Edgerly Addition . 
Schoolhouse, High and English High, 

Heating, Ventilating and 

Plumbing 
Schoolhouse Incidentals 
Schoolhouse, O. S. Knapp Addition 
Schoolhouse in Ward Four, south 

side Fitchburg R. R. 
School Teachers' Salaries . 
Sewers, Construction 
Sewers, Maintenance 
Sidewalks . . . 

Street Lights 
Support of Poor 
Watering Streets 



8295,600.00 
3,500.00 
6,500.00 
4,500.00 
6,500.00 
3,000.00 
100,000.00 

4,000.00 

35,400.00 

16,000.00 

11,000.00 

9,000.00 

1,000.00 

2,000.00 



35,000.00 
12,000.00 
15,500.00 

12,000.00 

125,000.00 

20,000.00 

7,000.00 

10,000.00 

44,000.00 

15,000.00 

7,000.00 



8800,500.00 



8800,500.00 



CASH. 

Credit. 

County of Middlesex 

Fire Department .... 

Fire Department, Central Fire Station 



834,317.59 
48,098.48 
22,286.43 



Amount candied foj'wai'd 



8104,702.50 



100 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought fo7'ward 
Fire Department, Central Fire Station, Electrical Ap 

paratus and Furniture .... 
Fire Department, ('hemical Engine and Equipment 
Fire Department, Hook and Ladder Station, High 

land Avenue 
Fire Department, Hook and Ladder Station, High 

land Avenue, Equipment, etc 
Fire Department,. Land for Fire Station, Ward One 
Funded Debt 
Health Department 
Highways 

Highways, City Stable 
Highways, Paving Washington Street 
Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 
Interest 
Miscellaneous 
Nathan Tufts Park 
Police .... 
Police Station Incidentals 
Printing and Stationery . 
Public Grounds 
Public Library 

Relief and Burial of Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 
Salaries 

School Contingent 

School Contingent, Janitors' Salaries 
School Fuel . .... 

Schoolhouse, Bingham Addition 
Schoolhouse, Edgerly Addition 
Schoolhouse, English High 
Schoolhouse, High and English High, Heating, Ven 

tilating and Plumbing . 
Schoolhouse Incidentals 
Schoolhouse, O. S. Knapp Addition 
Schoolhouse, Ward Four, south side Fitchburg R. R 



$104,702.50 

2,106.32 
2,498.53 

9,232.48 

3,719.00 

6,000.00 

107,000.00 

17,917.73 

68,298.58 

10,820.04 

406.91 

592.00 

52,809.42 

13,732.11 

.17,655.28 

50,323.39 

4,966.80 

6,177.79 

4,705.94 

9,557.93 

5,630.06 

38,045.03 

16,026.10 

10,686.13 

8,948.12 

9,206.87 

1,837.19 

44,185.33 

27,797.28 
15,122.39 
12,623.46 
16,190.10 



Amount carried forward 



$699,520.81 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



101 



Amount drought forward 
School Teachers' Salaries 
Sewers, Construction 
Sewers, Maintenance 
Sidewalks . . . 

State Aid 

State of Massachusetts 
State of Massachusetts, Metropolitan Sewer . 
State of Massachusetts, Non-resident Bank Stock 
Street Lights . 
Sundry Persons 
Support of Poor 
Temporary Loans . 
Water Loan Interest 
Water Maintenance 
Water Services 
Watering Streets 
Water Works Extension 
Balance to debit in account 1895 



6699,520.81 

128,779.39 

25,191.29 

7,260.05 

19,837.22 

7,451.00 

31,380.00 

22,230.79 

847.80 

42,955.84 

592.50 

19,733.13 

563,800.00 

15,100.00 

31,936.90 

6,131.58 

14,975.57 

30,233.06 

37,713.22 

81,705,670.15 



Debit. 



Balance from 1893 

City of Boston, Water Rates 

Fire Department 

Funded Debt . 

Health Department . 

Highways . 

Highways, City Stable 

Interest 

Miscellaneous . 

Nathan Tufts Park . 

Overlay and Abatement 

Police 

Police Station Incidentals 



$53,488.07 

83,401.30 

136.74 

172,000.00 

475.19- 

8,789.77 

468.16 

14,768.27 

4,789.86 

6.00 

19.60 

28,031.84 

307.00 



Amou7its carried forward 



8366,681.80 81,705,670.15 



102 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 


. $366,681.80 $1,705,670.15 


Public Grounds 


18.00 


Public Library 


3,044.12 


Reduction of Funded Debt 


4,858.50 


Relief and Burial of Indigent Sc 


)ldiers 


and Sailors . . 


50.00 


School Contingent 




174.23 


School Fuel 




26.75 


Schoolhouse Incidentals . 




112.80 


School Teachers' Salaries 




24.00 


Sewer Assessments 




11,359.93 


Sewers, Construction 




1,033.50 


Sewers, Maintenance 




95.33 


Sidewalks 




88.34 


Sidewalk Assessments 




9,430.97 


State Aid . 




15.00 


State of Masssfchusetts, Burial ( 


3f In- 


digent Soldiers and Sailo 


rs . 17.50 


State of Massachusetts, Indigen 


t Sol- 


diers and Sailors 


374.50 


State of Massachusetts, State Aic 


1 . 6,736.00 / 


Street Lights 


165.00 


Support of Poor 


3,368.64 


Taxes .... 


. 730,199.17 


Temporary Loans 


550,000.00 


Water Maintenance . 


196.93 


Water Services 


737.48 


Water Service Assessments 


6,978.25 


Watering Streets 


8,026.02 


Water Works Extension 


1,857.39 




<£i 705 fi70 1 5 


" 


«iPl,l\Jt^,UlV/.J.t/ 



CITY OF BOSTON, WATER RATES. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of City of Boston, return on water 
rates . . . ..... 



$83,401.30 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



103 



Amount drought forward . . . . . 

Debit. 

Water Maintenance, amount trans- 
ferred S32,r)00.00 

Water Works Extension, amount trans- 
ferred 30,000.00 

Water Loan Interest, amount trans- 
ferred ..... 15,415.00 

Reduction of Funded Debt, amount 

transferred .... 5,486.30 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 



883,401.30 



883,401.30 



Taxes, amount assessed 



Cash, paid Countv Tax 



Credit, 



Debit. 



834,317.59 



834,317.59 



EXCESS AND DEFICIENCY. 

Credit. 

Highways, credit balance of account .... S 491.19 
Indigent Soldiers and Sailors, credit balance of ac- 
count 204.00 

Interest, credit balance of account .... 25,586.80 

Police, credit balance of account .... 2,708.45 

Printing and Stationery, credit balance of account . 322.21 

School Contingent, credit balance of account . . 148.13 
School Contingent, Janitors' Salaries, credit balance 

of account . . . .... 313.87 

School Fuel, credit balance of account . . . 78.63 
Schoolhouse, Bingham Addition, credit balance of 

account ........ 83.13 



Amount carried forward 



829,936.41 



104 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

A77iount brought forzvard 
Sidewalks, credit balance of account . 
Street Lights, credit balance of account 
Watering Streets, credit balance of account 



Debit. 

Fire Department, debit balance of ac- 
count ..... 

Health Department, debit balance of 
account ..... 

Highways, Paving Washington Street, 
debit balance of account 

Miscellaneous, debit balance of account 

Nathan Tufts Park, debit balance of 
account ..... 

Police Station Incidentals, debit bal- 
ance of account 

Public Grounds, debit balance of 
account ..... 

Relief and Burial of Indigent Soldiers 
and Sailors, debit balance of 
account ..... 

Salaries, debit balance of account 

Schoolhouse Incidentals, debit balance 
of account .... 

School Teachers' Salaries, debit balance 
of account .... 

Sewers Maintenance, debit balance of 
account ..... 

Support of Poor, debit balance of ac- 
count ..... 

Balance to credit in account 1895 



. 


$29,936.41 


. 


36.76 


. 


1,209.16 


t 


50.45 




$31,232.78 


S4,961.74 




5,442.54 




406.91 




2,333.90 




2,264.11 




559.80 




187.94 




1,440.06 




2,645.03 




3,609.59 




3,755.39 




164.72 




1,364.49 




2,096.56 






$31,232.78 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



105 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received of Star Brass ]Manufac- 
turing Co., old materials . 
Lorenzo W. Dow, manure . 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rebate on tolls 
F. D. Weld, discount on bill 
F. W. CuUiton, discount on bill . 

Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to debit in account 



Debit 

Cash, paid James R. Hopkins, chief 
engineer 
Nathaniel C. Barker, assistant en- 
gineer 

Henry Byrnes, steamer engineer 
L. D. Bixby, steamer engineer 
Wm. A. Burbank, assistant steam 

er engineer 
Irving C. Jackson, driver 
Edward Ring, driver . 
Thomas Daley, driver 
Charles Trull, driver . 
Samuel F. Stevens, driver 
Melvin C. Ricker, driver 
George F. Harris, driver 
John Gillooley, driver 
Charles H. Stearns, driver 
William H. Perry, driver 
Benjamin H. Pond, driver 

Amounts carried forward 



843,000.00 



$66.64 
19.00 

1.50 
5.85 



81,650.00 

600.00 
1,140.00 
1,140.00 

999.96 
999.96 
999.96 
999.96 
916.63 
999.96 
999.96 
999.96 
999.96 
999.96 
833.30 
420.61 

$15,700.18 



136.74 

4,961.74 

1 

848,098.48 



848,098.48 



106 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts drought forward . 
Horace W. Hutchins, driver 
Clarence V. Cook, driver 
Wm. H. Whitcomb, driver . 
Edwin T. Trefren, ladder man 
Richard F. Clarkson, ladderraan 
Frank H. Hersey, hoseman 
Arthur H. Oilman, hoseman 
Oscar P. Sheltus, substitute driver 
James I. King, substitute driver . 
Wallace Tucker, substitute driver 
Joseph H.Cribby, substitute driver 
Watson H. Davis, substitute driver 
Oeorge L. Blackbird, janitor 
Steamer Company No. 1, callmen 
Steamer Company No. 4, callmen 
Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, 

callmen .... 
Hose Company No. 1, callmen 
Hose Company No. 2, '^ 
Hose Company No. 3, '^ 
Hose Company No. 5, '' 
Benjamin H. Daley, hoseman 
F. A. Blackburn, lineman 
Frank Draper, ^'■ 

James L. Prentiss, '' 
Frank Nicholson, '' 
Wm. J. Logan, labor . 
Charles E. Shaw, labor 
Arthur C. Sellon, labor 
James E. Thompson, labor 
Oeorge Vannum, labor 
Charles A. Sputhwick, labor 
James D. Perkins, Jr., labor 
Alfred R. Higgins, labor 
Fred F. Young, labor 



$15,700.18 

174.00 

140.00 

40.64 

54.19 

780.00 

780.00 

780.00 

245.42 

234.82 

27.10 

28.00 

28.00 

600.00 

1,166.00 

1,082.00 

1,692.00 

1,112.00 

1,122.00 

1,137.84 

1,132.00 

373.50 

408.28 

417.00 

558.92 

33.00 

7.00 

7.50 

2.50 

5.00 

2.50 

2.50 

9.00 

4.00 

4.00 



$48,098.48 



Amounts ca rried fo i"wa rd 



$29,890.89 



$48,098.48 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



107 



Amounts brought forwa7'd 

John E. Hill, labor 

Walter E. Hill, labor . 

Martin F. Lacey, labor 

John Frizzell, labor 

Charles W. Ferguson, labor 

G. W. Bridges, labor 

Harry Clifford, labcr 

Melville Webber, labor 

Harry Spike, labor 

Martin Griscoll, labor 

George Hill, labor 

James E. Gould, labor 

Walter Young, labor 

John Regan, labor 

Amos Page, labor 

Charles Adams, labor 

John H. Cuddy, labor 

Thomas F. Culliton, horseshoeing 

Cadogan Brothers, horseshoeing 

W. H. Richardson, horseshoeing 

H. Clement, horseshoeing . 

Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing 

Seward Dodge, horseshoeing 

C. W. Ingalls, horseshoeing 

Lawrence Barrett, horseshoeing 

E. E. Olney & Co., horseshoeing 

Charles L. Underhill, blacksrnith- 

ing 

Jacob Woodbury, biacksmithing . 
H. S. Brackett, carpentering 
Fuller & Matthews, carpentering 
G. D. B. Robinson, carpentering . 
Elijah Walker, carpentering 
Horace P. Ewell, carpentering 
J. F. Burton, painting 



629,890.89 

7.50 

2.00 

5.00 

.5.00 

2.50 

114.77 

76.51 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1 .00 

7.50 

7.00 

1.00 

1.00 

6.00 

70.50 

58.20 

142.68 

58.80 

64.27 

68.26 

275.00 

22.55 

5.50 

4.30 

55.90 
8.50 
42.60 
22.04 
278.38 
73.89 
13.80 
12.00 



848,098.48 



Amounts canied forwai'd 



$31,407.84 



$48,098.48 



108 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . 
George Wickes, painting 

C. Casseau, painting 

H. N. Johnson, painting 
J. Q. Twombly, painting 
Charles Berry, harness work 
Hill & Hill, harness work . 
F. Ivers & Son, harness work 

E. Spalding, harness work . 

D. J. Bennett, harness work 
P. Manley, harness work 

F. L. Thompson, harness work . 
Cornelius Callahan Co., harness 

work, etc. .... 

American Fire Engine Co., repairs 
of apparatus .... 

Scrannage Bros., repairs of appa- 
ratus ..... 

Frank W. Leavitt, repairs of ap- 
paratus . . . . 

I. D. Walker, repairs of apparatus 

E. Teel & Co., repairs of appa- 
ratus ...... 

William T. Henderson, wagon 
George M. Starbird, removing 
tower ..... 
J. M. Burckes & Son, mason work 
Thomas Preston, mason work 
L. C. Seavey, roofing 
H. W. Covell, plumbing 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 
J. B. Dupont, plumbing 
George H. Maynard, plumbing 
Charles A. Holmes, plumbing 
John A. Merrifield, plumbing 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 

Amounts carried forward . 



$31,407.84 

125.00 

15.00 

4.88 

122.08 

100.25 

112.16 

16.00 

48.65 

35.20 

10.85 

2.75 

522.25 



848,098.48 



126.45 




24.03 




288.25 




61.70 




26.60 




165.00 




100.00 




46.00 




20.00 




43.30 




9.77 




31.45 




18.98 




7.89 




19.28 




.50 




62.69 




$33,574.80 


$48,098.48 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



109 



Amounts brought forward . . 833,574.80 

W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware . 46.23 

W. Irving Heald, hardware . 10.59 

W. L. Snow, hardware . . 1.75 

J. A. Litchfield, oil . . . . 8.65 

W. H. Ballard, oil . . . 11.15 

Samuel Walker & Co., oil . . 2.94 

Victor Oil Co., oil . . . 5.60 

John P. Squire Co., oil . . 37.11 

Revere Rubber Co., hose . . 145.35 

Boston Belting Co., hose . . 472.25 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber 

Co., hose .... 116.62 
A. S. Jackson, repairs of hose, etc. 183.15 
James Tragutha, hose couplings . 7.00 
Pettingill, Andrews & Co., elec- 
trical supplies . . . 297.02 
N. E. Gamewell Co., electrical 

supplies .... 1,075.55 
Gillis & Gleeson, electrical sup- 
plies ..... 18.75 
Fitz, Dana & Co., electrical sup- 
plies ..... 99.55 
Eastern Electric Cable Co., elec- 
trical supplies . . . 46.51 

E. I. Braddock, electrical supplies 11.58 
Charles L. BIy, electrical supplies 81.18 
Municipal Fire & Police Tele- 
graph Co., electrical supplies . 20.00 

Edes Mfg. Co., zincs . . 81.00 

Union Glass Co., battery jars . 17.40 

J. A. & W. Bird & Co., vitriol . 310.40 
Cochran Chemical Co., vitriol . " 23.21 

Braman, Dow & Co., pipe . 23.36 

F. E. Fitts Mfg. & Supply Co., 

ash cans .... 38.86 

Amounts carried foi'ward . . 636,767.56 

(8) 



848,098.48 



848,098.48 



no 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought foriuai'd . 
Boston Bolt Co., bolts 
L. A. Wright, bolts 
Birch Brothers, wrench 
Davis, Stebbins & Co., wrench 
F. D. Hicks & Son, brakes 



Extin 



Co 



Somerville Iron Foundry 

grates 
Automatic Fire Alarm & 

guisher Co., supplies 
H. W. Burgess, supplies 
James Bartley, supplies 
J. A. Durell, supplies 
William F. Low, oil 
Ho\ve & Flint, hardware 
F. C. Fuller & Son, hardware 
Francis S. Brown, tarine 
Farnham & Steel, shinos 
W. G. Hallock, sponges 
J. E. Phipps, grease . 
Leander Barber, brooms 
Elias Lathrop, ointment 

E. F. Chaffee, liniment 
George H. Cowdin, drugs 
John G. Lesure, drugs 
Smith & Gould, drugs 
Star Manufacturing Co., soap 
Holtzer-Cabot Electric Co 
S. F. Hay ward & Co., charging 

extinguishers 

F. D. Weld, shavings 
F. C. Aver, Agt., lumber 
W. P. Rice, lumber 
I. H. Brown & Co., lumber 
Fred Davis, whitew^ashing 
J. W. Johnson, stove pipe 



bell 



S36,767.56 

29.20 

.50 

1.00 

1.75 

10.25 

3.00 

2.25 

12.00 

11.68 

9.29 

11.00 

42.21 

10.42 

2.00 

2.50 

13.06 

4.20 

3.00 

4.00 

3.00 

3.25 

17.50 

3.00 

1.50 

4.45 

21.00 
19.50 
13.27 

28.91 
1.84 

15.00 
4.80 



S48,098.48 



A7nounts carried forward 



^37,077.89 



$48,098.48 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



Ill 



Amounts brought forward . 
W. A. Folsom & Co., stove 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 
A. E. Martell & Co., copy book 
W. A. Greenough & Co., directory 
S. J. Wood, keys 
Jackson, Caldwell & Co., furni 

ture . . 
Jordan, Marsh & Co., bedding 

F. H. Rolfe, flannel . 

Crosby Steam Gage & Valve Co. 

repairs 
Star Brass Mfg. Co., hangers 

D. W. McDermott, painting 
The Key Stone Mfg. Co., tools 
Merrimack Chemical Co., vitriol 
John L. Crafts, rope . 

A. W. Mitchell Mfg. Co., badge 
Scoville Mfg. Co., buttons . 
H. A. Winship, fire hats 
George W. Simmons & Co., regalia 

G. F. & S. E. Sturtevant, horses 
G. F. & S. E. Sturtevant, hay and 

grain 
Proctor Brothers, hay 

E. B. Vreeland, hay 
Fulton O'Brien, hay 
Mary Barnaby, hay 
Powers & Co., oats 
G. W. Ladd, oats 
J. Gushing & Co., oats 
M. G. Staples, teaming, etc 
H. J. Turner, teaming, etc 
J. Robinson, teaming, etc. 
Charles A. Mongan, use of horse 
A. M. Prescott, use of horse 

Amounts carried forward . 



$37,077.89 

32.85 

24.25 

3.00 

2.00 

3.55 

86.05 

19.22 

.50 

2.50 

5.10 

55.00 

7.50 

3.92 

11.50 

15.00 

30.37 

12.00 

29.25 

375.00 

815.21 

1,317.18 

24.43 

7.16 

7.85 

735.60 

87.06 

61.22 

47.00 

20.00 

3.25 

108.50 

144.00 

$41,174.91 



$48,098.48 



$48,098.48 



112 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 
Christopher Burke, use of horse 
James C. Fitzgerald, use of horse 
Benjamin H. Pond, use of horse 
John S. Nason, use of horse 
J. H. Thompson, carriage hire 
L. H. Brown, carriage hire 
Howard Lowell, carriage hire 

A. A. Sanborn, steam heating 
Walter Bates & Son, concreting 
N. C. Barker, carpentering 
Harry Hunt, brass work 

S. W. Fuller, lumber . 

R. M. Johnson, removing soil 

B. F. Wild & Co., fuel 
Horatio Welhngton & Co., fuel 
Charles R. Simpson, veterinary 

services .... 
S. H. Libby, premium of insur 

ance 
Smith & Robertson, premium of 

insurance . . . . 

Chas. S. Robertson, premium of 

insurance . . . 
H. W. Smith & Co., repairs of 

clocks .... 
New England Telephone & Tele 

graph Co., rentals and tolls 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas . 
Charlestown Gas & Electric Co., 

gas 

City of Boston, water for hydrants 
City of Boston, water for stations 
Mrs. Calvert, washing 
Mrs. Walter Loveland, washing . 
Samuel H. Stevens, washing 



$41,174.91 

48.00 

11.00 

7.00 

7.00 

5.00 

29.00 

21.00 

575.00 

68.00 

2.64 

4.75 

8.72 

4.00 

270.45 

770.08 

86.25 

37.50 

42.50 

367.50 

4.00 

90.35 
573.59 

108.88 
3,220.00 

139.00 
89.64 
29.74 
42.23 



$48,098.48 



Amounts carried foi'ward 



$47,837.73 



$48,098.48 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



113 



Amounts brought for^uard . 
E. W. Ring, washing ,. 
I. C. Jackson, washing 
H. D. & W. S. Durgin, ice . 
Winter Hill Ice Co., ice 
Boston Ice Co., ice 
Charles E. Farnham, expressing 
E. R. Perham, expressing . 
Oilman's Express, expressing 
Bancroft's Express, expressing 
Glines & Co., expressing . 
Curtis & Co., expressing 
George T. Day, expressing 
Cole's Express, expressing . 
A. G. Renner, expressing . 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 



$47,837.73 

39.85 

24.37 

48.00 

20.00 

12.00 

53.90 

2.10 

4.85 

.60 

.60 

.50 

6.09 

.25 

.30 

47.34 



S48,098.48 



$48,098.48 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, CENTRAL FIRE STATION^ 
BRASTOW SCHOOL LOT. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount appropriated by borrowing 
on Funded Debt account .... 

Debit. 

Cash, paid George M. Starbird, on 

acccount of contract 
A. H.Gould, services as architect 
Charles L. Underhill, iron work . 
C. Caseau, painting and gilding . 
Highways account, constructing 

driveway .... 

Water Service account, service 

pipe 



Balance to credit in account 
1895 



$20,000.00 

921.87 

11.30 

39.78 

1,222.48 

91.00 
22,286.43 

o,/ lo.o i 



$26,000.00 



$26,000.00 



114 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, CENTRAL FIRE STATION, 

ELECTRICAL APPARATUS AND FURNITURE. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount appropriated by borrowing 

on Funded Debt account .... $5,250.00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid George W. Bent & Co., 

furniture .... $ 49.00 

Fuller, Dana & Co., wire . . 173.80 

Blake Bell Co., bell . . . 536.51 
Derby, Kilmer & Pond Desk Co., 

book cases . . . '. 210.00 

Welch & Hall, horse . . . 90.00 

Eastern Electric Cable Co., cable 97.50 
N. E. Garaewell Co., jars, copper 

and zinc .... 204.15 
Combination Ladder Co., landing 

pads 50.00 

E. Spalding, blanket ... 7.85 

Frank L. Draper, labor on wires . 175.50 
Frank A. Blackburn, labor on 

wires 24.00 

James L. Prentiss, labor on wires 237.51 

Daniel McKennan, labor on wires 33.75 

James Bennett, labor on wires . 46.25 

Harry Clifford, labor on wires . 136.75 
Charles H. Bridges, labor on 

wires ..... 33.75 

$2,106.32 



Balance to credit in account 

1895 3,143.68 



$5,250.00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 115 

FIRE DEPARTMENT, CHEMICAL ENGINE AND 
EQUIPMENT. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount appropriated by borrowing 

on Funded Debt account .... 83,000.00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid S. F. Hayward & Co., 

chemical engine and hose . 81,848.80 

James R. Hopkins, freight . . 56.20 

G. F. & S. E. Sturtevant, horses . 325.00 

Charles E. Berry, harnesses . 86.00 

E. Spalding, harnesses . . 67.25 

F. C. Fuller & Son, hardware . 1.37 
Elijah Walker, carpentering . 45.06 
J. Caley & Co., engraving plate . 36.00 
Water Service account, service 

pipe ..... 32.85 



82,498.53 



Balance to credit in account 

1895 501.47 



83,000.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, HOOK AND LADDER STATION, 
HIGHLAND AVENUE. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount appropriated 
by borrowing on Funded Debt 
account 810,000.00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid George M. Starbird, on 

account of contract and extras 88,188.45 



Amounts carried forward . . 88,188.45 810,000.00 



116 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Aviounts brought forward . . $8,188.45 S10,000.00 

Loring & Phipps, services as 

architects .... 477.00 

Thos. Allen, concreting . . 156.50 

Christopher Burke, grading . 55.68 

Whitney & Snow, hardware . 18.88 

James F. Davlin, gas-fitting . 72.00 

Boston Electric Co., wiring . 77.60 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 

pipe, etc. ' . . . . 12.99 

Peter Forg, brass work . . . 1.75 

Charles E. Berry, harnesses . 63.00 
Water Service account, service 

pipe 26.90 

Highways account, driveway . 61.58 

City of Somerville, taxes of 1893 20.15 



$9,232.48 



Balance to credit in account 

1895 767.52 



810,000.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, HOOK AND LADDER STATION, 
HIGHLAND AVENUE, EQUIPMENT AND 
FURNITURE. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount appropriated 
by borrowing on Funded Debt 
account ........ $3,750.00 

Debit. 
Cash, paid Combination Ladder Co., 

ladder truck .... $2,217.75 
G. F. & S. E. Sturtevant, horses . 400.00 



Amounts carried fortvard . . $2,617.75 $3,750.00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 117 

Amounts brought forward . . $2,617.75 8-3,750.00 

E. Spalding, harnesses . . 99.30 

Boston Woven Hose and Rubber 

Co., collars .... 75.00 

N. E. Gamewell Co., indicator 

and gong .... 175.00 

Spofford & Kent, hose washing 

machine .... 60.00 

Fitchburg Railroad, freight . . 32.25 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Manufac- 
turing Co., mat . . . 4.50 

Jackson Caldwell & Co., rugs . 3.70 

Jackson Caldwell & Co., furniture 154.00 

A. B. Franklin, heating apparatus 497.50 



S3,710.00 
Balance to credit in account 1895 31 .00 



83,750.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, LAND FOR FIRE STATION, WARD 
ONE. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount appropriated by borrowing on 

Funded Debt account 86,000.00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid Frank Jones and George H. Goodwin, 
Trustees, lot land cor. Broadway and Franklin 
streets " 86,000.00 



118 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

FUNDED DEBT. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1893 $1,279,500.00 

Cash, received from sale of City Loan 

Bonds, No. 1,582 to 1,914 . . $152,000.00 
City Loan Sewer Bonds, Nos. 54 

to 73 20,000.00 172,000.00 



Debit. 

Cash, paid sundry persons : 

City Loan Bonds, Nos. 1,234 to 

1,243 10,000.00 

City Loan Bonds, Nos. 887 to 909 23,000.00 

City Loan Bonds, Nos. 934 to 938 5,000.00 

City Loan Bonds, Nos. 1,033 to 

1,042 10,000.00 

City Loan Bonds, Nos. 1,115 to 

1,118 4,000.00 

City Loan Bonds, Nos. 1,161 to 

1,167 7,000.00 

City Loan Bonds, Nos. 1,325 to 

1348 24,000.00 

City Loan Sewer Bond No. 36 . 1,000.00 

City Loan Paving Bonds Nos. 6 

to 10 5,000.00 

Water Loan Bond No. 283 . . 1,000.00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 100 to 

111 12,000.00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 315 to 

317 3,000.00 

Water Loan Bonds Nos. 399 to 

400 2,000.00 



$ 107,000.00 
Balance to debit in account 1895 1,344,500.00 



$1,451,500.00 



$1,451,500.00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



119 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received of W. P. Mitchell, per- 
mits to keep swine and goats, 
and collect grease . 
Martin Gill, rent of land 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

contagious cases 
Sundry Persons, money not called 
for 

Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to debit of account 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Caleb A. Page, salary as 

inspector 
Disbursements . 
Martin Gill, collecting offal . 
Martin Gill, use of sleds 
H.M. Prescott, collecting offal 
M. G. Staples, collecting offal 
Wm. J. McCarthy, collecting 

ashes .... 
H. S. Pond, rent of land 
New England Vaccine Co., virus 
George H. Cowdin, peppermint 
West & Jenney, sulphur 
Howard Hamblin, sulphur . 
G. W. Bryant, M. D., professional 

services .... 
Henry F. Curtis, M. D., profes 

sional services 

Am lent s carried forward . 



. 


812,000.00 


8200.00 




200.00 




62.69 




12.50 


475.19 


. 


0,442.54 




817,917.73 



81,200.00 

35.00 

6,850.00 

50.00 

5.00 

9.00 

5,700.00 

200.00 

273.26 

42.87 

4.34 

9.38 

155.00 

165.00 



814,698.85 



817,917.73 



120 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts b?'oitght for7uard . 

G. E. Hetherington, M. D., pro 

fessional services 
G. W. W. Whiting, M. D., profes 

sional services . . 
Directory for nurses, furnishing 

nurse . . . . . 

Wm. H. Ditchfield, services as 

nurse .... 
Mary Scarlett, services as nurse 
Josephine David, services as nurse 
C. A. Southwick, fumigating 
A. F. Carpenter, groceries 
A. L. Proctor, provisions 
V. Bradford, fish 
Lizzie McEachen, services as cook 
J. H. Brooks, dry goods 
E. B. Bradshaw, dry goods 
Jacob Brodie Co., dry good 
A- H. Hopkins, furniture 
L. H. Brown, carriage hire 
Patrick Kirk, compensation for 

damages 
John A. Dadman, police duty 
Michael F. Daley, police duty 
Howe & Flint, stove . 
Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel 
Citizen Publishing Co., advertising 
Somerville Journal Co., advertising 
Henry W. Pitman, printing . 
Heliotype Printing Co., maps 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 
William F. Waller, labor 
Charles W. Prescott, labor . 
John P. Marchant, labor 
Seward Dodge, repairs of wagons 



d4,698.85 

155.00 

155.00 

2.00 

205.00 
165.75 

74.28 

37.50 

101.06 

37.91 

4.58 
50.00 
31.60 
23.13 

3.19 
63.15 

6.00 

325.00 
82.50 
82.50 
10.70 
25.65 
18.01 
45.37 
16.00 
34.00 
10.50 
68.25 
34.00 
2.73 
50.15 



;17,917.73 



Amounts carried foj'ward 



$16,619.36 



117,917.73 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



121 



Amounts brought forward . 

I. B. Walker, repairs of wagons . 

L. A. Wright, repairs of wagons . 

J. W. Coveney, rent of Post-ofifice 
box . . . . . 

A. T. Nickerson, car fares . 

Charles E. Farnham, expressing . 

Jackson Caldwell & Co., storage . 

J. E. Herrick, building pest house 

I. B. Kendal], premium of in- 
surance ..... 

Sundry Persons, burying animals . 

Highways account, tool house 



16,619.36 


817,917.73 


33.30 




1.50 




4.00 




2.00 




.35 




125.00 




837.97 




30.00 




139.25 




125.00 






SI 7 01 7 7Q 



HIGHWAYS. 

Credit 

Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received of Charles S. Philbrick 
sidewalk 
Lydia F. Hale, sidewalk 
George B. Howard, sidewalk 
W. F. Mansfield, sidewalk . 
E. W. Lundahl, sidewalk 
Michael Martell, sidewalk . 
George G. Fox, sidewalk 
David Rosenfeld, sidewalk . 
Ellen A. Murphy, sidewalk . 
Esther O. W^hite, sidewalk . 
Isabella T. Silver, sidewalk . 
Olive H. Durrell, sidewalk . 
Edward Keating, sidewalk . 
John L. Greenough, sidewalk 
North Packing & Provision Co. 
sidewalk 



S 23.50 
13.20 
51.35 

106.93 
44.34 
15.02 

456.26 
83.44 
13.65 

119.04 
20.20 
24.58 
28.19 
17.29 

200.46 



860,000.00 



Amoujiis carried foriuard . 



81,217.45 



860,000.00 



122 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts drought foricia?'d . 
Antonio Preiva, sidewalk 
Lavinia P. Fuller, sidewalk . 
Luiz de Sourabettencurtt, side 

walk .... 
Alexander Munroe, sidewalk 
Mary Dorney, sidewalk 
John A. Wessells, sidewalk . 
Joseph K. James, sidewalk . 
Nathan E. Fitz, sidewalk 
William Mullen, sidewalk 
Warren P. Wilder, sidewalk 
George W. Bean, sidewalk . 
Edmund S. Sparrow, sidewalk 
W. C. Trowbridge, sidewalk 
W. G. Webber, sidewalk 
F. M. Lyons, sidewalk 
N. E. Dressed Meat & Wool Co. 

sidewalk 
F. H. Wilkins, sidewalk 
Charles Drouet, sidewalk . 
James Connors, sidewalk 
Anthony Haderbolets, sidewalk 
Frank L. Blood, sidewalk . 
Joseph O. Hobbs, sidewalk 
Frank A. Loomis, sidewalk 
Harriet E. Snow, sidewalk . 
Somerville Journal Co., sidewalk 
Martha M. Sturtevant, sidewalk 
Christopher C. McGrath, side- 
walk .... 
Barnabus Binney, sidewalk . 
Mary Langmaid, sidewalk . 
Heirs Samuel P. Langmaid, side 

walk .... 
F. M. Kilmer, bricks . 



$1,217.45 
7.74 

61.02 

15.02 
64.00 
24.12 

81.50 
118.92 
51.20 
34.31 
48.00 
20.27 
111.70 
23.80 
87.94 
60.20 

282.24 
99.32 
9.10 
30.80 
42.90 
61.32 
63.00 
53.19 
16.76 
55.04 
95.51 

168.44 
17.47 

128.00 

185.77 
12.80 



§60,000.00 



Amounts ca7'ried foi'iuai'd 



$3,348.85 



$60,000.00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



123 



Amounts brought fo?'ward 
J. S. Ham, bricks 
Charles F. Brine, bricks 
John H. Brine, bricks 
David L. McGregor, bricks 
William Veazie, bricks 
John Stackpole, bricks 
Wilbur P. Rice, bricks 
G. F. Hobson, driveway 
John M. Woods, driveway 
Charles L. Wilder, driveway 
W. O. Francis, driveway 
John Sweeney, driveway 
Maurice Fitzgerald, driveway 
Fred. L. Pulsifer, driveway 
Edward J. Llewellyn, driveway 
D. B. Mulcahey, driveway . 
Charles O. Lailor, driveway 
George W. Clark, driveway 
Edward Cox, driveway 
Harmon S. Trueman, driveway 
George B. Pitcher, driveway 
Andrew Thompson, driveway 
Charles Lynam, driveway 
W. A. Crosby, driveway 
Eugene Selg, driveway 
Margaret H. Brown, driveway 
Addie A. Snow, driveway 
Catherine J. Sherry, driveway 
Boston & Maine Railroad, labor 

and materials 
Somerville Electric Light Co. 

labor and materials 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., labor 

and materials 
George E. & Eugene H. Lane 

paving blocks 

Amoutits carried forward . 



83,348.85 

19.20 

20.26 

20.27 

24.00 

84.00 

47.12 

104.00 

2.25 

4.25 

19.10 

4.25 

10.90 

11.50 

9.15 

11.90 

16.00 

4.50 

6.25 

32.25 

11.03 

6.50 

4.25 

5.00 

8.75 

6.00 

6.50 

2.50 

6,'2d 

481.65 

12.80 

19.75 

15.00 
64,385.98 



860,000.00 



860,000.00 



124 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought fo7'wa7'd . 

Frank Gould, filling . 

Frank L. Grant, horse 

Asa Durgin, old boiler 

Irving L. Russell, manure . 

Patrick Kelley, manure 

Thomas Ormand, rent 

Arthur Murley, rent . 

Fire Department, Central Fire 
Station, driveway 

Fire Department, Hook and Lad- 
der Station, driveway 

Health Department, tool house . 

Sidew-alks account, labor and 
materials .... 

Nathan Tufts Park account, 
edgestones .... 

Water Works Extension, paving 
blocks ..... 

Sundry persons, money not paid . 



Debit. 

Cash,*"paid laborers' pay rolls 

Thomas H. Fames, salary as 

Superintendent . . ■ . 
Thomas H. Fames, board of 

horses . . . . . 

Frank Buttimer, teaming 
Maurice Buttimer, teaming 
Thomas Allen, teaming 
John Cronin, teaming 
T. F. Crimmings, teaming . 
John Elkins, teaming 
James Fannon, teaming 
Martin Gill, teaming . 

Amounts carried forward . 



$4,385.98 
116.25 
40.00 
25.00 
57.00 
50.00 
72.00 
64.00 

1,222.48 



$60,000.00 



61.58 




125.00 




1,897.74 




597.59 




62.40 




12.75 


8,789.77 




$68,789.77 


$36,913.72 




1,600.00 




417.17 




218.89 




55.00 




42.00 




18.00 




115.00 




110.00 




212.47 




137.50 




$39,839.75 


$68,789.77 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



125 



Amounts brought forward . 
Edward Grant, teaming 
Henry Gray, teaming 
James Hoar, Sr., teaming . 
John McLaughlin, teaming 
Wm. J. McCarthy , blockstones, etc 
Wm. J. McCarthy, edgestones, etc 
George F. McKenna, teaming 
A. M. Prescott, teaming 
John Silk, teaming 
Frank Grant, teaming 
Wm. J. McLaughlin, teaming 
Charles Booth, teaming 
Christopher Burke, teaming and 

stone .... 
Dennis Shea, round stone . 
Thomas Kennedy, stone 
Charles J. Simpson, stone . 
L. G. Carr, stone 
Clarence Russell, stone 
C. T. Shean, stone 
Charles B. Russell, stone . 
Dennis Ryan, stone 
Frank P. Ladd, stone 
Thomas Allen, stone . 
A. L. Farrar, stone 
Howard I. Lowell, stone 
N. M. Cofran & Co., bricks 
W. A. Sanborn, bricks 
Wm. R. Maxwell, bricks 
M. W. Carr & Co., sand 
J. Fitzpatrick, sand 
Michael J. Fitzpatrick, sand 
Fred C. Ayer, Agt., lumber 
Wilbur P. Rice, lumber 
Alley & Jaques, lumber 

Amounts car7'ied forward . 
(9) 



S39,839.75 

16.00 

83.23 

26.00 

21.00 

1,550.73 

1,576.55 

352.00 

34.00 

54.50 

232.80 

57.50 

50.00 

2,094.73 

2,470.40 

298.80 

127.68 

28.50 

35.76 

114.07 

6.67 

194.71 

241.71 

70.37 

69.18 

1.05 

545.30 

1,650,82 

92.80 

746.50 

33.43 

15.00 

100.27 

104.90 

143.04 

853,079.75 



868,789. 



i i 



868,789.' 



126 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . . $53,079.75 $68,789.77 

Alley & Littlefield, lumber . . 9.35 

I. H. Brown & Co., lumber . 150.00 
J. E. Herrick, repairs of bridge, 

etc 238.34 

Highland Coal Co., cement . 7.25 

Abbott, Downing & Co., brooms . 36.50 
The Ingersoll-Sargeant Drill Co., 

drills 35.25 

Walworth Mfg. Co., pipe . . 48.96 

Boston Belting Co., belt . . 95.33 
H. W. Johns Mfg. Co., covering 

boiler 15.00 

Braman, Dow & Co., steam pipe . 86.78 
Wm. Campbell & Co., repairs of 

crusher ..... 66.33 
Star Brass Mfg. Co., repairs of 

crusher . . . . . 63.94 
Holmes & Blanchard, repairs of 

crusher ..... 44.79 

Miller & Shaw, repairs of roller . 667.92 
David W. Crocker, repairs of 

carts, etc 179.80 

F. H. Flag, repairs of carts, etc. . 23.50 

J. Miller, repairs of carts, etc. . 17.45 

I. B. Walker, repairs of carts, etc. 132.65 

A. Clement, horseshoeing . . 198.83 

Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing . 231.89 

Seward Dodge, horseshoeing, etc* 632.66 

E. E. Olney & Co., horseshoeing 12.13 
John Kellogg, horseshoeing . 1,50 
George McDormand, horseshoe- 
ing ..... 2.75 

F. Dooris, blacksmithing . . 230.30 
Charles W. Ingalls, blacksmithing 1.50 
D. J. Bennett, harness work . 451.15 



Amounts carried foi'ward . . $56,761.60 $68,789.77 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



12' 



Amounts brought forward . 

E. Spalding, harness work . 
VV. H. Buskin & Son, harness 

work .... 

F. H. McCoubry, harness work 
Ames Plow Co., cart and tools 
Perrin, Seamans & Co., tools 
Dodge, Haley & Co., tools . 

L. A. Wright, tools 
Charles L. Underhill, tools 
M. Dix, oil ... 

Silver Light Oil Co., oil 
Harrington & Bradbury, oil 
Underhay Oil Co., oil 
Priest, Page & Co., scales . 
Roberts Iron Works Co., boiler 
S. T. Manson, roller . 
J. W. Johnson, iron tank 
Wm. R. Fleming & Co., freight 

repairs, etc. 
Nightingale & Childs, screens 
Frank E. Fitts Mfg. & Supply 

Co., screens . 
George Tyler & Co., moulboard 
Harrisburg Foundry & Machine 

Works, fire door 
Pigeon Hill Granite Co., stone 

bounds .... 
Sweatt & Gould, stone bounds 
Welch & Hall, horses 

G. F. & F. E. Sturtevant, horses 
G. W. Ladd, hay and grain 
R. W. Willey & Co., hay and grain 
Proctor Brothers, hay and grain 
George H. Sampson, powder 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 



856,761.60 
62.00 

25.00 

23.50 

236.81 

132.27 

5.91 

16.95 

4.70 

6.25 

73.28 

29.12 

7.00 

277.50 

875.00 

7.50 

10.35 

376.50 
275.28 

7.25 

30.00 

2.50 

30.00 
9.00 
535.00 
400.00 
3,152.74 
904.03 
597.79 
120.92 
130.75 



868,789.77 



Amounts carried forward . 



865,126.50 



868,789.77 



128 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Avioimts bi'OJight forwai'd . 
Citizen Publishing Co., printing . 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
W. I. Heald, hardware 
W. E. Plummer & Co., hardware 
F. C. Fuller & Co., hardware 
L. C. Chipraan, painting 
J. E. Parsons, zinc 
W. L. Snow, plumbing 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 
J. P. Clisby, painting signs 
Edwin A. Church, street signs 
Charles E. Stearns & Son, street 

signs .... 
William Vogler, rent of roadway 
N. E. Fitz & Co., wharfage 
Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel 
Baker-Hunnewell Co., fuel 
Thomas Walsh, cutting paving 
blocks . . . . . 

City of Medford, one-half cost of 
maintaining Middlesex bridge 
Thomas Hollis, drugs 
W. H. Way, veterinary services 
David T. Bolger, veterinary ser 

vices 
L. H. Brown, carriage hire 
Charles B. Stevens, Register, re- 
cording . 
City of Boston, water 
New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., tolls, etc. 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection 
& Insurance Co., premium of 
insurance . . . . 



$65,126.50 

97.75 

66.00 

166.73 

119.10 

31.50 

1.51 

10.00 

.75 

18.29 

57.77 

7.50 

23.85 

4.50 
135.00 
154.50 
508.85 
229.71 

244.23 

425.99 

4.25 

104.65 

10.00 
2.50 

23.39 
74.60 

74.87 



150.00 



$68,789.7' 



Amounts carried forward 



$67,874.29 



$68,789.77 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 129 

Avioimts brought forivard . . 867,874.29 $68,789.77 

Charles S. Robertson, premium 

of insurance .... 155.00 

William A. Muzzey, premium of 

insurance .... 155.00 

F. W. Bickford, filing saws . . 28.50 

S. J. Wood, filing saws . . 1.60 

Charles E. Farnham, expressing . 2.20 

E. R. Perham, expressing . . .75 

Oilman's Express, expressing . 23.50 

Water Services account, service 

pipe, etc. .... 34.95 

Sewers Construction account, 

catch basin stones . . . 6.91 

City of Somerville, sewer assess- 
ments ..... 15.88 



868,298.58 



Excess and Deficiency, balance 

to credit of account . . 491.19 



868,789.77 



HIGHWAYS, CITY STABLE. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount appropriated 
by borrowing on Funded Debt 
account §14,500.00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid Lord Brothers on account 

of contract .... $9,000.00 
A. H. Gould, services as archi- 
tect 560.35 

Crimminixs & Collins, sewer . 468.16 



Amounts canned forward . . $10,028.51 $14,500.00 



130 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . . $10,028.51 $14,500.00 
Highland Coal Co., cement . 3.75 
George D. Goodrich, drain pipe 5.57 
W. A. Snow & Co., vane . . 65.00 
Water Service Assessment ac- 
count, service pipe . . 15.00 
Sewers, Construction, sewer, etc. 234.05 



$10,351.88 
Balance to credit in account 1895 4,148.12 



$14,500.00 



HIGHWAYS, PAVING WASHINGTON STREET, UNION 
SQUARE TO MEDFORD STREET. 

Credit. 
Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of account . $406.91 

Debit. 

Cash, paid Wm. H. Gore, final payment on account 

of contract $406.91 



INDIGENT SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $500.00 

State of Massachusetts, Indigent Soldiers and Sailors 296.00 



$796.00 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Sundry Persons . . . $592.00 

Excess and Deficiency, balance to 

credit of account . . . 204.00 



S796.00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 131 

INTEREST. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $65,000.00 

Cash, received of R. L. Day & Co., 

premium and interest on bonds 84,589.84 
Sundry Persons, on taxes and 

assessments .... 8,686.10 

Interest on deposits in banks . 1,492.33 

Real Estate Liens, interest on taxes 

on property sold to the city . 7.95 14,776.22 



Dehit. 

Cash, paid on Funded Debt : 

$436,000, one year at 4 per 

cent 817,440.00 

$149,000, six months at 4 per 

cent 2,980.00 

$275,000, one year at 4J per 

cent 12,375.00 

$200,000, one year at 5 per 

cent 10,000.00 



842,795.00 
Less coupons unpaid . . . 1,380.00 



$41,415.00 
Sundry Persons, unpaid coupons . 1,380.00 



842,795.00 



On Temporary Loans : 

Henry E. Wright, on note of 
81,000, four months at 6 per 

cent 820.00 

Mary Langmaid, on note of 
84,000, six months at 6 per 
cent 120.00 



$79,776.22 



Amounts carried forzuard . . 8140.00 879,776.22 



132 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . 

Trustees of estate of William C. 

High, on note of $1,600, six 

months at 6 per cent. 

E. Isolia Norwood^ on note of 

$2,000, six months at 6 per cent. 

George H. Hull, on note of 

$1,000, six months at 6 per cent. 

G. T. Burnham, Trustee, on note 

of $1,500, six months at 6 per 

cent. ..... 

Blake Brothers & Co., on note 
of: 

$1,000, one year at 6 percent. 

1,000, ' 

5,000, ' 

1,000, ' 

1,000, ' 

1,000, ' 

1,000, ' 

1,000, ' 

1,000, ' 

1,000, ' 

3,000, ' 

10,000, ' 

10,000, ' 

5,000, eight months at 6 per 

cent. .... 

10,000, six months, at 6 per- 
cent. .... 

2,500, six months at 6 per 
cent. .... 

1,000, six months at 6 per 

cent. 
4,000, six months at six per 
cent. . . . . 

Amounts carried forward . 



i( II a II 

a a ic a 

a ii (c (( 

a a a a 

a a n ii 

(I ii ii ii 

ii ii ii ii 

ii ii ii ii 

ii a ii ii 

ii a it ii 

ii ii ii ii 



$140.00 

48.00 
60.00 
30.00 

45.00 

60.00 

60.00 

300.00 

60.00 

60.00 

60.00 

60.00 

60.00 

60.00 

60.00 

180.00 

600.00 

600.00 

200.00 

300.00 

75.00 

30.00 

120.00 

$3,268.00 



$79,776.22 



$79,776.22 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT, 133 

Amounts brought forward . . 83,268.00 879,776.22 

Somerville Co-operative Bank, on 

note of 810,000, one year at 

per cent. . . . . 600.00 

Margaret Lawson, on note of 

$1,500, one year at 6 per 

cent 90.00 

F. S. ^Moseley & Co., on note of 

8100,000, eight months at 3 

per cent, and y\j per cent. 

commission .... 2,062.50 

Charles A. Skinner, on note of 

$1,000, eight months at 6 per 

cent 40.00 

Lavinia W. Smith, on note of 

8800, eight months at 6 per 

cent 32.00 

W. Irving Heald, on note of 

82,000, nine months at 6 per 

cent 90.00 

Brewster, Cobb & Estabrook, on 

note of 8100,000, discount at 

^T(r P^^ cent., 4 months . 687.50 

Trustees of estate of Mary Hutch- 
inson, on note 81,900, one year 

at 6 per cent. . . . 114.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., on note of 

810,000, six months at 6 per 

cent 300.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., on note of 

82,500, six months at 6 per 

cent 75.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., on note of 

81,000, six months at 6 per 

cent . 30.00 



Amounts carried forward . . 87,389.00 879,776.22 



134 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



AnioiLiiis brought forward . 

Blake Brothers & Co., on note of 
$4,000, six months at 6 per 
cent. . ... . . 

Brewster, Cobb '& Estabrook, on 
notes of $100,000, discount 
three months at 3 per cent. . 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
on note of $50,000, nine 
months at 3J per cent. . 

Brewster, Cobb & Estabrook, on 
notes of $200,000, four months, 
discounted at 2J per cent. 



$7,389.00 



120.00 



750.00 



1,218.75 



1,916.67 
$11,394.42 



$79,776.22 



On Funded Debt 
On Temporary Loans 



Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to credit of account 



$42,795.00 
11,394.42 

$54,189.42 



$25,586.80 



$79,776.22 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Credit. 



Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received of Sundry Persons 
costs on taxes and assessments 
Thomas Cunningham, milk in^ 

specter's fees . 
Thomas R. Roulstone, plumbers 

licenses .... 
Ammiel Colman, fees for sealing 
weights and measures 

Amounts car7'-ied foi'ward . 



12,876.78 

138.00 
91.50 
192.28 
$3,298.56 



$6,600.00 



Q^, 



$6,600.00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



135 



Amounts brought foriuard . 


83,298.56 


86,600.00 


Fulton O'Brion, public 


weigher's 






fees 


. 


14.55 




License to peddle 


. 


25.00 




New England Telephone & Tele- 






graph Co., rebate . 


. 


15.00 




George I. Vincent, city 


clerk : 






Recording mortgages 


8462.75 






Marriage certificates 


. 276.00 






Licensing dogs . 


. 270.00 






Amusements 


. 155.00 






Junk licenses 


. 66.00 






Auctioneers' licenses 


46.00 






Intelligence offices 


. 16.00 






Street musicians 


23.00 






Billiards, pool, etc. 


. 26.00 






Fireworks 


66.00 






Night lunch licenses 


4.00 






Slaughtering licenses 


2.00 






Naturalization fees 


1.00 






Copies of records 


. 22.75 







Transfer of dog license 



.25 



Real Estate Liens, costs on 
property deeded to the city 

Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to debit of account 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Frank A. Fuller & Co., 

carpentering . . . . 

Fuller & Matthews, carpentering 

Osgood & Stevens, carpentering . 

F. S. Aldrich, carpentering 



1,436.75 
8.35 



8248.24 

62.16 

53.95 

1.25 



4,798.21 
2,333.90 

813,732.11 



Amounts carried forward 



8365.60 



813.732.11 



136 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



A7nounts brought foriuaf'd . 
C. W. Cahalan, plumbing . 
James F. Davlin, plumbing 
G. A. Walker, painting 
J. Q. Twombly, glazing 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
Howe & Flint, hardware 
W. I. Heald, hardware 
J. A. Durell, hardware 
F. C. Fuller, hardware 
F. E. Whitney, repairs 
J. E. Herrick, labor . 
F. J. Stanley, horse keeping 
Cadogan Brothers, horseshoeing 
Lawrence Barrett, horseshoeing 
Seward Dodge, horseshoeing 
Charles L. Underbill, blacksmith 

ing .... 

E. Spalding, harnesswork . 
P. Manley, harnesswork 
H. A. Brownell, harnesswork 
Richard Tyner & Co., robe 
L. H. Brown, carriage hire 
J. H. Thompson, carriage hire 
Eugene Mead, carriage hire 
A. M. Prescott, teaming 
K. M. Sturtevant, teaming . 
Ernest W. Bailey, car fares 
Kate W. Wood, car fares . 
Frost & Adams, engineers' sup 

plies .... 
J. B. Dupont, engineers' supplie 
Buff & Btrger, repairs of transit 
W\ E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
Jacob Brodie Co., dry goods 
J. H. Brooks, dry goods 



$365.60 

5.40 

.50 

24.75 

5.50 

119.40 

17.92 

.44 

3.27 

.40 

.60 

20.30 

812.50 

22.00 

8.00 

5.00 

2.35 

12.75 

4.05 

1.60 

10.00 

173.50 

4.00 

49.50 

28.00 

13.32 

119.21 

28.10 

69.55 
1.30 

44.60 
2.12 

5.28 
3.55 



$13,732.11 



Amounts ca^'ried forward 



$1,984.36 



113,732.11 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT, 



13' 



Amounts brotcght forwai'd . . §1, 984. 36 
Irving W. Wheeler & Co., awn- 
ings ..... 4.50 
F. H. Whitcomb, cleaning carpets 12.40 

B. P. Palmer, door stops . . 2.75 
T. S. Buck, stamps . . . 8.25 
George B. Sargent & Son, stamps 4.86 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 32.70 
Somerville Journal Co., advertis- 
ing ..... 2.50 

Citizen Publishing Co., advertis- 
ing 8.00 

News Printing Co., advertising . 2.25 
William E. Murphey, reseating 

chairs ..... 3.75 

Philip J. Fitzpatrick, reseating 

chairs ..... .85 

John Canfield & Co., door checks 1.50 
A. T. Carpenter, soap . . 3.05 
F. F. Phipps, drugs . . . 2.85 
Jacob Woodbury, steel springs . .80 
S. J. Wood, keys . . . 19.35 
W. W. Winship, bags . . 7.50 
Tobias & Wall, bags ... 6.00 
Daniel Crocker, repairs of clocks 4.00 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., furni- 
ture 7.89 

Hatch & Farnham, repairs of 

table . . . . . 5.00 

C. M. Blake, newspapers . . 6.00 
Jairus Mann, watching . . 70.00 
M. A. Mann, laundering . . 24.00 
William S. Ward, supplies . . 9.63 
I. H. Brown & Co., lumber . 28.50 
Frye, Phipps & Co., drill . . 2.50 
John A. Keliey, teaming . . 63.75 



613,732.11 



Ajnounts carried foi^ward . 



82,329.49 



138 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amoitnts brougJitfoi^ward . . $2,329.49 

H. D. & W. S. Durgin, ice . . 35.00 

John McNamee Sons, granite 

curbing ..... 119.25 

W. A. Snow & Co., drinking foun- 
tain 185.00 

E. R. Morse Safe Co., safe . . 57.00 

The Fairbanks Co., weights, etc. 35.60 

Byron Boyd, abstracts . . 20.00 

E. A. Pinnock, typewriting . 7.20 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

ink 13.00 

J. A. McLane, posting . . 144.10 

S. H. Libby, services as auc- 
tioneer ..... 17.70 

Charles R. Stevens, Register, re- 
cording ..... 13.85 

State of California, certificate . 4.00 

J. W. Coveney, rent of Post-Office 

box 4.00 

Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas . 22.27 

Somerville Electric Light Co., 

lighting 345.20 

City of Boston, water . . 22.00 

Middlesex County Truant School, 

board of truants . . . 132.86 

City of Lowell, board of truants . 954.04 

New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rentals and tolls . 270.20 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., sup- 
plies 8.97 

Boston Belting Co., hose . . 11.90 

Horatio Welhngton & Co., fuel . 124.25 

B. F. Wild & Co., fuel . . 44.25 

Baker-Hunnewell Co., fuel . . 14.50 

Lynn Brass Band, concert . . 100.00 



113,732.11 



Amounts carried forwa7'd 



$5,035.63 



$13,732.11 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 139 

A7no2ints brought forward . 85,035.63 813,732.11 

Hasten & Wells Fire Works Mfg. 

Co., fireworks . . . 500.00 

Willard C. Kinsley Post, No. 139, 
G. A. R., contribution for ob- 
servance of Memorial Day . 350.00 

Company M, M. V. M., appropri- 
ation for rifle practice . . 200.00 

Ammiel Colman, salary as sealer 

of weights and measures . 100.00 

Disbursements .... 7.15 

Charles L. Ellis, salary as deputy 

collector .... 1,000.00 

Disbursements .... 5.00 

Gertrude G. Kendall, clerical ser- 
vices ..... 370.67 

Alice D. Keniston, clerical ser- 
vices ..... 174.67 

Laura E. McBain, clerical services 178.67 

Luella M. Eaton, clerical services 104.00 

Elizabeth Goldsmith, clerical ser- 
vices ..... 104.67 

Lucia A. Manning, clerical ser- 
vices 391.26 

Clara B. Snow, clerical services . 51.00 

Addie A. Snow, clerical services 44.00 

Florence M. Grow, clerical ser- 
vices ..... 54.67 

Clara Z. Elliot, clerical ser^'ices . 53.50 

Frederic W. Cook, clerical ser- 
vices ..... 6.00 

Charles G. Brett, clerical services 48.00 

Frank E. Merrill, clerical services 48.00 

Wm. P. Pitman, clerical services 39.00 

Charles S. Robertson, clerical 

services ..... 45.00 



Amotinis carried forward . . 88,910.89 813,732.11 



140 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forzuard 
Arthur D. Osborne, clerical 

services . 
George O. Shaw, clerical services 
Arthur Atwood, clerical services 
Wm. C. Hammond, clerical 

services . 
Precinct Officers 
E. P. Cook, labor 
N. L. Pennock, labor 
W. H. Kelley, labor 
VV. H. Laskey, labor 
John Battles, labor 
William Denton, labor 
George H. Goss, labor 
John O'Brien, labor . 
Patrick O'Connell, labor 

E. T. Peterson, labor . 
Daniel H. Rinn, labor 
B. F. Sheridan, labor . 
Alfred Shiner, labor . 
James G. Wright, labor 
James L. Whitaker, labor 
Margaret Hartness, labor 
Chas. S. Eaton, refreshments 
Henry J. Seller, refreshments 
J.Tyler Hicks & Co., refreshments 

F. E. Cheney & Co., refreshments 
Charles Rickenburg, refreshments 
Odd Fellows Building Association, 

rent . . . . . 

F. A. White, rent 
Philip Eberle, rent 
Albert B. Fales, commission as 

Justice . . . . . 

Wm. P. Mitchell, commission as 

Justice ..... 



;8,910.89 

12.50 
86.00 
86.00 

70.00 

1,600.00 

18.00 

11.00 

11.00 

2.00 

5.00 

10.00 

5.00 

7.00 

7.00 

5.00 

5.00 

7.00 

2.00 

5.00 

9.00 

5.00 

15.50 

36.00 

20.00 

8.55 

6.75 

15.00 
45.00 
25.00 

7.00 

7.00 



$13,732.11 



A in ounts ca fried fo rwa rd 



$11,065.19 



$13,732.11 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



141 



Ai7iounts brought forward . 

T. F. Farrington, street numbering 

C. A. Southwick, census of births, 

etc. .... 

John M. Schroeder, census o 

births, etc. 
Fish, Richardson & Storrow, legal 

services .... 
George E. Elliot, turkeys . 
J. L. Glover, turkeys . 
S. S.Higgins, turkeys . 
Bancroft's Express, expressing 
A. G. Renner, expressing . 
C. E. Farnham, expressing . 
M. G. Staples, expressing . 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 
E. R. Perham, expressing . 
GUnes & Co., expressing 
R. A. R. Benson, expressing 
Wm. Buckley, veterinary services 
Albert C. Aldrich, return of births 
Wm. H. Bailey, return of births . 
G. W. Bryant, return of births . 
W. A. Bell, return of births 
Henry F. Curtis, return of births 
George A. Coburn, return of 

births . . . . . 

Mary B. Currier, return of births 
E. H. Codding, return of births . 
Charles S. Cahill, return of births 
John B. Curtis, return of births . 
A. H. Carvill, return of births 
A. B. Dearborn, return of births . 
T. M. Durell, return of births 
A. Ward Follett, return of births 
P. J. Finnegan, return of births . 

Amounts carried forward . 
(10) 



811,065.19 
34.75 

192.76 

127.80 

60.24 

72.96 

212.24 

41.12 

.15 

.30 

10.60 

6.75 

2.10 

14.85 

.25 

1.00 

2.00 

6.00 

3.25 

4.25 

9.75 

2.50 

1.25 

.75 

2.25 

7.25 

5.75 

4.00 

7.25 

18.25 

14.25 

3.00 

811,934.81 



813,732.11 



813,732.11 



142 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



A ui u n ts b ro ugh t fo rwa rd . 

A. Waldo Furbush, return of 

births .... 
A. A. Gibson, return of births 
J. B. Gould, return of births 
John A. Gregg, return of births 
H. A. Hands, return of births 
Wm. J. Hatchett, return of births 
H. A. Houghton, return of births 
R. L. Lane, return of births 
A. Moll, return of births 
H. B. Mclntire, return of births . 
George A. Miles, return of births 
J. A. McDonald, return of births 
H. P. MaKechnie, return of births 
Charles E. Mongan, return of 

births ..... 
Albert L. Norris, return of births 
Emma J. Peasley, return of births 
E. A. Sanborn, return of births 

E. H. Stevens, return of births 

F. W. Taylor, return of births 
Anna B. Taylor, return of births 
George W. W. Whiting, return of 

births .... 
Charles C. Ellis, return of births 
Horace C. White, return of births 
R. WiUis, return of births . 
John F. Couch, return of births 
Frederick L. Kellogg, return of 

births .... 
A. E. Merrill, return of births 
Frank L. Newton, return of births 
John W. Coveney, return of deaths 
W. A. Frink, return of deaths 
W. A. Flaherty, return of deaths . 



$11,934.81 

1.75 
11.00 
3.25 
12.25 
5.50 
2.00 
1.25 
6.50 
1.25 
1.00 
1.25 
1.00 
2.50 

.50 
.75 
1.00 
1.25 
3.75 
3.75 
2.25 

3.25 

4.50 

7.75 

3.00 

41.00 

.50 
2.00 
3.75 
7.50 
4.75 
41.00 



$13,732.11 



Amounfs ca7'i'ied forward 



$12,117.56 



$13,732.11 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 143 

Amounts brought forward . . $12,117.56 813,732.11 

E. H. Marsh, return of deaths . 23.75 

Alfred E. Mann, return of deaths 25.50 

P. H. Rafferty, return of deaths . 26.25 
Francis M. Wilson, return of 

deaths 5.00 

John Bryant, return of deaths . 13.00 

C. H. Lockhart, return of deaths 12.75 

Fred S. Young, ringing bell . . 7.00 

J. H. Colbath, ringing bell . . 9.00 

A. B. Colesworthy, ringing bell . 9.00 

A. Strahan, ringing bell . . 6.00 

G. W. Littlefield, ringing bell . 6.00 

Herbert E. Stone, ringing bell . 6.00 

Thomas Nightingale, ringing bell 6.00 
E. C. Sholes, compensation for 

damages .... 200.00 
Abbott VV. Lewis, compensation 

for damages .... 500.00 
Emulous A. Aldrich, compen- 
sation for damages . . . 275.00 
Margaret Reardon, compensation 

for damages .... 225.00 
Rosanna H. Bevens, compensation 

for damages .... 173.00 
Susan O. O'Brien, compensation 

for damages .... 50.00 
Charles H. Flagg, compensation 

for damages .... 31.55 
Samuel B. Fay, compensation for 

damages .... 4.75 

$13,732.11 



144 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



NATHAN TUFTS PARK. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount appropriated by borrowing 
on Funded Debt account .... 
Overlay and Abatement, amount transferred 
Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of account . 



$15,000.00 

385.17 

2,264.11 



$17,649.28 



Debit 
Cash, paid laborers . 

Henry Gray, teaming . 
George F. McKenna, teaming 
Richard Falvey, teaming 
T. F. Cummings, teaming . 
A. M. Prescott, teaming 
Christopher Burke, teaming 
Dennis C. Collins, teaming . 
Frank Grant, teaming . 
George W. Prichard, teaming 
John Silk, teaming 
Owen Cunningham, teaming 
Massachusetts Broken Stone Co. 

stone .... 
Quincy Paving & Edgestone Co. 

paving blocks . 
Wm. H. Gore, paving 
Rockport Granite Co., stone step: 
Fiske Wharf and Warehouse Co. 

wharfage 
W^hitney & Snow, tools 
F. Dooris, sharpening tools 
Ho\ve & Flint, dipper 
J. F. Burton, painting . 
T. F. Farrington, carpentering 

Amounts carried fo7'ward . 



1,422.36 

80.00 

236.25 

57.50 

39.52 

591.75 

290.23 

110.00 

60.75 

25.00 

10.00 

5.00 

408.97 



893.18 


444.03 


315.00 


4.00 


186.11 


149.91 


.12 


4.50 


6.00 


$13,340.18 



$17,649.28 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT 



145 



Amounts brought forward 
F. C. Ayer, Agent, lumber 
I. H. Brown & Co., lumber 
J. E. Herrick, lumber 
Alley & Jaques, lumber 
Walworth Mfg. Co., pipe 
City of Cambridge, use of roller 
City of Chelsea, use of roller 
E. R. Cheney, use of derrick 
A. McLeod, moving building 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., coke 
Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel 
Arthur J. Wellington, crushing 

stone .... 
James H. Bowditch, plants, etc 
Joseph Breck & Sons, grass 

seed .... 
W. I. Heald, grass seed 
Charles J. Simpson, sand 
George A. Blaney, et aL, loam 
Peter Leroux, manure 
Franklin Henderson, manure 
Chetham Parks, manure 
Colman Brothers, poles 
John A. Ray, police duty . 
Charles E. Farnham, expressing 
Horace L. Eaton, car fares 
City of Somerville, taxes assessed 

to Tufts, et al. 
Sewer Assessments account 

sewers .... 
Highways account, edgestones 



813,340.18 817,649.28 


33.91 


5.00 


1.86 


3.07 


16.17 


30.00 


401.45 


55.80 


20.00 

• 


4.75 


32.80 


571.50 


920.20 


167.95 


2.83 


21.00 


7.35 • 


18.63 


13.30 


4.00 


10.56 


26.00 


.75 


5.88 



385.17 

951.58 
597.59 



817,649.28 



146 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



OVERLAY AND ABATEMENT. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1893 $3,542.20 

Taxes, amount added by the assess- 
ors for convenience in appor- 
tionment, to be applied to 
abatem.ents on taxes . . $3,889.35 

Cash, taxes collected . . . 19.60 



3,908.95 

Balance to debit in account 1895 . . . 4,073.85 



$11,525.00 
Debit. 

Taxes, amounts of abatements on taxes $11,139.83 

Nathan Tufts Park, amount transferred 385.17 

$11,525.00 

OVERPLUS AND TAX SALES. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1893 $102.13 

Debit. 
Balance to 1895 $102.13 

POLICE. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $25,000.00 

Cash, received of Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, National bank 
and corporation taxes . . $22,225.59 
Herbert A. Chapin, clerk of court, 

officers' fees, fines, etc. . . 4,038.50 

John M. Fisk, master of house of 

correction, fines, etc. . . 1,491.50 

New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rebates . . . 276.25 

28,031.84 



Amoii-nt carried forward .... $53,031.84 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR' S REPORT. 



U" 



Amount brought forward . 

Debit 

Cash, paid M. C. Parkhurst, chief 
Robert R. Perry, captain . 
Edward McGarr, sergeant . 
Christopher C. Cavanagh, ser 

geant .... 
Dennis Kelley, sergeant 
Eugene A. Carter, sergeant 
John F. Johnson, patrolman 
John E. Fuller, patrolman . 
Samuel A. Brown, patrolman 
George L. Smith, patrolman 
Edward M. Carter, patrolman 
George W. Bean, patrolman 
George A. Bodge, patrolman 
Phineas W. Skinner, patrolman 
Hubert M. Miller, patrolman 
Edward E. Hamblen, patrolman 
John Hafford, patrolman . 
Albion L. Staples, patrolman 
George H. Carleton, patrolman 
Judson W. Oliver, patrolman 
Francis A. Perkins, patrolman 
Charles S. Thrasher, patrolman 
Wm. H. Johnston, patrolman 
Charles E. Woodman, patrolman 
Arthur E. Keating, patrolman 
John G. Knight, patrolman 
Stephen S. Smith, patrolman 
Jacob W. Skinner, patrolman 
Theodore E. Herron, patrolman 
David A. Bolton, patrolman 
Ulysses G. Skinner, patrolman 
James M. Harmon, patrolman 
Michael T. Kennedy, patrolman 

Amounts carried forward . 



853,031.84 



$1,900.00 
1,500.00 
1,200.00 

1,200.00 
1,200.00 
1,200.00 
1,095.00 
1,095.00 
1,095.00 
1,095.00 
1,095.00 
1,095.00 
1,095.00 
1,095.00 
1,086.00 
1,095.00 
1,095,00 
1,095.00 
1,095.00 
1,095.00 
1,095.00 
1,095.00 
1,088.00 
1,095.00 
1,095.00 
1,089.00 
1,071.00 
1,095.00 
1,080.00 
1,086.00 
1,060.75 
1,060.25 
1,060.25 

837,541.25 



853,031.84 



148 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amowits brought forward . . $37,541.25 $53,031.84 
Charles W. Stevens, patrolman . 1,060.25 
Ira S. Carleton, patrolman . 1,060.25 
Ezra A. Dodge, patrolman . . 1,060.25 
Eugene H. Gammon, patrolman 1,060.25 
James J. Pollard, patrolman . 989.50 
Daniel G. Simons, patrolman . 984.75 
Samuel Burns, patrolman . . 612.50 
Frederic H. Googins, patrolman . 610.00 
Jotham Chisholm, patrolman . 562.50 
John A. Ray, special patrolman . 338.50 
Gideon E. Dean, special patrol- 
man 2.00 

John A. Dadman, special patrol- 
man ..... 55.75 
Jeremiah J. Meaney, special pa- 
trolman . . . . . 9.00 
Fred S. Young, special patrolman 21.00 
John F. Cotter, special patrolman 13.00 
Peter J. Savage, special patrolman 13.00 
Peter Savage, special patrolman . 5.00 
Cornelius J. Cahill, special pa- 
trolman ..... 5.00 
Michael J. Davis, special patrol- 
man 13.00 

James F. Henderson, special pa- 
trolman ..... 5.00 
Davis P. Bucknam, special patrol- 
man . . . . . ■ 2.50 
Louis B. Tucker, special patrol- 
man ..... 2.50 
Andrew F. Arnold, special patrol- 
man ..... 2.50 
Michael J. Fitzpatrick, special 

patrolman .... 2.25 

A. A. Lewis, special patrolman . 8.00 



Amounts carried forward . . $46,039.50 $53,031.84 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 140 

Amounts brought forward . . $46,039.50 $53,031.84 

Seba F. Coffin, special patrolman 8.00 

N. L. Pennock, special patrolman 8.00 

Daniel H. Rinn, special patrol- 
man 8.00 

Wm. H. Blaisdell, special patrol- 
man 8.00 

B. F. Sheridan, special patrolman 8.00 

Lambert M. Maynard, special 

patrolman .... 8.00 

Alfred M. Sibley, special patrol- 
man 8.00 

Lewis R. Stewart, special patrol- 
man 8.00 

Daniel R. Spike, special patrol- 
man 8.00 

Edward T. Peterson, special pa- 
trolman ..... 4.00 

William H. Whitcomb, special 

patrolman .... 4.00 

William H. Kelley, labor on 

stable 12.50 

Frank Nicholson, line man . 33.00 

j\L C. Parkhurst, salary as lockup 

keeper 100.00 

M. C. Parkhurst, disbursements . 10.00 

Daniel G. Simons, disbursements 4.98 

Samuel Burns, disbursements . 8.00 

Wm. H. Johnston, disbursements 3.72 

George H. Carleton, disburse- 
ments ..... 3.29 

Robert R. Perry, disbursements . 8.00 

Edward M. Carter, disbursements .45 

Charles S. Thrasher, disburse- 
ments ..... 5.75 

Dennis Kelley, disbursements . 37.60 



Amounts carried forward . . $46,346.79 $53,031.84 



150 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought fo?'ward . 

Eugene H. Carter, disbursements 

Lemuel H. Snow, disbursements 

Mar}^ A. Staples, matron 

P. J. Blancbard, meals for pris- 
oners . . . . . 

H. B. Matthews, meals for pris- 
oners . . . . . 

F. G. Ray & Son, laundering 
C. B. Chene}^ photographs 
George D. Ford, photographs 
Charles W. Dailey, use of ambu- 
lance . . . . . 

Scoville Mfg. Co., buttons . 
John H. Kelley, badges 
Pettingill-Andrews Co., electrical 
supplies . . . . 

Gillis & Gleeson, electrical sup- 
plies . . . . . 
J. A. & W. Bird & Co., electrical 
supplies . . . . 
David Cutter, electrical supplies 
Municipal Signal Co., signal boxes 
Union Glass Co., battery jars 
John P. Lovell Arms Co., supplies 

G. F. & S. E. Sturtevant, supplies 
Howe & Flint, supplies 
M. L. Vinal, stationery 
W. Schuebeler, towels 
J. H. Brooks, dry goods 
L. D. Miller, polish 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
R. M. Sturtevant, supplies . 
Lakeside Novelty Co., disinfectant 
Imperial Chemical Co., disin- 
fectant . . . . . 



$46,346.79 

31.54 

18.05 

113.50 

51.25 

4.50 
27.79 
10.75 

1.00 

4.50 

29.81 

5.50 

329,53 

100.75 

3L65 

1.80 

354.60 

21.50 

51.20 

1.00 

1.45 

2.50 

4.15 

6.25 

2.50 

15.29 

23.67 

6.53 

4.25 

2.50 



§53,031.84 



Amounts carried forward 



$47,606.10 



$53,031.84 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



151 



A7nounis brought forward . 
George H. Cowdin, drugs . 
James Bartley, supplies 
Fresh Pond Ice Co., ice 
New England Telephone & Tele 

graph Co., rentals and tolls 
Fulton O'Brion, hay and grain 
Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel 
Austin & Doten, ventilator . 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 
Somerville Journal Co., stationery 
A. E. Martell & Co., letter book 
W. A. Greenough & Co., direc 

tories .... 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
M. R. Warren, books . 
Somerville Electric Light Co. 

hooks .... 
I. H. Brown & Co., carpentering 
Elijah Walker, carpentering 
Union Square Carriage Co., repairs 

of wagon 
Ezra A. Dodge, repairs 
Seward Dod2;e, blacksmithinsr 
J. A. Chabot, repairs of safe 
Daniel Crocker, repairing clock 
Wm. J. Blaisdell, painting . 
Welch & Hall, horse . 
Andrew A. Lamont, buggy . 
E. Spalding, harness work . 
Ira L. Roberts, horseshoeing 
J. H. Thompson, carriage hire 
James F. Fitzgerald, carriage hire 
L. H. Brown, carriage hire . 
M. G. Staples, teaming 
J. Robinson, teaming . 



847,606.10 

1.75 

3.69 

30.00 

756.90 

227.18 

71.30 

6.50 

45.05 

4.C0 

3.00 

4.00 
3.00 
5.50 

1.80 
3.85 
3.00 

9.50 

.75 

1.18 

1.50 

2.00 

1.50 

150.00 

150.00 

12.95 

59.00 

2.00 

20.50 

19.00 

53.25 

11.35 



853,031.84 



Amounts carried foi'iuard 



849,271.10 



$53,031.84 



152 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



A m u n ts bro 24 gh t fo rwa rd 
James Horrill, teaming 
C. M. Blake, newspapers 
S. J. Wood, filing saws 
Charles S. Robertson, premium of 
insurance .... 
Warren H. Smith, labor in stable 
Wm. H. Kelley, labor in stable 
James L. Prentiss, lineman 
F. A. Blackburn, lineman 
Frank Draper, lineman 
Frank Nicholson, lineman 
Harry Clifford, lineman 
R. McDonald, lineman 
L. McDonald, lineman 
Benjamin Pond, lineman 
James T. Barrett, witness fees 
William H. Barrett, witness fees 
Charles E. Farnham, expressing 
W. E. Cole, expressing 
E. R. Perham, expressing . 
Bancroft's Express, expressing 

Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to credit of account 



$49,271.10 

1.00 

14.70 

.75 

39.00 

274.00 

144.00 

153.57 

80.00 

66.00 

195.00 

24.76 

19.13 

19.13 

1.00 

6.00 

10.00 

2.50 

.50 

.80 

.45 

$50,323.39 
2,708.45 



$53,031.84 



$53,031.84 



POLICE STATION INCIDENTALS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... 

Schoolhouse Incidentals, amount transferred 
Cash, received of Commonwealth of 

Massachusetts, rent of armory . $300.00 

William E. Cassidy, old junk . 7.00 

Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of account . 



$3,500.00 
600.00 



307.00 
559.80 



Amount carried forward . 



$4,966.80 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



153 



Amoicnt brought fo7'ward . .... 

Debit. 

Cash, paid Wm. D. Hayden, janitor . $850.00 
Cambridge Gas Light Company, 

gas ..... 921.77 
City of Boston, water . . . 92.40 
Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel . 381.75 
Baker-Hunnevvell Co., fuel . 5.75 
Walter Bates & Son, concreting . 27.00 
James F. Davlin, plumbing . . 32.17 
J. A. Durell, plumbing . . 320.64 
A. A. Sanborn, steam fitting . 88.79 
A. M. Godfrey, carpentering . 54.00 
John P. Thompson, carpentering 18.55 
Frank A. Fuller & Co., carpenter- 
ing 2.36 

David G. Marston, carpentering . 25.00 

C. A. Slager, carpentering . . 100.53 

H. B. Sellon, carpentering . . 104.00 

Geo. W. Manning, repairs of roof 3.50 

S. W. Fuller, lumber . . . 35.83 

F. C. Ayer, lumber . . . 16.97 

Jacob Woodbury, iron work . 5.55 

Henry P. Lovering, mason work . 11.90 

A. C. Winning, mason work . 855.20 

Clarence G. Reed, plastering . 43.00 

J. Q. Twombly, painting . . 38.24 

W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware . 62.97 

Howe & Flint, hardware . . 5.00 

Whitney & Snow, hardware . 3.30 

F. C. Fuller & Son, hardware . 7.06 

Boston Belting Co., hose . . 12.38 

A. M. Prescott, teaming . . 3.00 
H. W. Johns Manufacturing Co., 

paints, etc. . . . .' 25.71 
The Boston Germicide Co., germi- 
cide service .... 21.63 



34,966.80 



Amounts carried fo7"ward 



14,175.95 



$4,966.80 



154 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . .■ $4,175.95 $4,966.80 

J. F. Fuller, disinfectant . . 4.50 

Hatch & Farnham, furniture . 295.50 

Jackson Caldwell & Co., furniture 8.00 

James Bartley, matches, etc. . 5.60 

George H. Cowdin, powder . 1.20 

R. M. Sturtevant, tacks . . 1.30 

Albert B. Franklin, ventilating 

pipes 60.00 

The Great American & China 

Tea Co., water set . . . 2.00 

J. H. Keenan, boards ... 9.00 
A. B. Wedgwood, premium of 

insurance .... 150.00 
Foster & Shaw, premium of in- 
surance ..... 150.00 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection 

and Insurance Co. . . . 50.00 

Patrick O'Connell, labor . . 51.75 
Seth H. Whitcomb, cleaning 

carpet ..... 2.00 

-^ $4,966.80 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Credit. 




Appropriations, amount assessed . 


• 


Debit. 




Cash, paid Somerville Journal Co., 




printing and advertising . 


$1,373.08 


Citizen Pubhshing Co., printing 




and advertising 


502.50 


Beacon Lithograph Co., printing 




bonds ..... 


154.25 



$6,500.00 



Amounts carried forward . . $2,029.83 $6,500.00 



APPENDIX '10 TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 155 

Amounts brought foj'-ward . . 82,029.83 §6,500.00 

Babb & Stephens, printing . . 68.50 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 2,606.40 

Charles B. Stevens, register re- 
cording ..... 5.81 

Henry W. Pitman, printing annual 

reports, etc. .... 1,370.04 

W. A. Greenough & Co., direc- 
tories ..... 15.00 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., direc- 
tories ..... 15.00 

Charles S. Binner & Co., books . 3.50 

A. E. Martell & Co., letter books 15.00 

Frost & Adams, scales . . 5.50 

F. S. Buck, hand stamps . . 18.71 

Bates Manufacturing Co., number- 
ing machine .... 20.00 

The Heliotype Printing Co., maps 4.50 



§6,177.79 



Excess and Deficiency, balance 

to credit of account . . 322.21 



86,500.00 



PROPERTY AND DEBT BALANCE. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1893 $701,711.82 

Public Property, property acquired during the year 

1894 214,059.82 

Reduction of Funded Debt 107,000.00 



81,022,771.64 



Debit. 

Appropriations, amount borrowed on 

Funded Debt account . . $172,000.00 

Balance to credit in account 1895 . 850,771.64 



81,022,771.64 



156 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed .... 

Cash, received of West End Street Railway Co., cut- 
ting grass . . . .... 

Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of 
account ........ 



Debit 

Cash, paid laborers . 

Frank G. Williams, sods 
N. F. McCarthy & Co., plants 
J. Newman & Sons, plants . 
Horace L. Eaton, plants, etc. 
Green Brothers, plants, etc. 
Chetham Parks, materials . 
Joseph Breck & Sons, grass seed 

etc. .... 
G. W. Manning, labor on flagstaff 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
F. C. Ayer, Agent, lumber 
I. H. Brown & Co., lumber 
J. A. Durell, hardware 
Whitney & Snow, tools 
M. D. Jones & Co., settees 
J. B. Dupontj hardware 
W. I. Heald, tools, etc. 
C. L. Underhill, repairs of tools 
Joseph Young, repairs of tools 
L. A. Wright, repairs of tools 
George W. Trefren, Jr., carpen 

tering .... 
T. F. Farrington, carpentering 
J. Q. Twombly, painting 

Amotcnts ca7'riedforivard . 



$3,618.50 

25.96 

126.17 

11.18 

7.65 

1.50 

3.00 

74.61 

35.00 

27.22 

33.52 

.45 

4.99 

67.07 

61.80 

17.37 

43.16 

10.90 

9.00 

4.25 

24.86 

30.00 

1.81 

$4,239.97 



$4,500.00 
18.00 

187.94 

$4/705.94 



$4,705.94 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



157 



Amounts brought forward . 
Osgood & Hart, grating 
A. M. Prescott, teaming 
George W. Prichard, teaming 
John Silk, loam . 
L. M. Maynard, manure 
Monroe, Lalor & Co., ashes 
City of Boston, water 
Fitchburg Railroad, freight 
John R. Farnham, trees 
F. C. Fuller & Co., hardware 
Charles E. Farnham, expressing 
Boston Spar Co., flagstaff . 
M. A. Mann, repairing flag 
Sewers Maintenance account 

bricks .... 
Water Service account, service 

pipe .... 



$4,239.97 

1.25 

51.76 

48.00 

22.50 

13.10 

104.53 

35.00 

48.35 

20.00 

2.93 

2.00 

42.75 

1.50 

1.00 

71.30 



84,705.94 



84,705.94 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed . . . . 
Cash, received of County Treasurer re- 
turn on amount received of the 

city for dog licenses in 1893 . 82,710.90 

J. S. Hayes, librarian, fines . 297.87 

J. S. Hayes, catalogues . . 35.35 

Balance from 1893 . . . .... 

Debit. 

Cash, paid Little, Brown & Co., books 81,328.64 
Lee & Shepard, books . . 222.95 

George E. Littlefield, bocks . 408.24 

Amou7its carried forward . . $1,959.83 
(11) 



86,500.00 



3,044.12 
23.36 

89,567.48 



89,567.48 



158 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brot^ght forward . 
Estes & Lauriat, books 
Burnham Antique Book Store 

books .... 
Charles H. Brown, books . 

C. A. Nichols Co., books 
S. B. Fisher, books 
Boston Book Co., books 
T. C. Pease, books 
Charles E. Houghton, books 
Outlook Company, books . 
Fred S. Collins, books 
Osterhout Free Library, books 
S. M. Goss, books 

J. Q. Adams & Co., books . 
Kasson & Palmer, books 
W. L. Wilder, books . 

E. R. Pelton, books . 
Catholic World, books 
John B. Walker, books 
Eben Putnam, books . 

D. Appleton Co., books 
Joseph Eichbourn & Co.; books 
Prince Society, books . 
Writer Publishing Co., books 
New England Magazine, books 

F. H. Chadbourne, books . 
American Naturalist, books 
Wm. R. Bradford, books 
H. W. Conant, books . 
John Munsell's Sons, books 
New England Historical & Geneo 

logical Society, books 
Hessling & Spielmeyer, books 
T. H. Castor & Co., books . 
Rhode Island Historical Society 

books .... 

Amounts carried forward . 



$1,959.83 
353.98 

113.30 

126.30 

15.00 
1.56 

21 Ao 
6.50 

15.00 
4.00 

31.10 
2.20 

74.48 
4.00 
3.00 
8.00 
4.00 

12.00 
1.50 
2.00 

34.00 
3.00 
5.00 
1.75 
4.00 

39.60 
4.00 

12.00 
3.33 
5.00 

3.00 

6.75 

74.32 

2.00 

$2,956.95 



,567.48 



$9,567.48 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



159 



Amounts brought fo7"ward . 
J. S. Smith & Co., books 
Arena Publishing Co., books 
S. C. Tuckerman, books 
The Critic Company, books 
Cupples & Paterson, books 
Century Company, books 
North American Review, books 
The Dial, books . 
Publisher's Weekly, books . 
Engineering Magazine, books 
Electrical Engineer, books . 
Electric Magazine, books . 
New England Kitchen Publishing 

Co., books 
Review of Reviews, books . 
Forum Publishing Co., books 
Charles Scribner's Sons, books 
William H. Guild & Co., books 
J. B. Lippincott Co., books 
Harper & Brothers, books . 
Illustrated American Co., books 
E. H. Hames & Co., books . 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., books 
Perry Mason & Co., books . 
The Nation, books 
Cosmopolitan Magazine, books 
Montague Marks, books 
Munn & Co., books 
W. A. Greenough & Co., direc 

tory .... 
P. B. Sanford, binding books 
Somerville Journal Company 

printing 
Greenough, Adams & Gushing 

stationery 

Ajjiounts carried forward . 



$2,956.95 
2.00 
5.33 
3.00 
4.75 
5.00 

24.00 
4.25 
4.15 

12.60 
2.40 
4.50 
4.00 

1.75 
5.00 
2.75 

35.94 

99.14 
4.50 

32.97 
4.00 
2.00 

11.40 
1.75 
3.00 
3.00 
6.50 

11.20 

2.00 
766.67 

97.35 

26.59 

S4,150.44 



$9,567.48 



$9,567.48 



160 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts broiiglit forivard . . $4,150.44 $9,567.48 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 18.95 

1 ohn Underwood &: Co., stationery 5.25 

Rice, Kendall & Co., paper . 59.48 

George N. Seamans & Co., screen 3.50 

Howe & Flint, gas fixtures . . 9.90 

Boston Gas Appliance Exchange, 

fixtures 20.00 

E. R. Morse Safe Co., safe . . 72.50 

VV. S. Barnes, boxes . . . 9.10 

A. Storrs & Bement Co., cards . 39.33 
Library Bureau, tray, etc. . . 8.00 
Derb}^, Kilmer & Pond Desk Co., 

furniture . . . . 11.50 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., furniture . 9.80 
Williams Table & Lumber Co., 

table 56.00 

Wemyss Brothers, chests . . 16.00 

W. S. Badger & Co., bookcase . 17.00 

B. P. Palmer, door stop . . 2.50 
Sprague & Hathaway Co., frames 24.42 
Horgan, Robey & Co., frames . 2.00 
William I. Stickney, plate . . 7.00 
Henry Holt, polish . . . 3.50 
Boston Belting Co., hose . . 5.95 
W. A. Sanborn, bricks . . 3.03 
George B. Sargent, stamps . . 3.13 
Citizen PubUshing Co., news- 
papers . . . . . ' 4.00 

C. M. Blake, newspapers . . 9.00 
Graham & Hill, newspapers . 4.50 
George T. Bailey, newspapers . 4.50 
Fred. C. Fuller, carpentering . 20.42 
Henry P. Lovering, Jr., mason- 
work 4.98 

A. A. Sanborn, steam-fitting . 1.35 

Amounts caiiied forwai'd . . $4,607.03 $9,567.48 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



161 



A m u n is b ro ugh t fo rwa rd . 
George H. Maynard & Co. 

plumbing 
J. Q. Twombly, painting 
Osgood & Stevens, labor 

C. A. Southwick, labor 
William Eccles & Son, upholstery 
Gillis & Gleeson, telephone 
F. W. Merrill, tubes . 

D. F. Erickson, blocks 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
William Hall & Co., hardware 
H. S. Garcelon, Agent branch 

office .... 
Charles E. Farnham, expressing 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 
Perham's Express, expressing 
Edward F. Wood, premium of in 

surance .... 
Dana W\ Bennett & Co., premium 

of insurance . 
I. B. Kendall, premium of insur 

ance .... 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
Somerville Electric Light Co. 

lighting .... 
City of Boston, water 
J. W. Coveney, postage stamps 
B. F. Wild & Co., fuel 
Baker-Hunnewell Co., fuel . 
S. J. Wood, keys, etc. 
John S. Hayes, librarian 
Disbursements . 
Anna L. Stone, assistant 
Mary J. Warren, assistant . 
F. Mabel Norcross, assistant 



$4,607.03 

5.45 

101.24 

8.16 

6.25 

46.20 
4.10 

15.00 
5.00 
4.69 
2.75 

100.00 
32.30 
64.05 

87.85 

33.75 

33.75 

75.00 
4.90 

403.18 

29.00 

31.00 

168.96 

7.25 

1.25 

1,800.00 

66.86 

400.00 

400.00 

275.00 



89.567.48 



Amounts carried foj'ward 



88,820.06 



89,567.48 



162 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



AiJiounts b7'ought forward . . $8,820.06 

Edith A. Woodman, assistant . 75.24 

M. Gertrude Knapp, assistant . 125.97 

Elizabeth Goldsmith, assistant . 20.52 

Esther M. Mayhew, assistant . 117.96 

Catherine Coveney, assistant . 12.05 

M. B. Merriam, assistant . . 160.00 

S. C. Foot, assistant . . . 91.00 

Charles L. Goodrich, assistant . 9.51 

Wm. C. Hammond, assistant . . 42.77 

Stanley Flewelling, assistant . 61.02 

Charles F. Cuddy, assistant . 21.83 

$9,557.93 
Excess and Deficiency, balance to 

credit of account . . . 9.55 



§9,567.48 



$9,567.48 



PUBLIC LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount appropriated by borrowing 

on Funded Debt account ... - $3,000.00 

Debit. 
Balance to debit in account 1895 .... $3,000.00 



PUBLIC PROPERTY. 

Credit. 
Balance to debit in account 1895 . . . . 

Debit. 

Property and Debt Balance, property 

acquired in 1894 . . . $ 214,059.82 
Balance from 1893 . . . 1,981,211.82 



12,195,271.64 



$2,195,271.64 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 163 

REAL ESTATE LIENS. 

Credit. 
Balance to 1895 8964.70 

Debit. 

Balance from 1893 .... 8888.40 

Taxes, Interest and Costs on property 
deeded to the city for non-pay- 
ment of taxes of 1892 . . 7G.30 

S964.70 



84,858.50 



REDUCTION OF FUNDED DEBT. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1893 8 5,912.07 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... 100,000.00 

Cash, received of London and Lancan-' 
shire Fire Insurance Co., insur- 
ance on Webster Schoolhouse . 81,185.00 

Queen Insurance Co., insurance 

on Webster Schoolhouse . 1,185.00 

Tetonia Fire Insurance Co.,insur- • 

ance on Webster Schoolhouse . 723.50 

New Hampshire Fire Insurance 
Co., insurance on Webster 
Schoolhouse .... 1,185.00 

Peter Malone, proceeds of sale of 
material of Webster School- 
house 80.00 

F. M. Burrows, sale of Brastow 

Schoolhouse .... 100.00 

First Congregational Society of 
Somerville, sale of L'nitarian 
Church . . . . . 400.00 



City of Boston, water rates trans- 
ferred 5,486.30 10,344.80 



A7nount carried forward ..... 8116,256.87 



164 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

A7nount brought forivard . .... $116,256.87 

Debit. 

Property and Debt Balance, amount 
of reduction of Funded Debt 
in 1894 . . . . . $107,000.00 

Balance to credit in account 1895 . 9,256.87 

$116,256.87 



RELIEF AND BURIAL OF INDIGENT SOLDIERS 
AND SAILORS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $4,000.00 

State of Massachusetts, burials ..... 140.00 

Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of account . 1,440.06 



Debit. 

Cash, paid monthly pay rolls . . $5,083.00 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital, board 169.46 

Danvers Lunatic Hospital, board 2.79 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

board 47.11 

Fred B. Clapp, services as nurse 42.50 

W. A. Frink, services as under- 
taker 70.00 

Wm. A. Flaherty, services as 

undertaker .... 35.00 

John Reade, services as undertaker 35.00 

Alfred E. Mann, services as under- 
taker 35.00 

City of Medford, aid furnished . 19.20 

Support of Poor account, aid fur- 
nished 41.00 



>,580.06 



$5,580.06 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 165 

SALARIES. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... 835,400.00 

Excess and Deficiency, balance to 

debit of account . . .... 2,645.03 



Debit. 

Cash, paid William H. Hodgkins, 

mayor §1,000.00 

George I. Vmcent, city clerk . 2,400.00 
John F. Cole, city treasurer and 

collector of taxes . . . 3,200.00 

Selvvyn Z. Bowman, city solicitor 1,650.00 

Alvah B. Dearborn, city physician 1,150.00 

Charles S. Robertson, city auditor 500.00 
Charles S. Robertson, clerk of 

common council . . . 250.00 

William P. Mitchell, clerk of com- 
mittees 1,650.00 

Albert B. Fales, clerk of assessors 1,500.00 

Beulah M. Pierce, assistant to 

treasurer .... 800.00 

Alice T. Sleeper, assistant to 

treasurer .... 700.00 

Amy L. Manning, assistant to city 

clerk 700.00 

Clara B. Snow, assistant to city 

clerk , 349.00 

Katharine W. Wood, assistant to 

clerk of assessors . . . 650.00 

Frederic W. Cook, assistant to 

clerk of committees . . 800.00 

Jairus Mann, city messenger . 1,500.00 

Thomas R. Roulstone, inspector 

of buildings .... 1,900.00 



$38,045.03 



Amounts carried forward . . 820,699.00 838,045.03 



16G 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . 
D.C.Greene, inspector of plumbing 
G. F. Andrews, inspector of 

plumbing .... 

Thomas Cunningham, inspector 

of milk ..... 
Thomas Cunningham, inspector 

of provisions .... 
Horace L. Eaton, city engineer 
Leighton W. Manning, supt. of 

electric lines .... 
Benjamin F. Thompson, assessor 
Samuel T. Richards 
Nathan H. Reed 
Fred B. Clapp, assistant assessor 
Charles F. Farrington, assistant 

assessor .... 

Edgar T. Mayhew, assistant 

assessor ..... 
Harry A. True, assistant assessor 
Cromwell G. Rowell, registrar of 

voters ..... 
Charles P. Lincoln, registrar of 

voters ..... 
Charles E. Parks, registrar of 

voters ..... 
George I. Vincent, registrar of 

voters ..... 
William H. Whitcomb, janitor of 

City Hall and Public Library . 
Charles A. Southwick, janitor of 

City Hall and Public Library , 
Florence M. Grow, clerical 

services .... 

Jessie O. Smith, clerical services 
Eliza D. Foster, clerical services 
Engineer's assistants . 



$20,699.00 $38,045.03 
800.00 

275.00 

300.00 

400.00 
2,400.00 

1,000.00 
900.00 
800.00 
800.00 
250.00 

250.00 



250.00 




250.00 




200.00 




200.00 




200.00 




200.00 




779.16 




70.84 




296.01 




70.67 




58.67 




6,595.68 






S3S,045.03 





APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



167 



SCHOOL CONTINGENT. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed 
Cash, received of D. F. McCurdy, 
tuition of non-resident pupils . 

Emma F. Wiiitney, tuition of non- 
resident pupils 

George J. Raymond, tuition of 
non-resident pupils 

Charles A. Lovekin, tuition of 
non-resident pupils 

Lena Gilbert, tuition of non-resi- 
dent pupils .... 

Harry T. Wing, tuition of non- 
resident pupils 

Clifton Williams, tuition of non- 
resident pupils 

G. A. Southworth, injury to books, 
etc. ..... 

Charlestovvn Gas and Electric Co., 
discount . . . . 

Debit 

Cash, paid Gordon A. Southworth 
salary as supt. of schools 
Disbursements 

V. E. Hapgood, clerk in superin- 
tendent's office 

L. H. Sno\y, truant officer . 
Services taking school census 

Jairus Mann, truant officer . 

Leach, She\vell& Sanborn, books 
etc. .... 

American Book Co., books, etc. 

Ginn & Co., books, etc. 

Amounts carried forward . 



816,000.00 



$ 16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
8.00 
15.00 
16.00 
30.00 
33.23 
24.00 



82,499.96 
41.38 

600.00 

999.96 

100.00 

50.04 

434.82 
653.04 
654.82 

S6,034.02 



174.23 



816,174.23 



$16,174.23 



168 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought foi^ward . 
D. C. Heath & Co., books, etc. 
William Ware & Co., books, etc. 
Maynard, Merrill & Co., books 

etc. .... 

Boston School Supply Co., books 

etc. .... 

University Publishing Co., books 

etc. .... 

Houghton, Miftlin & Co., books 

etc. .... 

Carl Schoenhof, books, etc. 
D. Lothrop & Co., books, etc. 
J. L. Hammet, books, etc. . 
Silver, Burdett & Co., books, etc 
Lothrop Publishing Co., books 

etc. . 

T. H. Castor, books, etc. 
Lee & Shepard, books, etc. 
Allyn & Bacon, books, etc. . 
Elbridge & Brother, books, etc. 
Greenough, Adams & Cushing 

supplies . • . . 

C. W. Bardeen, supplies 
Joseph Watrous, supplies . 
W. A. Greenough, supplies 
Holden Patent Book Cover Co. 

supplies 
Hub Book Binding & Stationery 

Co., supplies . 
Longmans, Green & Co., supplies 
Educational Publishing Co., books 
John E. Potter & Co., books 

D. Appleton & Co., books . 
Franklin Educational Co., sup- 
plies . . . . . 



$6,034.02 

286.28 

44.19 

38.30 

106.51 

73.02 

183.91 
4.35 
6.60 

377.37 
1,102.37 

11.80 
110.65 
17.55 
36.15 
13.12 

602.24 

565.08 

658.69 

2.00 

28.20 

11.65 
21.04 
5.67 
81.65 
14.00 

50.63 



S16,174.2o 



Amounts carried foj'ward . 



810,487.04 



$16,174.23 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 169 

Amounts brought forward . . 810,487.04 816,174.23 

Geo. S. Perry & Co., supplies . 17.25 

Frost & Adams, supplies . . 154.20 

Pulsifer, Jordan & Co., supplies . 36.70 

Prang Educational Co., supplies . 1,183.51 

George S. Perry & Co., ink wells 8.65 

A. W, Mitchell, stamp . . 2.54 

Wadsworth, Rowland & Co., sup- 
plies ..... 18.15 

E. O. White, flowers . . . 4.80 

P. P. Caproni & Co., drawing 

materials .... 10.00 

A. H. Hewes «Sc Co., drawing 

materials .... 8.80 

King & Merrill, stationery . . 1,552.54 

Thorp & Martin Co., stationery . 18.97 

George S. Perry & Co., stationery 245.91 

Thompson, Brown & Co., station- 
ery 93.23 

Somerville Journal Co., printing . 386.30 

Citizen Publishing Co., printing . 119.30 

Boston Bank Note & Lithograph 

Co., diplomas . . . 100.47 

C. A. French, filling in diplomas 88.35 

Edward E. Hale, address . . 25.00 

First M. E. Church, use of edifice 100.00 

R. M. Yale & Co., repairing flags 4.65 

Union Glass Co., sand . . .27 

L. H. Brown & Co., carriage hire 7.50 

New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., rentals and tolls . 64.30 

Somerville Electric Light Co., 

lighting 15.09 

Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas . 169.11 

Charlestown Gas & Electric Co., 

gas 189.47 



Amounts carried forward . . 815,112.10 816,174.23 



170 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . 
City of Boston, water 
J. E. Parsons, hardware 

E. S. Daniels, tuning pianos 
John C. Haynes & Co., pitch pipes 
Dame, Stoddard & Kendall, sup- 
plies .... 

F. C. Baldwin, disbursements 
C. M. Coffin, sewing materials 
S. Henry Hadley, music 
M. J. Wendall, disbursements 

G. M. Wadsworth, ribbon . 
J. S. Emerson, ribbon 
C. E. Brainard, ribbon 

F. C. Baldwin, ribbon 

G. E. Nichols, ribbon 

F. W. Shattuck, ribbon 
S. A. Johnson, ribbon 

G. P. Fisk & Co., ribbon . 
J. W. Coveney, rent of Post-Office 

box .... 
Cole's Express, expressing . 
Charles A. Farnham, expressing 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 
Perham's Express, expressing 
Bancroft's Express, expressing 
Stilphen & Co., expressing . 

Excess and Deficiency, balance 
to credit of account 



$15,112.10 

593.90 

1.25 

9.00 

15.14 

122.34 
5.30 
5.08 

63.53 
9.27 
4.00 
4.00 
5.81 
7.90 
3.60 
2.12 
3.20 

12.16 

2.00 

2.00 

37.35 

1.45 

.90 

.30 

2.40 

^16,026.10 
148.13 



$16,174.23 



6,174.23 



SCHOOL CONTINGENT, JANITORS' SALARIES. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed .... $11,000.00 

Amount cari'ied forward ..... $11,000.00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



171 



A m 02int bro ugh t fo rw a rd 

Debit. 

Cash, paid janitors' salaries as per pay 
rolls ..... 
Excess and Deficiency, balance to 
credit of account 



811,000.00 



810,686.13 



13.8' 



SCHOOL FUEL. 



Credit. 



Appropriations, amount assessed . . . . 
Cash, received of F. ^1. Burroughs, coal from Bras- 
tow Schoolhouse . . . . . . 



Debit 

Cash, paid B. F. Wild & Co., fuel 
Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel 
George M. Winslow & Co., fuel 
Baker, Hunnewell Co., fuel 



Excess and Deficiency, balance to 
credit of account 



$3,289.96 

3,309.38 

1,406.65 

942.13 

88,94.^.12 
78.63 



811,000.00 



89,000.00 

26.75 

89,026.75 



$9,026.75 



SCHOOLHOUSE, BINGHAM ADDITION. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1893 . . . . . . . 

Appropriations, amount appropriated by borrowing 
on Funded Debt account . ... 

Ai7iou7it carried forward ..... 



88,290.00 

1,000.00 

89,290.00 



172 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amoiuit b7'oug]it fo7'ward .... 89,290.00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid John Kelley on account of 

contract and extra work . . $4,842.99 

A. A. Sanborn, heating apparatus 3,635.84 

H. W. Johns Mfg. Co., asbestos 75.33 

James F. Davlin, plumbing . 75.00 

Fuller & Matthews, carpentering 8.40 

Moulton L. Libby, clocks . . 20.00 

Walter Bates & Son, concreting . 95.40 

H. B. Sellon, labor . . . 25.75 
Chandler Adjustable Chair & Desk 

Co., furniture .... 362.25 

P. Derby & Co., furniture . . 29.67 

E. R. Perham, expressing . . 32.24 

M. G. Staples, expressing . . 4.00 



$9,206.87 



Excess and Deiiciencv, balance to 

credit of account . . . 83.13 



$9,290.00 



SCHOOLHOUSE, EDGERLY ADDITION. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1893 % 456.67 

Appropriations, amount appropriated 

by borrowing on Funded Debt 

account 2,000.00 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Smith Heating and Venti- 
lating Co., on account of heat- 
ing apparatus .... $1,696.50 



$2,456.67 



Amounts carried forward . . $1,696.50 $2,456.6' 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 173 

$1,696.50 82.456.67 



Amoinits brought forward . 
H. W. Johns Manufacturing Co., 
asbestos . . . . . 

A. C. Winning, mason work 
F. C. Ayer, Agent, lumber . 

Balance to credit in account 1895 



50.50 
44.95 
4a.24 



$1,837.19 
619.48 



$2,456.6' 



SCHOOLHOUSE, ENGLISH HIGH. 



Credit. 



Balance from 1893 



Debit. 

Cash, paid W. S. Sampson on account 

of contract .... 
W. S. Sampson, extras 
Hartwell & Richardson, architects 
J. F. Bubert, electrical work 
John M. Woods, services as 

referee ..... 
Willard C.'Hill, premium of in- 
surance .... 
Joseph Young, labor . 
Fred Young, labor 
H. B. Sellon, labor 
Henry A. Angier, labor 
Charles Bridges, labor 
Water Maintenance account, 

labor and material . 
Water Services account, labor 

and material .... 
Sewer Assessments account, sewer 

Balance to credit in account 1895 
(12) 



840,000.00 

1,893.40 

1,000.00 

500.00 

150.00 

75.00 
5.00 
70.00 
33.25 
64.00 
82.50 

6.48 

167.70 
138.00 

$44,185.33 
37,296.67 



$81,482.00 



$81,482.00 



174 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCHOOLHOUSE, HIGH AND ENGLISH HIGH, HEATING, 
VENTILATING AND PLUMBING. 

Credit. 



Appropriations, amount appropriated 
by borrowing on Funded Debt 
account . . 



$35,000.00 



Debit. 



Cash, paid A. A. Sanborn on account 
of contract for heating appa- 
ratus, etc. . . . . 
Jarvis Engineering Co., air shafts 
W. S. Sampson, extras on account 

of heating plant 
Fred C. Fuller, carpentering 
Frank A. Fuller & Co., carpenter 

ing .... 

D. P. Bucknam, mason work . 
H. W. Johns Manufacturing Co. 

asbestos .... 
Clarence G. Reed, plastering 
James Tucker & Son, plumbing 
J. Lincoln Collins, wire guards 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
City of Boston, water . 
Committee on Public Property, 
travelling expenses . 



Balance to credit in account 1895 



$22,811.74 
1,006.20 

714.94 

119.85 

63.63 

228.88 

60.07 
211.73 
2,440.99 
23.20 
17.28 
56.40 

42.37 

$27,797.28 
7,202.72 



S35,000.00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 175 



SCHOOLHOUSE INCIDENTALS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $12,000.00 

Cash, received of Dana W. Bennett, 
Agent, return premium of in- 
surance ..... $61.80 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection 
& Insurance Co., returned 
premium of insurance . . 50.00 
William E. Cassidy, old iron . 1.00 112.80 



Excess and Deficiency, balance to 

debit of account . . .... 3,609.59 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Chandler Adjustable Chair 

& Desk Co., furniture . . $889.60 
P. Derby & Co., furniture . . 55.67 
Jackson Caldwell & Co., furniture 9.00 
Winchester Furniture Co., furni- 
ture 18.80 

Derby, Kilmer & Pond Desk Co., 

furniture .... 9.00 

H. A. Pestell, shades . . . 67.40 

H. W. Tarbell, shades . . 2.75 

R. H. White & Co., rugs . . 15.50 

S. W. Choate, Agent, slate boards 143.94 

I. L. Corthell, electric work . 13.03 

Corthell & Pollard, electric work 5.63 

Fuller & Matthews, carpentering . 141.67 

John D. Hills, carpentering . 147.51 

Osgood & Stevens, carpentering . 29.23 



$15,722.39 



Amounts carried forzvard . . $1,548.73 815,722.39 



176 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . 

C. A. Slager, carpentering . 
John R. Thompson, carpentering 
F. A. Chandler, carpentering 

F. Burckes, carpentering 

D. G. Marston, carpentering 
George W. Trefren, Jr., carpenter 

ing .... 

W. O. Francis, carpentering 
Frank A. Fuller & Co., carpenter 

ing .... 

H. S. Brackett, carpentering 
Charles H. Dyer, carpentering 
F. S. Aldrich, carpentering . 
Architectural Wood Working Co. 

carpentering . 
H. B. Sellon, carpentering . 
H. W. Covell, plumbing 
James F. Davlin, plumbing . 
J. E. Parsons, plumbing 

C. W. Cahalan, plumbing . 
W. L. Snow, plumbing 

D. G. Green, plumbing 

W. J. Kennedy, plumbing .. 
James Tucker & Sons, plumbing 
J. A. Durell, hardware, etc. 
Howe & Flint, hardware, etc. 
Wm. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 

etc. .... 

W. I. Heald, hardware, etc. 
John A. Merrifield, hardware, etc 
Whitney & Snow, hardware, etc. 
F. C. Fuller & Son, ventilator 

etc. .... 

Charles A. Holmes, stove work 
J. W. Johnson, mason work 



11,548.73 

24.30 

38.92 

6.00 

15.00 

116.55 

25.10 
18.00 

515.82 
12.10 

143.18 
92.50 

24.21 

232.50 

15.03 

27.81 

159.50 

8.13 

15.31 

5.32 

177.10 

11.30 

829.47 

1,178.00 

168.52 

60.65 

154.66 

5.45 

270.61 

6.73 

38.70 



$15,722.39 



Ainounts carried fo7'ward 



$5,945.20 



$15,722.39 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 1 t i 

Amounts brought forioard . . 85;945.20 8lo,722.39 

Henry P. Lovering, Jr., rnason 

work 100.59 

D. P. Bucknam, mason work . 215.37 
J. M. Burckes, mason work . 3.50 
Clarence G. Reed, mason work . 238.25 

A. C. Winning, mason work . 85.24 
Thomas Dowd, mason work . 40.00 

B. E. Higgins, mason work . 268.00 
Fred Davis, mason work . . 4.12 

J. F. Burton, painting and glaz- 
ing ..... 14.75 

Ramsay Clark, painting and glaz- 
ing 1.00 

W. J. Logan, painting and glazing 13.25 

M. J. Goodwin, painting and glaz- 
ing ..... 4.50 

Frank S. Norris, painting and glaz- 
ing 8.00 

Daniel VV. McDermott, painting 

and glazing .... 18.75 

J. H. HoUis, painting and glaz- 
ing 20.25 

E. T. Peterson, painting and glaz- 
ing ..... 97.50 

E. B. Jones, painting and glazing 51.25 

James Scott, painting and glazing 177.50 

E. F. Palmer, painting and glaz- 
ing 120.00 

R. Daley, painting and glazing . 112.50 

Frank H. Smith, painting and 

glazing 80.00 

S. Cotton Pennock, painting and 

glazing 30.00 

J. Q. Twombly, painting and glaz- 

ins: 494.43 



Amounts carried forward . . 88,143.95 815,722.39 



178 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . . $8,143.95 
H. W. Johns Mfg. Co., paints, etc. 429.24 
G. F. Ericson, repairs of furniture 249.35 
H. A. Chick & Co., repairs of fur- 
niture . ... . 6.80 
F. H. Harding, repairs of furni- 
ture 12.50 

George W. Manning, repairs . 95.75 

F. H. F'lagg, repairs . . . 1.25 

Walter Bates & Son, concreting . 504.00 

Wilbur P. Rice, door and frame . 2.80 
Somerville Iron Foundry, ring and 

cover ..... 4.60 

Williams & Co., soapstone work 130.80 

Jarvis Engineering Co., traps . 159.70 

Carlisle, Ayer & Co., doors . 13.44 

Boston Spar Co., flagstaff . . 75.30 

L. C. Seavey, roofing . . . 121.52 
Smith Heating & Ventilating Co., 

furnace work .... 46.35 

Sullivan & Naughton, gas-fitting . 9.78 

T. L. DeLano, gas-fitting . . 4.00 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., supply 

pipe ..... 26.51 
Somerville Electric Light Co., arc 

light 12.00 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., batter- 
ies ..... 2.35 
Pettingill-Andrews Co., batteries 2.29 
A. A. Sanborn, steam-fitting . 56.27 
George F. Perry & Co., ink wells 118.14 
W. G. Hallock, dust brushes, etc. 174.50 
Thomas Groom & Co., books . 7.00 
Hinkley Bros. & Co., rope . . 3.80 
W. H. Bullard, oil ... 1.02 
P. Sutherland & Co., oil . . 16.44 



$15,722.39 



Amounts carried forward 



$10,431.45 



$15,722.39 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



179 



A7no lints brought forward 

Mark A. Torrey Co., soap 

H. W. Burgess, sand . 

R. M. Sturtevant, salt 

M. M. Percell, supplies 

Boston Germicide Co., germicide 

J. F. Fuller & Co., disinfectant 

F. C. Ayer, Agent, lumber . 

I. H. Brown & Co., lumber 

S. W. Fuller, lumber . 

Wm. H. Wood & Co., lumber 

Cunningham Iron Works Co 

boiler work . 
George A. Richards, moving 

boiler .... 
F. D. Snow, door checks 
J. Lincoln Collins, wire work 
William Hall & Co., locks . 
S. J. Wood, keys, etc. 
F. D. Weld, ladders . 
F. A. Titus, gas-fitting 
Jacob Woodbury, tools 
Seward Dodge, tools . 
Percey N. Kenway, inspecting 

heating apparatus . 
Ehjah Walker, services as referee 
C. O. Stone, services as referee 
Boston Belting Co., hose 
H. W. Smith & Co., clock work 
George F. Horton & Co., clock 

work .... 
David Cutter, clock work . 
Daniel Crocker, clock work 
Moulton C. Libbey, clock work 
Henry W. Pitman, printing 
Anthony Hadabolets, rent . 



§10,431.45 

35.00 

.50 

.35 

.90 

20.40 

4.50 

137.30 

31.66 

12.32 

14.78 

362.55 

10.00 

9.50 
142.00 

9.82 
71.80 
32.70 

7.90 
19.80 

2.55 

25.00 
15.00 
7.50 
35.25 
21.00 

33.00 

35.00 

84.50 

2.00 

8.00 

325.00 



$15,722.39 



A m tints carried fo 7 ward 



$11,949.03 



$15,722.39 



180 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forwat-d . 


$11,949.03 


$15,722.39 


Michael J. Coneeney,pruning tree 


3 21.25 




Daniel Mclntire, vines 


1.00 




Woodbridge Hotel, refreshment' 


5 6.00 




Thomas Thurlow, labor 


6.00 




Patrick O'Connell, labor 


41.38 




N. L. Pennock, labor 


2.00 




A. B. Colesworthy, labor 


32.75 




C, A. South wick, labor 


60.20 




A, A. Lewis, labor 


9.00 




H. McCarthy, labor . 


13.75 




H. H. Mayville, labor 


20.00 




John O'Brien, labor . 


12.00 




W. H. Denton, labor . 


2.00 




Wm. H. Kelley, labor 


40.00 




George H. Goss, labor 


12.50 




D. H. Rimm, labor . 


15.00 




F. A. Wellman, labor 


97.50 




W. H. Laskey, labor . 


1.75 




Fred F. Young, labor 


52.00 




P; Bowdren, labor 


55.00 




M. Steavens, labor 


23.00 




Wilfred Young, labor . 


22.00 




E. J. Young, labor 


23.00 




J. F. Walker, labor . . . 


23.00 




Mrs. Aylward, labor . 


15.00 




Mrs. Barnes, labor 


17.00 




Mrs. Fitzsimmons, labor 


17.50 




Mrs. Gilman, labor 


12.00 




Mrs. Hartness, labor . 


17.00 




Mrs. Shiner, labor 


12.00 




J. H. Thompson, carriage hire . 


12.50 




George F. McKenna, carriage hire 


34.00 




R. A. R. Benson, teaming . 


25.75 




M. G. Staples, teaming 


43.25 




Owen Cunningham & Son, team- 






ing 


1.00 





Amounts carried forward . 



$12,748.11 



$15,722.39 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



181 



Amounts brought forward . 
George W. Prichard, teaming 
John Silk, teaming 
E. R. Perhara, expressing . 
Charles E. Farnhara, expressing 
Mclntire & Co., expressing 
Martin O'Shaughnessy, expressing 
A. G. Renner, expressing 
Gilman Express Co., expressing 
Cummings & Co., expressing 
Roxbury Medical Co., polish 
James Deacon, whitewashing 
R. M. Johnson, removing soil 
Hinckley & Woods, premium of 
insurance .... 

I.E. Kendall, premiumof insurance 
Arthur P. Hatch, premium of in- 
surance ..... 
George W. Foster, premium of 
insurance . . . . 

H. W. P. Colson, premium of in- 
surance ..... 
Willard C. Hill, premium of insur- 
ance ..... 
Charles S. Robertson, premium of 
insurance .... 
William A. Muzzey, premium of 
insurance .... 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspector 
& Insurance Co., premium of 
insurance .... 

Water Services account, water 
services ..... 
Sidewalks account, edgestone 

Police Station Incidentals, amount 
transferred .... 



812,748.11 

49.25 

12.50 

40.05 

4.00 

.50 

1.00 

.50 

1.50 

1.50 

4.50 

10.00 

48.00 

56.94 
112.50 

90.00 
112.50 

90.00 
600.00 
450.00 

75.00 

450.00 

75.70 

88.34 

$15,122.39 
600.00 



815.722.39 



$15,722.39 



182 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCHOOLHOUSE, O. S. KNAPP ADDITION. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount appropriated by borrowing 
on Funded Debt account .... 

Debit. 
Cash, paid John Kelley on account of 

contract and extras . . $10,318.10 

Loring & Phipps, architects . 325.00 
Braman, Dow & Co., heating 

apparatus .... 1,000.00 
Chandler Adjustable Chair and 

Desk Co., furniture . . 772.10 

P. Derby & Co., furniture . . 32.33 

Charles S. Robertson, insurance . 40.00 

James F. Davlin, plumbing . 14.95 

J. A. Durell, gas-fitting . . 18.10 

Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas . 23.13 

Clarence G. Reed, plastering . 4.25 

P. Bowdren, grading . . . 8.00 

Charles H. Dyer, labor . . 8.75 

George H, Goss, labor . . 26.25 

David G. Marston, labor . . 21.25 

C. A. Southwick, labor . . 6.25 

E. R. Perham, expressing . . 5.00 

$12,623.46 
2,876.54 



$15,500.00 



Balance to credit in account 1895 



$15,500.00 



SCHOOLHOUSE, WARD FOUR, SOUTH SIDE FITCHBURG 
RAILROAD. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1893 $ 4,244.61 

Appropriations, amount appropriated by borrowing 

on Funded Debt account .... 12,000.00 



AjJiouftt carried foi'ward . 



$16,244.61 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



183 



Amoiait brought forward . 



816,244.61 



Debit. 



Cash, paid Frank G. Coburn & Co. on 

account of contract and extras $13,156.83 
Samuel Dudley Kelley, archi- 
tect 750.00 

A. A. Sanborn, on account of con- 
tract for heating apparatus . 1,000.00 
Chandler Adjustable Chair and 

Desk Co., furniture . . 719.60 

P. Derby & Co., furniture . . 10.50 

William Hall & Co., brass work . 17.17 

Holland & Daniels, shades . . 50.40 

F. Burckes, carpentering . . 10.00 
George W. Trefren, carpenter- 
ing ..... 15.70 

John D. Hills, carpentering . 52.56 

G. H. Harding, carpentering . 7.50 
H. B. Sellon, carpentering . . 8.75 
F. W. Choate, blackboards . 270.75 
W. H. Wood & Co., lumber . 77.34 
F. C. Aver, Agt., lumber . . 7.48 
F. C. Fuller & Co., hardware . .52 
Willard C. Hill, premium of in- 
surance ..... 7.50 

E. R. Perham, expressing . . 5.00 
David G. Marston, labor . . 8.75 
George H. Foss, labor . . 2.50 

F. S. Aldrich, labor . . . 6.25 
P. Bowdren, labor ... 5.00 



Balance to credit in account 1895 



$16,190.10 
54.51 



816,244.61 



184 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCHOOL TEACHERS SALARIES. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $125,000.00 

Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of 

account ........ 3,755.39 



Debit. 
Balance from 1893 . . . . S 9,833.92 

Sewers, assessments levied . . 12,112.61 



$128,755.39 
Debit. 

Cash, paid salaries as per pay rolls .... $128,755.39 

SEWER ASSESSMENTS. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of sundry persons . $11,359.93 
Sewers, abatements to sundry per- 
sons . . . . . 233.50 

Balance to debit in account 1895 . 10,353.10 

$21,946.55 



$21,946.53 



SEWERS, CONSTRUCTION. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1893 $ 256.75 

Appropriations, amount appropriated 

by borrowing on Funded Debt 

account 20,000.00 

Cash, received of West End Street 

Railway Co., catch basin . . $ 17.44 

Joseph F. Wilson, private sewer . 70.93 

Henry Green, fee for entering 

Line street sewer . . . 100.63 

189.00 



Amount carried forward ..... $20,445.75 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



185 



Amount brought forward .... 
J. E. Parsons, constructing sewer 

in Pearl street ... % 97.97 

Sidewalks account, edgestones, 

etc 37.41 

Highways, City Stable account, 

sewer 702.21 

Highways account, catch basin 

curbs ..... 6.91 

Sewer Assessments, assessments levied 



$20,445.75 



844.50 
12,112.61 



$33,402.86 



Debit 

Cash, paid laborers . 

George D. Goodrich, drain pipe 
W. A. Sanborn, bricks 
Wm. R. Maxwell, bricks 
D. Warren De Rosay, bricks 
Osgood (Sj: Hart, catch basin 

covers .... 
Barbour, Stockwell & Co., traps 
Sweatt & Gould, catch basin 

stones .... 
Pigeon Hill Granite Co., catch 

basin stones . 
David W. Lewis, grate, etc. 
Whitney & Snow, cement 
J. E. Herrick, cement 
Charles L. Underbill, blacksmith 

ing .... 

Mechanics Iron Foundry Co., tide 

gates .... 
I. H. Brown & Co., arch and circle 
A. C. White, carpentering . 

AmoiC7its carried forward . 



$3,307.27 

2,868.69 

251.30 

157.95 

287.20 

143.10 
137.50 

416.00 

607.00 
36.00 

176.56 
17.85 

2.50 

28.00 
3.58 
3.00 



$8,443.50 



$33,402.86 



186 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amou7its brought forward . 
W. P. Rice, lumber 
Horatio Wellington & Co., wood 
Owen Cunningham & Co., sand 
Charles J. Simpson, sand 
M. W. Carr, sand 
Sylvester & Co., iron rods . 
Thomas Groom & Co., books 
Citizen Publishing Co., advertis 

ing .... 

Somerville Journal Co., advertis 

ing .... 

A. M. Prescott, teaming 
John Silk, teaming 

George F. McKenna, teaming 
Ernest W. Danforth, inspecting 
Fred E. Jones, inspecting . 
R. W. Pond, inspecting 
Charles B. Stevens, Register, re 

cording .... 
E. A. Pinnock, typewriting . 
John H. Stevens, award for dam 

ages .... 
Philip & R. Nutting, award for 

damages 

B. W. Cotton, award for damages 
Christopher Burke, sewer in 

Warwick street 
Christopher Burke, sewer in 

Broadway and Liberty avenue . 
Christopher Burke, sewer in 

Summit street 
Christopher Burke, sewer in 

Kenwood street 
Christopher Burke, sewer in 

Billingham street 

Amounts car7'ied forward . 



$8,443.50 
1.85 
1.00 
3.75 
5.60 
3.00 
5.13 
17.00 

21.00 

28.75 
701.15 

53.75 
5.00 

48.00 
3.50 
2.06 

25.71 
19.35 

50.00 



$33,402.86 



50.00 




100.00 




1,587.10 




875.12 




55.46 




65.60 




63.23 




12,235.61 


$33,402.86 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER \ND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 187 

A77ioiints brought forward . . 812,235.61 833,402.86 

Richard Falvey, sewer in Banks 

street ..... 38.15 

Richard Falvey, sewer in Elm 

street 158.78 

Richard Falvey, sewer in Fran- 

cesca avenue . . . 525.90 

Richard Falvey, sewer in Talbot, 

Packard and Sawyer avenues . 1,-i 13.42 

Crimmings & Collins, sewer in 

Rogers avenue . . . 201.82 

Crimmings & Collins, sewer in 

ElHngton road . . . 64.36 

Crimmings & Collins, sewer in 

Hall avenue .... 2,242.13 

Crimmings & Collins, sewer in 

Charnwood road . .. . 52.53 

Crimmings & Collins, sewer in 

passageway off Newbury street 44.25 

Crimmings & Collins, sewer in 

Summer street . . . 571.00 

Dennis C. Collins, sewer in Vine 

court 36.00 

Charles Linnehan, sewer in Granite 

street 81.94 

Willard B. Bryne, sewer in Billing- 
ham street .... 87.44 
Willard B. Bryne, sewer in 

Chandler street . . . 24.13 

Willard B. Brvne, sewer in (!}len 

street 83.59 

Willard B. Bryne, sewer in Pearl 

street place .... 90.43 

Willard B. Bryne, sewer in Con- 
gress place .... 45.46 
Willard B. Bryne, sewer in 

Wallace street . . . 23.23 



Amounts carried forward . . 818,021.07 833,402.86 



188 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . . $18,021.07 833,402.86 
Wi]lard B. Bryne, sewer in Broad- 
way 723.16 

Charles A. Moiigan, sewer in 

Broadway .. . . . 256.75 

Charles A. Mongan, sewer in 

Wheeler street . . . 159.65 

Charles A. Mongan, sewer in 

Tower street .... 49.82 

Charles A. Mongan, sewer in 

Pearl street .... 63.10 

Charles A. Mongan, sewer in 

Central street and Westwood 

road 1,095.61 

Charles A. Mongan, sewer in 

passageway off Cross street . 28.53 

Charles A. Mongan, sewer in Rich- 
dale avenue .... 12.50 
Charles A. Mongan, sewer in 

Jenny Lind avenue . . . 258.30 

Charles A. Mongan, sewer in 

Benton avenue . . . 56.35 

Charles A. Mongan, sewer in 

Putnam street . . . 217.57 

Charles A. Mongan, sewer in York 

terrace 22.74 

Charles A. Mongan, sewer in 

Leland street .... 133.20 

Charles A. Mongan, sewer in 

Summer street . . . 166.09 

Charles A. Mongan, sewer in 

North Union street . . 188.99 

Maurice Buttimer, sewer in 

Snow terrace .... 168.37 

Maurice Buttimer, sewer in 

Laurel place .... 224.75 



Amounts carried forward . . $21,846.55 $33,402.86 



821,846.55 


833,402.86 


1,433.48 




39.03 




1,130.65 




47.91 




93.80 





APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 189 

Amoicnis brought forwa7'd . 
Maurice Buttimer, sewer in Tal- 
bot, Sawyer and Packard avenues 
Maurice Buttimer, sewer in 

Melvin street .... 
Maurice Buttimer, sewer in 

private land and Kidder avenue 
Hervey A. Hanscome, sewer in 

West street .... 
Hervey A. Hanscome, sewer in 

Sycamore street . . . 

Hervey A. Hanscome, sewer in 

Lawrence street . . . 12.29 

Hervey A. Hanscome, sewer in 

School street .... 14,03 

Hervey A. Hanscome, sewer in 

private lands, Lowell, Woodbine 

and Centre streets . . . 63.25 

Charles A. Mongan, laying drain 32.74 

Water Works Extension account, 

pipe 9.40 

Highways, City Stable account, 

sewer ..... 468.16. 

Sewer Assessments, abatements . 233.50 



825,424.79 
Balance to credit in account 1895 7,978.07 



833,402.86 



SEWERS, MAINTENANCE. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... 87,000,00 

Cash, received of Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital, annual fee for 
permission to enter Fitchburg 
Street Sewer .... S50.00 



Amounts car7'ied forward . . $50.00 87,000.00 

(12a) 



190 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



A mo tints b7-ought forward . 
L. R. Wentworth and G. T. Blos- 
som, Trustees, dividend on bill 



$50.00 



$7,000.00 



for labor, etc. 


7.80 




Augustus T. Sawyer, labor, etc. 


6.25 




Christopher Burke, labor, etc. 


9.64 




W. B. Bryne, puddling 


8.64 




Richard Falvey, puddling . 


4.00 




Crimmings & Collins, puddling 


8.00 




Public Grounds account, bricks 


J 




etc. . . . 


1.00 


95.33 


Excess and Deficiency, balance to debit of 


account .... 


« • . . 


164.72 




$7,260.05 


Debit. 






Cash, paid laborers . 


$3,231.98 




George D. Goodrich, drain pipe 


35.24 




Whitney & Snow, tools anc 






cement ..... 


78.71 




J. E. Herrick, cement 


1.25 




F. C. Fuller & Co., tools . 


1.50 




M. W. Carr, sand 


.50 




Howe & Flint, pipe . 


.60 




T. F. Farrington, carpentering 


6.60 




Charles L. Underbill, blacksmith- 






ing ..... 


8.35 




F. Dooris, blacksmithing 


.60 




F. M. Fuller, wood . 


1.00 




F. C. Ayer, Agent, lumber . 


40.53 




I. H. Brown & Co., lumber 


1.40 




W. B. Bryne, labor 


23.45 




Wm. R. Maxwell, bricks 


.80 




W. A. Sanborn, bricks 


6.40 




D. Warren De Rosay, bricks 


8.00 





Amounts cai'ried forward . 



$3,446.91 



$7,260.05 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 19 1 

Amounts brought forward . . $3,446.91 $7,260.05 

Perrin, Seamans & Co., derrick . 105.00 

Wilson & Silsby, canvas . . 3.50 
Cornelius Callahan Co., repairs of 

hose ..... 2.59 
New England Dressed Meat and ' 

Wool Co., setting glass . . 2.25 

Robert Burlen, book binding . 18.00 

Thomas Groom & Co., books . 20.00 

Samuel White, rubber boots . 45.00 

Edson Mfg. Co., repairs of pump 2.35 

City of Boston, water . . . 40.00 

A. M. Prescott, teaming . . 1,092.88 

E. W. Danforth, inspecting . 6.00 

Fred E. Jones, inspecting . . 1.50 

R. W. Pond, inspecting . . 3.94 

George I. Shedd, car fares . . 68.10 
City of Cambridge, five-ninths 

cost of cleaning outlet of Bridge 

Street Sewer .... 2,402.03 

$7,260.05 



Debit. 

Cash, paid laborers .... $4,897.53 

W. J. McCarthy, edgestones . 5,222.84 

W. A. Sanborn, bricks . . 3,050.60 



SIDEWALKS. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed .... 810,000.00 

Cash, received of Schoolhouse Incidentals account, 

edgestones . . . .... 88.34 

Sidewalks, assessments levied .... 9,817.31 



$19,905.65 



Amoicnts carried forward . . $13,170.97 $19,905.65 



192 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts bi'ought forward . . $13,170.97 
N. M. Cofran & Co., bricks . 3,488.60 
Wm. R. Maxwell, bricks . . 848.00 
Somerville Journal Co., advertising 144.50 
Citizen Publishing Co., advertising 124.00 
Thomas Groom & Co., books . 26.00 
J. E. Herrick, cement . . 5.00 
Timothy F. Crimmings, teaming 5.00 
James Fannon, teaming . . 5.00 
Frank Grant, teaming . -. 10.00 
Martin Gill, teaming . . . 5.00 
John F. Elkins, teaming . . 5.00 
George F. McKenna, teaming . 15.00 
W. J. McLaughlin, teaming . 35.00 
Maurice Buttimer, teaming . 10.00 
Frank Buttimer, teaming . . 5.00 
Highways account, labor and ma- 
terials 1,897.74 

Sewers account, edgestones . 37.41 

Sidewalk Assessments, abatements 31.67 

$19,868.89 
Excess and Deficiency, balance to 

credit of account . . . 36.76 



$19,905.65 



$19,905.65 



SIDEWALK ASSESSMENTS. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of Sundry Persons 
Sidewalks, assessments abated 
Balance to debit in account 1895 



Debit. 



Balance from 1893 . 
Sidewalks, assessments levied 



54,635.12 
9,817.31 



$9,430.97 

31.67 

4,989.79 

$14,452.43 



$14,452.43 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 193 

STATE AID. 

Credit. 

State of Massachusetts, amount paid in 1894 charged 

to State S7,436.00 

Debit. 

Cash, paid monthly pay rolls . . ... 87,436.00 



STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount appropriated . . . 831,380.00 

Debit. 
Cash, paid State Treasurer, state tax .... $31,380.00 



STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS, METROPOLITAN SEWER. 

Credit. 
Appropriations, amount assessed .... $22,230.79 

Debit. 
Cash, paid State Treasurer, assessment of 1894 . 822,230.79 



STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS, NON-RESIDENT BANK 
STOCK. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... 8847.80 

Debit. 

Cash, paid State Treasurer, amount collected on non- 
resident stock . . .... 8847.80 



194 ANN[JAL REPORTS. 

STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS, BURIAL OF INDIGENT 
SOLDIERS AND SAILORS. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of the State Treasurer for burials in 

1893 $ 17.50 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1894, due from State Dec. 10, 

1895 ........ 157.50 



S175.00 



Debit. 

Balance from 1893 .... $ 35.00 

Relief and Burial of Indigent Soldiers 

and Sailors, amount paid for 

burials in 1894 . . . 140.00 



S175.00 



STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS, INDIGENT SOLDIERS 
AND SAILORS. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of State Treasurer .... $374.50 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1894, due from State Dec. 10, 

1895 282.00 



$656.50 



Debit. 

Balance from 1893 . . .• . $360.50 

Indigent Soldiers and Sailors, one half 

of amount paid in 1894 . . 296.00 



S656.50 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 194a 



STATE OF MASSACHUSETTS, STATE AID. 

Credit. 
Cash, received of State Treasurer .... 86,736.00 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1894, due from State Dec. 10, 

1895 7,312.00 



Debit. 
Balance from 1893 .... $6,612.00 

State Aid, amount paid in 1894 . . 7,436.00 



STREET LIGHTS. 

Credit. 



814,048.00 



814,048.00 



Appropriations, amount assessed 


. 


844,000.00 


Cash, received of Globe Gas Light Co., 


old lanterns 


165.00 




844,165.00 


Debit. 






Cash, paid Somerville Electric Light 






Co., lighting .... 


842,648.39 




Moving lights .... 


. 74.00 




Wheeler Reflector Co., lighting . 


39.60 




Weston Electric Instrument Co., 






instruments .... 


141.25 




M. G. Staples, teaming 


10.00 




Charles E. Farnham, expressing . 


1.60 




Leighton W. Manning, car fares 


3.90 




Patrick O'Connell, moving posts 


2.50 




Henry W. Pitman, printing 


30.35 




Somerville Journal Co., printing . 


4.25 





842,955.84 
Excess and Deficiency, balance to 

credit of account . . . 1,209.16 

844,165.00 



104b 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SUNDRY PERSONS. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1893 . 
Interest, coupons not paid 
Water Loan Interest, coupons not paid 



S 787.60 

1,380.00 

315.00 



S2,482.60 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Sundr}' Persons amounts 

due them .... 

Balance to debit in account 1895 



$ 592.50 
1,890.10 







tff ^ flK} ^ .\J\J 


SUPPORT OF POOR. 




Credit 






Appropriations, amount assessed 


. 


$15,000.00 


Cash, received for support of paupers 






Of State of Massachusetts 


^954.09 




Of City of Boston . 


466.22 




Of City of Cambridge 




265.49 




Of City of Lowell . 




6.00 




Of City of Maiden . 




13.60 




Of City of Medford 




61.05 




Of City of Newton . 




469.89 




Of City of Northampton 




24.65 




Of City of Waltham 




35.00 




Of City of Woburn 




21.35 




Of Town of Brookline 




2.00 




Of Town of Canton 




15.41 




Of Town of Lexington 




146.00 




Of Town of North Andover 


162.09 




Of Town of North Adams 


5.00 




Of Town of Revere 


114.55 




Of Town of Stoneham 




52.14 





Amounts carried forward 



$2,814.53 



$15,000.00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 19ic 

Amounts brought forward . . 82,814.53 815,000.00 

Of State of Massachusetts, 

burials .... 78.00 
Frank W. Kaan, guardian, aid 

furnished .... 84.96 

John C. Harris, aid furnished . 84.50 

Charles Cooper, aid furnished . 39.00 

Grace Farrell, aid furnished . 30.18 

Samuel Collieson, aid furnished . 169.47 

Patrick Buckley, aid furnished . 10.00 
W. H. Roach, money not called 

for 6.00 

Elizabeth J. Bullock, money not x 

called for ... . 5.00 
Andrew Maloney, money not 

called for ... . 3.00 
Malachi Butler, money not called 

for ..... 3.00 
Relief and Burial of Indigent Sol- 
diers and Sailors account, aid 

furnished .... 41.00 3,368.64 

Excess and Deficiency, balance to 

debit of account . . .... 1,304.49 



Debit. 

Cash, paid Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, support of paupers . 81,265.16 
Massachusetts School for the 

Feeble-minded . . . 508.29 
^Massachusetts Hospital for Dipso- 
maniacs, etc., support of paupers 152.03 
Worcester Lunatic Hospital . 2,228.99 
Worcester Insane Asylum . . 838.03 
Taunton Lunatic Hospital . . 79.85 
Danvers Lunatic Hospital . . 1,155.98 



819,733.13 



Amounts carried forward . . $6,228.33 819,733.13 



194d 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



A}fiou7its brought forward . 


$6,228.33 


$19,733.13 


Westboro Insane Hospital . 


1,104.54 




Somerville Hospital . 


537.79 




Boston Lunatic Hospital 


169.46 




House of the Angel Guardian 


96.00 




City of Boston . 


391.55 




City of Cambridge 




250.15 




City of Everett . 




52.40 




City of Worcester 




5.15 




City of Maiden . 




767.39 




City of Woburn . 




12.26 




Town of Chelmsford . 




111.55 




Town of Lexington 




63.21 




Town of Peabody 




546.09 




Town of Revere 




367.86 




Town of Raynham 




104.00 




Mary Burke, rent 




72.00 




John Murphey, rent 




84.00 




Ellen Driscoll, rent 




48.00 




Thomas Flemming, rent 


12.00 




Bridget Flemming, rent 


12.00 




Bridget Maher, rent . 


60.00 




Sarah Gill, rent . 


72.00 




A. E. Viles, Executor, rent 


72.00 




Maurice Terry, rent . 


10.00 




James Ambrose, rent . 


84.00 




EHzabeth Morrison, rent 


84.00 




Sarah Blake, rent 


5.00 




Michael Conlon, rent . 


42.00 




Malachi Butler, rent . 


24.00 




Owen McLaughlin, rent 


52.50 




O. H. Perry, Agt., rent 


70.00 




John Welsh, rent 


12.00 




Milo Scott, rent 


12.00 




Ann Kelley, board 


69.28 




Hannah M. Mayo, board . 


169.45 
$11,873.96 




Amounts carried forward . 


$19,733.13 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AXD COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



194e 



Afiiounts brought forward . 


. 


S11,873.9G 


819,733.13 


Ann H. Sawin . 




69.28 




Ellen M. O'Donnell, board 




104.30 




Morris Barry, board . 




104.30 




William R. Priest, board 




108.55 




Elizabeth Trainor, board 




3.43 




Charlotte Towle, board 




68.56 




Catherine Cronin, board 




94.00 




George Clapp, board . 




212.17 




Preston Cheney, board 




212.17 




C. H. Dunbar, board . 




195.86 




Hannah Egan, board . 




76.53 




W. H. Roach, board . 




18.00 




Mary Curran, board . 




44.00 




E. Wilcomb, board 




38.99 




A. B. Boynton, board 




29.14 




N. C. Desmond, board 




19.28 




W. H. Johnson, board 




87.44 




J. R. Parkin, nursing . 




12.64 




Margaret Dandley, nursing . 




6.00 




Reuben Dailey, nursing 




5.00 




J. H. Gordon, nursing 




10.00 




Mary Lynch, nursing . 




10.00 




James Bartley, groceries and 


pro- 






visions .... 


. 


96.00 




Medford Street Market, groceries 






and provisions 


. 


66.50 




A. F. Carpenter, groceries 


and 






provisions 


. 


132.00 




Lovell & Divoll, groceries 


and 






provisions 


. 


209.00 




W. P. Blanchard, groceries 


and 






provisions 


. 


50.00 




Wilham F. Ward, groceries 


and 






provisions 


. 


515.91 




C. A. Small, groceries and 


pro- 






visions . . • . 


• 


292.00 




Amounts canied forward . 


114,765.01 


819,733.13 



I04f ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . . $14,765.01 $19,733.13 

F. E. Robie & Son, groceries and 

provisions .... 27.00 

Sturtevant Brothers, groceries and 

provisions ... . . 222.00 

James Cuthbertson, groceries and 

provisions .... 6.00 

J. A. Litchfield, groceries and 

provisions .... 15.00 

D. E. Watson, groceries and pro- 
visions . . . . . 54.00 

Charles F. Butters, groceries and 

provisions .... 187.06 

Sawyer & Read, groceries and pro- 
visions ..... 445.50 

A. Munroe, groceries and pro- 
visions ..... 44.00 

A. L. Leighton, groceries and 

provisions .... 38.25 

W. H. Bullard, groceries and pro- 
visions ..... 196.99 

J. Canavan & Son, groceries and 

provisions .... 13.00 

John Canavan, groceries and pro- 
visions ..... 6.00 

F. H. Turner & Co., groceries 

and provisions . . . 3.50 

George J. Russell, groceries and 

provisions .... 31.33 

R. M. Sturtevant, groceries and 

provisions .... 229.00 

E. R. Lovell, groceries and pro- 
visions . •. . . . 27.00 

F. Rhoades, groceries and pro- 
visions . . . 12.00 

Henry Gray, milk . . . 13.83 



Amounts carried forward . . $16,336.47 $19,733.13 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



194g 



Amounts b?'ought forward . 

A. Fiske, crackers 

Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel . 

J. H. Mongan, boots and shoes . 

Philip Eberle, boots and shoes 

J. H. Brooks, dry goods 

E. B. Bradshavv, clothing 

Lakeside Novelty Co., disinfectant 

Somerville Journal Co., printing . 

Thomas Groom & Co., stationery 

New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Company, rentals and 
tolls 

J. Q. Twombly, painting 

M. G. Staples, teaming 

A. M. Prescott, teaming 

L. H. Brown, carriage hire 

Howard Lowell, carriage hire 

William Kirkland, carriage hire . 

Wm. A. Flaherty, services as un- 
dertaker .... 

P. H. Rafferty, services as under- 
taker ..... 

E. H. Marsh, services as under- 
taker ..... 

John S. McGowan, services as 
undertaker .... 

C. C. Eolsom, salary as agent 
Disbursements 

Cora F. Lewis, salary as secretary 



$16,336.47 

15.73 

739.77 

27.65 

85.70 

18.80 

5.50 

1.25 

5.50 

0.75 



78.25 
5.52 
5.75 
8.00 

18.00 
8.50 
2.00 

53.00 

20.00 

34.00 

41.00 

1,500.00 

312.99 

400.00 



819,733.13 



TAXES. 




Credit. 




Cash, received for taxes of 1889 


8 11.00 


" u 1390 


195.00 


u u u u 1S91 


216.40 



819,733.13 



Amount carried forward 



S422.40 



194h 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 

Cash, received for taxes of 1892 
u u u u 1893 

ii K it a 1894 



; 422.40 

33,831.00 

133,060.25 

562,885.52 



Real Estate Liens, titles to the city for non-payment 
of taxes of 1892 



Overlay and Abatement : 

Abatements on taxes of 1890 

a u 1891 

ii ic u ic 1892 

a u ic u 1893 

" a u a 1894 

Balance to debit in account 1895 : 

Being uncollected taxes of 1889 

" " '' " 1890 

" a u 1891 

u ii a 1892 

ii ii 1893 

a a a a 1894 



Debit. 
Balance from 1893 .... 
Appropriations, amount assessed for 

current expenses 
State of Massachusetts, amount 

assessed for State Tax 
State of Massachusetts, amount 

assessed for Metropolitan Sewer 
State of Massachusetts, amount 

assessed on Non-resident 

National Bank Stock 
County of Middlesex, amount 

assessed foi County Tax . 
Overlay and Abatement, amount 

added by the assessors 



$ 18.80 

63.40 

192.00 

6,107.30 

4,758.33 

$ 78.00 

12,616.00 

5,288.20 

6,381.50 

48,822.90 

153,521.68 



$730,199.17 
60.00 



11,139.83 



226,708.28 
$968,107.28 

246,941.75 
628,500.00 

31,380.00 

22,230.79 

847.80 

34,317.59 

3,889.35 
$968,107.28 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 1941 

TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1893 8219,800.00 

Cash, borrowed by authority of the 

City Council on city notes as 

follows : 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

nine months at 3J per cent. . $ 50,000.00 
F. S. Moseley & Co., eight months 

at 3 per cent. . . . 100,000.00 

Brewster, Cobb & Estabrook, 

four months at 2^^ per cent. . 100,000.00 
Brewster, Cobb & Estabrook, three 

months at 3 per cent . . 100,000.00 

Brewster, Cobb & Estabrook, four 

months at 3 per cent. . . 200,000.00 

550,000.00 



Debit. 
Cash, paid as follows : 

Blake Brothers & Co., eight 

months, 6 per cent. . . S 5,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 10,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 1,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 1,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 5,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 1,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 1,000.00 



$769,800.00 



Amoiinis carried forward . . $24,000.00 8769,800.00 



194 j 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward . . $24,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 1,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 1,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 1,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 1,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

miOnths, 6 per cent. . . 1,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 3,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 10,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 2,500.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 1,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., five months, 

21 days, 6 per cent. . . 50,000.00 
Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 4,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., four months, 

5J per cent 30,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., four months, 

5J per cent 20,000.00 

Blake Brothers & Co., twelve 

months, 6 per cent. . . 10,000.00 

Mary Langmaid, six months, 6 

per cent 4,000.00 

Trustees of Estate of William C. 

High, six months, 6 per cent. . 1,600.00 

E. Isalia Norwood, six months, 6 

per cent 2,000.00 



$769,800.00 



Amounts carried forward 



$167,100.00 $769,800.00 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 194k 

Amounts brought forward , . $167,100.00 $769,800.00 

Trustees of estate of Mary Hutch- 
inson, twelve months, 6 per 

cent 1,900.00 

George A. Hull, six months, 6 per 

cent 1,000.00 

G. T. Burnham, Trustee, six 

months, 6 per cent. . . 1,500.00 

Henry E. Wright, four months, 6 

per cent 1,000.00 

W. Irving Heald, nine months, 6 

per cent 2,000.00 

Charles A. Skinner, eight months, 

6 per cent 1,000.00 

Lavinia W. Smith, eight months, 

6 per cent 800.00 

Somerville Co-operative Bank, 

twelve months, 6 per cent. . 10,000.00 

Margaret Lawson, twelve months, 

6 per cent 1,500.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

nine months, 3J per cent. . 50,000.00 

F. S. Moseley & Co., eight months, 

3 per cent 100,000.00 

Brewster, Cobb & Estabrook, four 

months, 1^-^ per cent. . . 100,000.00 

Brewster, Cobb & Estabrook, three 

months, 3 per cent. . . 100,000.00 

First Congregational Society, on 

account of note dated May 22, 

1893, on demand at 4 percent. 26,000.00 



$563,800.00 
Balance to credit in account 1895 206,000.00 



$769,800.00 



(12b) 



194 1 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

WATER LOAN INTEREST. 

Credit. 
Cash, received of City of Boston, Water Rates . $15,415.00 

Debit. 
Cash, paid on Water Loan Debt : 

$253,000, one year, at 4 per cent. $10,120.00 

$1,000, six months, at 4 per cent. 20.00 

$94,500, one year, at 5 per cent. 4,725.00 

$10,000, one year, at 5J per cent. 3,760.00 

$15,415.00 



Debit. 

Balance from 1893 ... $ 596.67 

Cash, paid laborers . . . • . 21,784.63 
Nathaniel Dennett, salary as 

superintendent . . . 1,500.00 

Disbursements . . . 45.33 



WATER MAINTENANCE. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of City of Boston, Water Rates, amount 

appropriated $32,500.00 

Dudley F. Hunt, et. al., use of 

pipe as per contract . . $ 35.00 

Sundry Persons, turning off and 

on water .... 118.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

iron pipe, etc. . . . 13.95 

L. W. Dow, manure . . . 12.00 

School House, English High, 

labor and materials . . 6.48 

John Mack, error in pay roll . 10.50 

James Carr, money not called for 1.00 

196.93 



Water Services, amount transferred 147.65 



$32,844.58 



Amounts carried forward . . $23,926.63 $32,844.58 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



194m 



Atnounts brought forward . 
Frank E. Merrill, salary as clerk 

Disbursements 
Sidney E. Hayden, salary as engi 

neer .... 
G. F. and S. E. Sturtevant, hay 

and grain 
Fulton O'Brion, hay and grain 
J. A. Marsh, hay and grain . 
J. F. Ham, hay and grain . 
Nathan Tufts & Sons, hay and 

grain .... 
Seward Dodge, blacksmithing 
Charles Maguire, blacksmithing 
F. Dooris, blacksmithing 
P. F. Culleton, blacksmithing 
Edward O'Brien, blacksmithing 
J. B. Rufer, blacksmithing . 
Frank W. Leavitt, repairs of wag 

ons .... 

David W. Crocker, repairs o 

wagons .... 
Charles L. Underhill, repairs of 

wagons . . . . . 

I. B. Walker, repairs of wagons 
C. Casseau, painting wagon 
Ramsay Clark, painting 
George W. Trefren, Jr., carpenter 

ing .... 

J. E. Parsons, plumbing 
R. B. Baker, repairing shaft 
James Russell Boiler Works Com- 
pany, repairs of boiler 
F. C. Aver, Agt., lumber 
S. W. Fuller, lumber . 
I. H. Brown & Co., lumber 



823,926.63 

900.00 

7.95 

1,100.00 

459.21 
67.06 
20.52 
57.10 

27.02 

240.14 

70.25 

82.30 

16.35 

3.50 

1.00 

19.00 

33.00 

151.20 

13.50 

30.00 

5.55 

113.10 

12.50 

3.25 

250.75 
29.72 
66.81 
16.00 



832,844.58 



Amounts carried forward . 



$27,723.50 



$32,844.58 



194n 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought fo7-ward . 
Whitney & Snow, hardware 
W. E. Plumer & Co., hardware 
Wm. B. Holmes, hardware . 
Howe & FHnt, hardware 
Charles A. Holmes, hardware 
W. I. Heald, hardware 
Perrin, Seamans & Co., packing 

etc. .... 

Smith & Anthony Co., fittings 
Star Brass Mfg. Co., covers 
Somerville Iron P^oundry, castings 
Jaques Brothers, pattern work 
Eugene McDonald, painting, etc 
Henry R. Worthington, valve 
Peet Valve Co., repairs 
Coflfin Valve Co., repairs of 

hydrants 
George H. Sampson, fuse . 
Thomas Allen, heater 
A. C. Winning, mason work 
S. M. Winter, setting glass . 
J. Q. Twombly, setting glass 
Harris Landers, logs . 
Jeremiah Cahalen, logs 
Warren B. Plympton, polish 
Rufus W. Clark, polish 
C. W. H. Morton, ladder . 
I. G. Marston, washers 
F. E. Fitts Mfg. Co., jute . 
Sewall & Day Cordage Co. 

manila .... 
Henry C. Hunt Co., leather 
H. H. Harvey, steel . 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber 

Co., hose 

Amounts carried forward . 



^27,723.50 

90.00 

28.83 

5.22 

7.97 

12.25 

.67 

73.14 
136.40 

12.90 

34.00 
214.05 
148.75 

47.70 
3.85 

18.85 

3.45 

4.00 

32.45 

2.25 

2.25 

3.75 

8.00 

2.15 

2.00 

12.00 

23.75 

14.68 

9.55 
9.75 
5.50 

104.25 

$28,797.86 



$32,844.58 



$32,844.58 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



194o 



Amounts brought forward 
Boston Belting Co., hose 
Boston Lead Manufacturing Co. 

lead 
Boston Bolt Co., bolts 

D. J. Bennett, harness work 

E. Spalding, harness work 
George H. Cowdin, drugs 
Thomas HoUis, sponges, etc. 
Cochran Chemical Co., acid 
Frost & Adams, fluid . 
Adolph Sommer, viscol 
Elias Lathrop, ointment 
William F. Low, oil . 
Samuel Walker & Co., oil . 
Climax Gasolene Co., oil 
Sprague & Hathaway Co., frame 
David Cutter, clock work 
James Bartley, grass seed . 

E. S. Conant & Co., salt 
M. L. Vinal, directory 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 
Citizen Publishing Co., printing 
Thomas Groom & Co., books 

F. W. Barry, Beale & Co., sta 
tionery .... 

Walworth Manufacturing Co. 

tools .... 
Joseph Breck & Sons, tools 
Andrew J. Morse & Son, tools 
George W. Barnes, tools 
Waldo Bros., tools 
Key Stone Manufacturing Co. 

tools .... 
A. J. Wilkinson, tools . 
S. J. Wood, repairs of tools 



$28,797.86 
20.69 

24.83 

6.00 

14.10 

94.48 

4.80 

4.70 

3.41 

.20 

1.00 

2.00 

64.00 

28.86 

2.55 

4.45 

7.00 

11.46 

15.00 

2.00 

15.75 

14.25 

70.03 

26.67 

74.19 

9.30 

4.66 

161.15 

23.50 

10.25 
2.25 

2.75 



$32,844.58 



Amounts carried forward 



829,524.14 



$32,844.58 



194p 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



A m n n ts b ?-o ugh t fo rwa rd . 
George D. Goodrich, drain pipe 
Charles E. Farnham, expressing 
Stilphin & Co., expressing . 
J. H. Brooks, dry goods 
John S. Rice, pails 

A. P. Simpson, sand . 
Catherine Fitzgerald, sand . 
M. J. Fitzpatrick, sand 
Thomas Walsh, teaming 
John F. Elkins, teaming 
Grant & Co., teaming 
T. F. Crimmings, teaming . 
F. L. Grant, teaming . 
Owen Cunningham, teaming 
George F. McKenna, teaming 
M. P. Canfield, loam . 
Daniel Hoar, care of horse 
Horatio Wellington & Co., fuel 

B. F. Wild & Co., fuel 
Smith & Wiley, fuel . 
S. M. Fuller, fuel 
J. A. Porter & Co., fuel 
A. A. Elston, fuel 

Somerville Electric Light Co. 

lighting .... 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas 
New England Telephone & Tele 

graph Co., rentals and tolls 
H. S. Garcelon, use of telephone 
City of Boston, water . 
Fresh Pond Ice Co., ice 
Charles R. Simpson, veterinary 

services . 
R. M. Johnson, removing soil 



$29,524.14 

17.26 

.30 

1.25 

2.93 

11.75 

16.10 

25.00 

3.00 

161.00 

12.50 

61.50 

205.00 

57.00 

233.18 

125.00 

31.00 

15.00 

272.14 

496.65 

375.00 

15.00 

6.25 

2.00 

69.00 
33.47 

318.55 

5.65 

18.20 

20.77 

14.50 
4.00 



$32,844.58 



Amounts carried forward 



$32,154.09 



12,844.58 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 194q 

Amounts brought forward . . 832,154.09 832,844.58 

Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection 
& Insurance Co., premium of 



insurance . . . . 


100.00 




William J. Willard, compensation 






for damages . . . . 


129.90 




Nancy Richardson, compensation 






for damages . . . . 


25.00 




L. Willard, compensation for 






damages . . . . 


7.50 




J. J. Underbill, fuel . 


1.00 




Osgood & Hart, castings 


116.08 






$32,533.57 




Balance to credit in account 1895 


311.01 


832,844.58 






WATER SERVICES. 




Credit. 






Cash, received of Thomas Cooney, pipe 






and fittings, etc. 


8 9.40 




F. E. Whitcomb, pipe and fittings, 






etc. 


10.96 




Howe & Flint, pipe and fittings, 






etc. . . . . . 


1.23 




John B. Safford, pipe and fittings. 






etc. . . . . . 


20.32 




A. L. Proctor, pipe and fittings, 






etc. . . . . . 


10.00 




Nevermisit Tennis Club, pipe and 






fittings, etc. . . . . 


4.20 




A. L. Hollander, pipe and fittings, 






etc. . . . . . 


24.10 




W. K. Lewis & Son, pipe and fit- 






tings, etc. . . . . 


47.80 




L. B. Pillsbury, pipe and fittings, 






etc. .... 


23.46 





Amount carried forward 



$151.47 



I94r 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amomit brought forward . $1 5 1 .47 

Thomas Cotter, pipe and fittings, 

etc 12.90 

Grace S. Rice, pipe and fittings, 

etc. . ... . 19.75 

Wm. Franklin Hall, pipe and fit- 
tings, etc. .... 7.78 

J.O. Hayden, pipe and fittings, etc. 21.48 

Albert Follett, pipe and fittings, 

etc. ..... 15.75 

J. F. Sanborn, pipe and fittings, etc. 1 0.00 

Boston & Maine Railroad, pipe 

and fittings, etc. . . . . 20.45 

Highways account, pipe and fit- 
tings, etc. .... 34.95 

Public Grounds account, pipe and 

fittings, etc 71.30 

Fire Department, Hook and Lad- 
der Station, pipe, fittings, etc. . 26.90 

Fire Department, Chemical En- 
gine and Equipment, pipe, fit- 
tings, etc. .... 17.85 

Schoolhouse Incidentals account, 

pipe, fittings, etc. . . . 75.70 

Schoolhouse, English High, pipe, 

fittings, etc 152.70 

Fire Department, Central Fire 

Station, pipe, fittings, etc. . 91.00 

Thomas R. Roulstone, pipe, fit- 
tings, etc. .... 5.00 

Sundry persons, money not called 

for 2.50 

$737.48 
Water Service Assessments, cost 

of services laid . » . . 5,541.75 



Amount carried forward 



S6,279.23 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



194s 



A77i02int brought forward 



S6,279.23 



Debit 

Cash, paid laborers . 

Summer & Goodwin, fittings 
Perrin, Seamans & Co., fittings 
Braman, Dow & Co., pipe and fit 

tings .... 
A. J. Morse & Son, fittings . 
A. A. Sanborn, fittings 
Smith & Anthony Co., fittings 
Walworth Mfg. Co., fittings 
Osgood & Hart, fittings 
Somerville Iron Foundry, fittings 
Boston Lead Mfg. Co., pipe 
Smith & Winchester Co., pipe 
Waldo Bros., cement . 
Chapman Valve Manufacturing 

Co., valves 
Peet Valve Company, valves 
G. W. Barnes, tools 
D'Este & Seeley Co., screws 
Boston Bolt Co., bolts 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., blower 
Boston Belting Co., washers 
Globe Gas Light Co., globes 
Standard Brass Co., unions 
Miller & Shaw, machine work 
C. G. H. Bennink, castings 
I. B. Walker, repairs of wagon 
Nathan Tufts & Sons, grain 
J. A. Durell, plumbing 
H. W. Covell, plumbing 
Somerville Journal Co., printing 

and stationery 
Citizen Publishing Co., printing 



$2,688.89 

1,209.17 

354.43 

27.45 

4.00 

1.42 

332.80 

240.83 

122.36 

345.28 

225.67 

24.86 

60.00 



2.80 

5.25 

40.88 

10.31 

5.00 

3.82 

1.05 

130.75 

70.49 

10.29 

2.50 

86.49 

3.73 

3.15 

20.00 
21.00 



Amounts carried forward 



$6,092.33 



$6,279.23 



194t ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts brought forward . . $6,092.33 $6,279.23 
J. O. Hayden, rebate on bill . 9.25 
Nathan Simonds, rebate on ser- 
vice assessments . . . 30.00 



$6,131.58 



Water Maintenance, balance trans- 
ferred 147.65 



$6,279.23 



WATER SERVICE ASSESSMENTS. 

Credit. 

Cash, received of sundry persons, water services . $6,978.25 

Balance to debit in account 1895 .... 84.40 



Debit. 
Balance from 1893 .... $1,520.90 
Water Services, pipes laid in 1895 . 5,541.75 



Debit. 

Cash, paid N. C. Barker, overseeing . $498.00 

Charles Booth, watering . . 469.77 

Christopher Burke, watering . 388.17 

Richard T. Blackwell, watering . 372.43 



$7,062.65 



$7,062.65 



WATERING STREETS. 

Credit. 

Appropriations, amount assessed .... $7,000.00 

Cash, received of abutters . . . $7,951.02 

Edward L. Grant, second-hand 

carts ..... 75.00 

8,026.02 



$15,026.02 



I 



1 



Amounts carried forward . . $1,728.37 $15,026.02 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



194u 



Amounts brought forward . 
Frank Buttimer, watering 
G. W. Cummings, watering 
Owen Cunningham, watering 
John F. Elkins, watering 
Richard Falvey, watering 
Martin Gill, watering . 
Henry Gray, watering 
Henry McAvoy, watering . 
Philip McGovern, watering 
George F. McKenna, watering 
A. M. Prescott, watering 
George W. Prichard, watering 
Henry J. Turner, watering . 
Benjamin Thomas, watering 
John Walsh, watering . 
Seward Dodge, repairing carts 
I. B. Walker, repairing carts 
L. A. Wright, repairing carts 
Charles W, Ingalls, repairing carts 
J. Miller, repairing carts 
Birch Brothers, repairing carts 
F. Dooris, repairing carts . 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber 

Co., hose 
F. C. Ayer, lumber 
W. E. Plummer & Co., lock 
Citizen Pubhshing Co., advertising 
Somerville Journal Co., advertising 
Thomas Groom & Co., book 
City of Boston, water . 
J. L. & H. K. Potter, watering 

carts . . . . . 



Excess and Deficiency, balance to 
credit of account 



$1,728.37 

388.17 

469.77 

385.02 

42.5.57 

381.87 

408.57 

408.57 

473.17 

394.97 

502.59 

502.59 

502.59 

502.59 

369.28 

315.76 

112.83 

22.65 

27.60 

4.70 

1.75 

1.00 

.50 

7.50 

1.90 

.99 

11.75 

7.50 

.50 

3,521.20 

3,093.75 
814,975.57 

50.45 



815,026.02 



815,026.02 



194v ANNUAL REPORTS. 



WATER WORKS EXTENSION. 

Credit. 

Balance from 1893 $ 14.94 

City of Boston, Water Rates, amount appropriated . 30,000.00 

Cash, received of City of Medford, 

pipe $ 50.65 

Town of Winchester, pipe . . 47.12 

Town of Lexington, pipe . . 2.76 

North Packing & Provision Co., 

pipe, fittings, and labor . . 1,382.93 

New England Dressed Meat -^ 

Wool Co., bend . . . 16.29 

Philadelphia, Reading & New 
England Railroad, iron pipe 
lost in transportation . . 348.24 

Sewers Construction account, iron 

pipe 9.40 1,857.39 



Debit. 

Cash, paid laborers . . . . S 5,387.90 

Davis & Farnum Manufacturing 

Co., castings . . . . 904.10 

Osgood & Hart, castings . . 1,160.36 

Somerville Iron Foundry, castings 985.95 

City of Boston, castings . . 18.25 

R. D. Wood & Co., iron pipe . 10,976.08 
Warren Foundry & Machine 

Company, iron pipe . . 3,012.19 
Boston Lead Manufacturing Co., 

lead 2,142.18 

Holyoke Hydrant «S: Iron works, 

hydrants . . . . 1,671.85 

Pratt & Cady Company, hydrants 1,182.00 

Peet Valve Company, gates . 1,432.00 



S31, 872.33 



Amounts carfied forward . . $28,872.86 $31,872.33 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S REPORT. I94w 

Amou7its brought forward . . 828,872.86 §31,872.33 
Chapman Valve Manufacturing 

Co., gates .... 160.10 

Fairbanks Co., valves . . . 19.20 
Walworth Manufacturing Co., 

boxes 32.85 

James Russell Boiler Works, labor 

on boiler .... 39.43 

Leach & Grant, bricks . . 23.81 

Perrin, Seamans & Co., packing . 15.34 
Frank E. Fitts Manufacturing 

Co., jute .... 12.25 

Thomas Walsh, teaming . . 24.00 

George F. McKenna, teaming . 20.00 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 866.37 

Fulton O'Brion, grain . . 31.88 

G. F. & S. E. Sturtevant, grain . 40.62 

George H. Sampson, powder . 11.95 

Highways Account, paving blocks 62.40 

$30,233.06 

Balance to credit in account 1895 1,639.27 

831,872.33 



194x 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE D. 



BALANCES DECEMBER 31, 1894. 



Cash . . ... 

Overlay and Abatement 

Public Property 

Real Estate Liens 

Sewer Assessments 

Sidewalk Assessments 

State of Massachusetts, Burial of 

Indigent Soldiers and Sailors . 
State of Massachusetts, Indigent 

Soldiers and Sailors 
State of Massachusetts, State Aid 
Taxes ..... 
Water Service Assessments . 
Excess and Deficiency 
Fire Department, Central Fire Station 
Fire Department, Central Fire Station, 

Electrical Apparatus and Furniture 
Fire Department, Chemical Engine 

and Equipment 
Fire Department, Hook and Ladder 

Station ..... 
Fire Department, Hook and Ladder 

Station, Equipment and Furniture 
Funded Debt .... 
Highways, City Stable 
Overplus on Tax Sales 
Property and Debt Balance 
Public Library .... 
Public Library Improvement 
Reduction of Funded Debt 
Schoolhouse, Edgerly Addition . 
Schoolhouse, English High 



37,713.22 

4,073.85 

2,195,271.64 

964.70 

10,353.10 

4,989.79 

157.50 



282.00 






7,312.00 






226,708.28 






84.40 








$ 


2,096.56 
3,713.57 

3,143.68 

501.47 



767.52 

31.00 

1,344,500.00 

4,148.12 

102.13 

850,771.64 

9.55 

3,00X00 

9,256. 7 

6rj.4S 

37,296.67 



Amounts canied forward 



$2,487,910.48 $2,259,958.26 



APPENDIX TO TREASURER AND COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



194y 



I 



Amounts bi'ought forward . 
Schoolhouse, High and English High, 

Heating, Ventilating and Plumbing 
Schoolhouse, O. S. Knapp Addition . 
Schoolhouse, Ward Four, South Side 

F. R. R. 
Sewers, Construction . 
Sundry Persons . 
Temporary Loans 
Water Maintenance . 
Water Works Extension 



S2,487,910.48 $2,259,058.26 

7,202.72 
2,876.54 

54.51 

7,978.07 

1,890.10 

206,000.00 

311.01 

1,639.27 



$2,487,910.48 $2,487,910.48 



REPORT 



OF THL 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



<13) 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to the Committee on Printing, to be printed in the annual reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINXENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to the Committee on Printing, to be printed in the annual reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



School Committee Rooms, Somerville, 
December 31, 1894. 

To the City Council of Somerville : — 

In accordance with the provisions of the Public Statutes, the School Committee 
respectfully submit the following report prepared by the Superintendent of Schools, 
which, in their opinion, embodies a correct statement of the condition and needs of 
the schools of the city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GORDON A. SOUTHWORTH, Secretary. 



\ 




CITIZENS FOR WHOM SOMERVILLE SCHOOLS ARE NAMED, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1894. 



Hon. WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 
FRANK \V. KAAN, President of the Common Council, ex officio. 



S. NEWTON CUTLER, 
GEORGE S. POOLE, 
SANFORD HANSCOM, 



MEMBERS. 



WARD ONE. 



Term expires 

28 Flint street . January, 1895 
46 Mt. Vernon street " 1896 
1 Webster street . '' 1897 



WARD TWO. 



ALVAH B. DEARBORN, 
HERBERT A. CHAPIN, 
THOMAS M. DURELL, 



34 Bow street 
41 Walnut street 
23 Bow street 



January, 1895 
1896 
1897 



WARD THREE. 



NORMAN W. BINGHAM, 235 School street 

QUINCY E. DICKERMAN, 85 Central street 
THOMAS S. WENTWORTH, 350 Broadway 



January, 1895 
1896 
1897 



WARD FOUR. 



BENJAMIN G. BROWN, 
GILES W. BRYANT, 
MARTIN W. CARR, 



38 Professors' row. January, 1895 
296 Elm street . • '' 1896 
74 Craigie street . '' 1897 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1895. 



Hon. WILLIAM II. HODGKINS, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 

L. HERBERT HUNTLEY, President of the Common Council, 
ex officio. 



GEORGE S. POOLE, 
SANFORD HANSCOM, 
S. NEWTON CUTLER, 



MEMBERS. 

WARD ONE. 

Term expires 

46 Mt. Vernon street, January, 1896 
1 Webster street . " 1897 

28 Flint street . *' 1898 



WARD TWO. 

HERBERT A. CHAPIN, 41 Walnut street . 

THOMAS M. DURELL, 23 Bow street 

ALVAH B. DEARBORN, 34 Bow street 

WARD THREE. 

QUINCY E. DICKERMAN, 85 Central street . 
THOMAS S. WENTWORTH, 350 Broadway 
FRANK H. HARBISON, 192 Central street . 



Januar}^, 1896 
1897 
1898 



January, 1896 
1897 
1898 



GILES W. BRYANT, 
MARTIN W. CARR, 
GEORGE A. MILES, 



WARD FOUR. 

296 Elm street . January, 1896 
74 Craigie street . '' 1897 

417 Highland avenue '' 1898 



The Board holds its regular meetings on the last Monday evening 
of each month, at 8 o'clock. 



GORDON A. SOUTHWORTH, 

Sec7'etaj'y and Superintende?it of Schools. 
40 Greenville street. Office, English High School building. 



STANDING COMMITTEES, 1895. 



English High School. — Messrs. Carr, Hanscom, Chapin, Dickerman, 

Poole. 
Latin High School. — Messrs. Dearborn, Cutler, Bryant, Hardison, 

Durell. 
East Somerville DiSTRicr. — Messrs. Hanscom, Cutler, Poole, Huntley. 
Prospect Hill District. — Messrs. Durell, Dearborn, Chapin. 

Winter Hill District. — Messrs. Wentworth, Hardison, Hodgkins, 

Dickerman. 
Spring Hill District. — Messrs. Carr, Bryant, Miles. 
West Somerville District. — Messrs. Bryant, Miles, Carr. 
Rules and Regulations. — Messrs. Chapin, Dickerman, Cutler. 
Finance. — Messrs. Poole, Carr, Huntley. 

Additional School Accommodations. — Messrs. Hodgkins, Hanscom, 
Durell, Wentworth, Bryant. 

Repairs. — Messrs. Wentworth, Chapin, Poole, Carr, Dearborn. 

Supplies. — Messrs. Bryant, Hardison, Durell, Poole. 

Text-Books. — Messrs. Durell, Dickerman, Hanscom, Bryant, Went- 
worth, Chapin, Cutler. 

Industrial Education. — Messrs. Dickerman, Cutler, Chapin, Dearborn, 

Carr. 
Music. — Messrs. Hanscom, Dearborn, Wentworth, Miles. 
Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Dickerman, Miles, Hardison. 
Salaries. — IMessrs. Cutler, Durell, Bryant, W^entworth. 
Evening Schools. — Messrs. Bryant, Dearborn, Hanscom, Dickerman. 
Private Schools. — Messrs. Dearborn, Poole, Miles, Wentworth. 



EXAMINATION COMMITTEES. 

Ninth Class. — Messrs. Poole, Miles. 
Eighth Class. — ^vlessrs. Chapin, Dickerman. 
Seventh Class. — Messrs. Dearborn, Bryant. 
Sixth Class. — Messrs. Hardison, Miles. 
Fifth Class. — Messrs. Carr, Hanscom. 
Fourth Class. — Messrs. Cutler, Wentworth. 



CONTENTS OF REPORT. 



I. 


Summary of Statistics and Increase in School 


PAGE. 




Accommodations in 1894 ..... 


10-12 


2. 


Additional school accommodations needed 


13-16 


3- 


Attendance 


16, 17 


4- 


Transfers of pupils 


. 


17, 18 


5- 


Admission of children in April 




18, 19 


6. 


Teachers ..... 




19, 20 


7- 


Substitutes 


. 


20, 21 


8. 


The High School .... 


/ 


21, 22 


9- 


English High School 




22-25 


10. 


Manual training .... 




25-27 


II. 


Hygienic conditions 


. 


27-30 


12. 


Evening schools .... 




30-32 


13- 


Course of study .... 




32-34 


14. 


School supplies 


. 


34, 35 


15- 


Work of special teachers 


. 


35. 36 


16. 


Grading ...... 




36-40 


17. 


In conclusion .... 




40, 41 


18. 


Appendix .... 


. 


• 43-101 


19. 


Biographical sketches of Citizens of Somerville, after 






whom schools have been named 


. 


. 102-110 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



FOR 



1894. 



To THE Board of School CoM>n'iTEE : — 

The twenty-third annual report of the Superintendent of Schools 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1804, is respectfully submitted, being the 
second of the present incumbent of the ofifice and the fifty-second of 
the school department of the municipality. 

It is an easy matter to sit down at the close of the year and esti- 
mate the profits of a manufactory with a seven hundred thousand 
dollar plant, in which, aided by the best modern appliances, two 
hundred skilled workmen have been diligently engaged during the 
twelve months in changing the crude material into the delicate fabric. 
The value of the output as well as the cost of production is known, and 
a balance may be easily struck. It is quite another task, however, to 
calculate the gain or loss when, instead of silk and cotton and steel, 
mind and heart and life are wrought upon ; when, instead of muscle 
and steam and wheel and lever, the power exerted is that of intellect 
and character alone, and when instead of a perishable product there 
is one endless in its duration and limitless in its possibilities. 

It is the province of a school report to deal mainly with one side 
of the educational account, presenting the character and cost of the 
work, showing the way in which the generous appropriations of the 
city have been spent, exhibiting the material facts that may be 
measured and seen, but leaving the question of the actual outcome 
and profit of it all to be answered by the future. 

Attention is called at the outset to the Tables in the Appendix. 
They have been compiled and arranged with care and contain much 
valuable information concerning the schools. They cover a series of 
years, and are of historical value. 



204 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



I. SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR 

1. Estimated population of Somerville 

2. School population, May 1 
o. Children attending school in December 

4. Attending private schools " " 

5. Attending public schools '' " 

6. Attending High School " " 

7. Attending grammar and primary schools in 

December 

8. Entire enrollment for year 

9. Average number belonging 

10. Average number attending 

11. Per cent of daily attendance 

12. Number of school buildings 

13. Valuation of school property 

14. Number of schoolrooms, without High School 

15. Number of teachers in December 

16. Salaries of teachers for 1894 

17. Salaries of officers 

18. Cost of books and supplies 

19. Cost of water and light 

20. Cost of janitors' services 

21. Cost of fuel . 

22. Total cost of day and evening schools 

23. Cost for each pupil in average membership 

24. Cost for each High School pupil 

25. Cost for each grammar and primary pupil 

26. Amount paid for new school buildings 

27. Cost of repairs for year (including heating 

apparatus of High School) 

28. Entire sum expended for all school purposes 

in 1894 .... 

29. Expended by School Board 

30. Expended by City Government 

31. Valuation of city 

32. Per cent of valuation spent to maintain schools 

33. Per cent of valuation spent for all school pur- 

poses ....... 



1894. 

51,510 

8,040 
8,978 
1,329 
7,649 
662 

6,987 

9,387 

7,212 

6,840 

94.84 

23 

$673,200.00 

155 

186 

$128,769.39 

$4,150.00 

$10,918.81 

$957.67 

$10,686.13 

$9,672.73 

$165,154.73 

$22.90 

$31.34 

$22.12 

$82,205.76 

$44,763.69 

$292,124.18 

$144,795.87 

$147,328.31 

$44,192,900.00 

0.374 

0.661 



dncc 




OREN S. KNAPP SCHOOL. 




Loring- &-= PhiJ>ps, 



Aj-chiiecis. 



OREN S. KNAPP SCHOOL. 



school department. 205 

Increase of 1894. 

Notwithstanding a year of widespread business depression, the city 
has maintained the average rate of growth of the last five years. As 
shown alike by the school census and the school registration, the gain 
has been about 450 children of school age, enough to fill ten new 
schoolrooms. We may expect this rate of increase to continue for 
several years. Will it not be wise to recognize and provide for it? 

During the 23 years since its incorporation the population 
of the city has trebled. This rapid growth has compelled large 
expenditures for public improvements, chief among which is that for 
schools. With the completion of the English High Schoolhouse the 
city will have expended since 1872 for new school buildings alone, the 
sum of $660,000, an average annual outlay of over 828,000. But our 
educational interests are vital. The demands of the schools are 
imperative, and who shall say that the prosperity of the city is not 
directly traceable to its generosity in this direction? 

To have anticipated this growth and provided school accommoda- 
tions accordingly would have been impossible. Within five years five 
of our school buildings — the Morse, Highland, Edgerly, Bingham, 
and Knapp — have been enlarged. To have built them of their 
present size at the outset would have seemed the height of presump- 
tion, and yet the sequel shows that this would have been wise 
economy, for the architectural difiiculties of unanticipated enlarge- 
ments have entailed an increased expenditure that would more than 
have paid the interest on the investment required for the larger 
buildings. Does not this experience teach us that it will conserve the 
financial as well as the educational interests of the city if our new 
schoolhouses are made large enough not only for present wants, but 
also for the inevitable needs of the immediate future ? At least, should 
they not be planned so that additions can be made without either 
wasteful expense or architectural disfigurement? 

Twelve new schoolrooms have been provided during the year, but 
as four of these were rendered imperative by the destruction of the 
Webster Schoolhouse, we can claim a net gain of but eight. 

The capacity of the Bingham Schoolhouse has been doubled by 
the addition of four rooms in exact duplication of the original build- 
ing. The enlargement was begun in October, 1893, and completed in 
March, 1894, at a cost of ^14,916.87. The cost of the original build- 
ing in 1887, exclusive of the land, was $13,224.36. 



20(3 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The new rooms were at once filled, greatly to the relief of the 
Forster School. Already it is apparent that the perfectly feasible 
addition of six rooms would have been much wiser. The building 
will be overcrowded in April, with no means of relief at hand. 

A new building at the corner of Beacon and Kent streets was 
begun in March of the current year and completed in season for the 
opening of the schools in September. It is a plain but substantial 
brick structure, thoroughly built, heated by steam, perfectly ventilated, 
and containing four well-lighted classrooms with adjustable furniture 
and all needed appliances. 

The entire cost to the city has been : 

For 13,883 sq. ft. of land $ 3,193.09 

For the building, furniture, etc. .... 16,190.10 



Total $19,383.19 

An elevation and plan of the building are herewith presented. 

At the request of the School Board, the City Council named the new 
school the George W. Durell School, in honor of an esteemed citizen 
for eleven years a member of the committee, and long identified with 
the ethical and educational interests of our city, one whose life and 
character furnish an inspiration and an example for the youth who 
shall in coming years share the advantages of the school bearing his 
name. 

The enlargement of the Knapp School was begun in June and 
completed in December, at a cost of about $15,000. It consists of a 
building corresponding in its architecture to the original structure, 
containing four schoolrooms, a ward-room, principal's office, and 
teachers' room, and connected with the main building by ample corri- 
dors. It is heated by steam, ventilated by modern methods, and 
supplied with adjustable furniture, slate blackboards, and separate 
entrances. A second floor plan of the whole building is herewith 
presented. 




GEORGE W. DURELL SCHOOL. 







^ 



1^1 



I 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENI. 20' 



II. ADDITIONAL SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

In the school report of last year certain governing principles were 
presented which should be borne in mind in planning and providing 
additional school accommodations. They will be recalled if they are 
only mentioned at this time. 

The first has already been considered. We should plan not simply 
to see how present exigencies may be tided over in the easiest way, 
but with a view to providing most wisely for the next five years and 
their inevitable increase of two thousand children. 

We should strive, secondly, to secure the gradual reduction of 
pupils in a room to a teachable limit of forty or forty-five, not merely 
in what are evidently congested localities, but throughout the city. 
This will obviate the deplorable necessity of employing two persons 
to instruct a single class. 

Thirdly, it should be our aim steadily to lessen the number of 
primary pupils in the twelve-room buildings, and to make them dis- 
tinctively grammar schools. This means the construction of more 
four-room buildings for primary purposes, where they can be easily 
reached by little children. 

In the fourth place, we should avoid erecting any more eight-room 
buildings, because they are ill adapted to our wants and system of 
grading. 

Fifthly, we should recognize the fact that the Kindergarten is now 
an integral part of every complete school system, and we should pro- 
vide for the early establishment of at least eight in various parts of 
the city. 

And, lastly, we should plan to abandon as soon as possible those 
relics of an earlier age, the Harvard, Cedar-street, and Beech-street 
Schoolhouses. If circumstances had forced their use by residents of 
the hilltops, they would have been indignantly vacated years ago. 
But do not children of the poor, whose school life is necessarily short, 



208 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

have an equal if not a stronger claim on us for the best our schools 
afford? Let tardy justice, then, be done them by the speedy replace- 
ment of these ancient landmarks by better buildings. 

What additional school accommodations are needed at the present 
time ? 

1. The most pressing need is at West Somerville. The increase 
of school population has been twice as great during the year in this 
section as in any other. The three schools west of Cedar street are 
so crowded as to impair their efificiency. Seven new rooms could be 
occupied in April if they were ready. To relieve the situation, last 
year the enlargement of the Burns Schoolhouse was recommended. 
This may ultimately need to be done, but at the present time the de- 
mand is for room farther to the west. Another grammar school centre 
is needed at West Somerville, and should be established as soon as pos- 
sible in a twelve-room building, located, perhaps, on Holland street, 
opposite Jay street. A building of this size will anticipate the needs 
of the next two years, and in the location suggested will well accom- 
modate all children living north of the railroad, and on Elm street 
and west thereof. The remainder of the district as far east as 
Cedar street would be tributary to the Highland School. 

2. The need of more room at East Somerville was vainly urged 
last year. Sixty children, the offspring of .patient and uncomplaining 
but expectant parents, were on half-time from i\pril to July. This 
experience will be repeated in '95, and three extra teachers will be 
required. I renew the suggestion for a building of four or six rooms 
on the lot adjoining the Prescott School on Myrtle street. The loca- 
tion is central and would afford relief to the Edgerly and Davis as well 
as the Prescott. It could be heated by the Prescott apparatus, while 
the present yard-room and sanitary arrangements would be ample for 
both buildings. 

3. Some additional provision must be made for the primary chil- 
dren in the Morse district, 40 of whom were on half-time last spring. 
The Beech-street building, even if it could accommodate them, has 
been rendered still more unfit for school purposes by the erection of 
a house within ten feet of its easterly side, which shuts out both sunshine 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 209 

and light. A four-room building on its site would not only relieve the 
Morse, and respectably house the Beech-street children, but it would 
take one of the classes from the already overcrowded Durell School. 
A twelve-room building, either here or on the Franklin lot, would 
accomplish the same results, and much more that is dseirable* 
Farther consideration may prove this to be the best form of relief. 

4. A four-room building is much needed on Hudson street near 
Lowell street. Primary children in this vicinity now go a long distance 
to the Forster, or else to the Morse or the Burns. A building here 
would relieve these schools. Forty-five per cent of the children in 
the Forster are now in primary grades. Some of them must be 
removed to make room for grammar classes from the Glines and 
Bingham. The proposed new building would aid in this direction as 
well as meet the wants of a rapidly-growing section. 

5. It was confidently expected that the opening of the new build- 
ing on Kent street would enable us to dispense with the Harvard 
Schoolhouse, but we were disappointed, and it is still in use. This 
old wooden building has served town and city for 43 years. Originally 
built on Cherry street, near Elm, to accommodate the L. V. Bell 
Primary School in 1851, then removed in 1867 to the rear of the 
Franklin to take its overflow, it finally replaced an equally ancient and 
valuable structure on its present site in 1871. It has been used alto- 
gether too long, and should be abandoned, not only in the interests of 
the children condemned to occupy it, but also for the credit of our 
fair city. A schoolhouse, however, is needed in this locality. A four- 
room building on Washington street, near Calvin, would house the 
Harvard children and relieve the Knapp School, sure to be over- 
burdened in the spring, and the already crowded Durell. It would 
be filled in less than two years. 

6. Two other four-room buildings will be needed before they are 
completed. One should be located on Walnut street near the head of 
Sunnyside avenue, to relieve the Glines and the Edgerly. The other 
should be on or near the northeast corner of the city farm, to accom- 
modate the overflow of the Bingham and to extinguish the Cedar-street 
School. 



210 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

I am aware that these demands may seem rather formidable, but 
they are presented in the order of their urgency, and in accordance 
with principles previously enunciated. They cover the immediate 
future as well as the present ; they look to a lessening of the number of 
pupils now assigned to a single teacher ; they provide room for the 
establishment of Kindergartens ; they locate primary schools within 
easy reach of their occupants, and tend towards filling the large build- 
ings with exclusively grammar grades ; and they close buildings belong- 
ing to the Silurian age of education. 

III. ATTENDANCE. 

The work of the schools has progressed through the year without 
interruptions or distractions. The theoretical school-year of 400 half 
days has been shortened one tenth by omissions of the regular sessions. 
Of the 39 half days lost, twenty-two are chargeable to holidays, nine to 
stormy weather, two to a teachers' convention, one to the High School 
exhibition, and five to the custom of closing in the middle instead of at 
the end of the last week of the school year. 

It is gratifying to observe that in regularity of attendance the 
record of the year is the highest in the history of Somerville, the rate 
being 94.8 per cent of the average membership. As compared with 
last year, tardiness has decreased 11 per cent, dismissals 12 per 
cent, and truancy 45 per cent. This somewhat remarkable result is 
attributabel to the vigilance and influence of teachers, the ambition of 
children, and the co-operation of parents. Another notable fact which 
shows the undoubted growth of moral power among the teachers, is the 
decrease of nearly 50 per cent in cases where it has been found neces- 
sary to administer corporal punishment. More than one half of all the 
occasions requiring the use of force arise in the fourth, fifth, and sixth 
grades. Are children in these classes more difficult to control or less 
amenable to moral influences than others, or is the disproportion 
traceable to elements of weakness in the teaching force? 

The custom of removing children from school during the month 
of June is to be deprecated. In this way classes ar esometimes well- 
nigh broken up during the last few days or weeks of the school year. 
Some of the most important of all the work should be done at this 
season. Equally erroneous is the supposition that no loss results from 



SCHOOL DEPARTMEXT. 211 

a few days' absence in September. The schools are all equipped with 
needed supplies at the time of opening, and may get under way with 
their regular programme at once, and every child should be present 
to share in the advantage. The delay in the organizing of some 
schools will this year be obviated by making all promotions and 
arranging new classes in June instead of September. This will enable 
even special teachers to begin operations on the first day of the term. 
Tables 9 to 15 will show facts of attendance in detail. 



IV. TRANSFER OF PUPILS. 

Two things render necessary the frequent transfer of children from 
one school to another : first, a lack of room in one building and a 
supply in another ; secondly, the demands of classification and the 
equalization of work among teachers. Hence it is not possible to 
establish unchangeable lines between the schools of a district, nor 
is it essential. Our school buildings are so near together that the 
element of distance cannot affect the question. The instruction and 
facilities for learning are equally good in all the schools. The course 
of study, rate of progress, and basis of promotion are the same. 
Nevertheless, objections on the part of both children and parents are 
often encountered. They are generally based on sentiment, or on 
prejudice for one school or teacher, or against another, or possibly on 
fear of a descent in the social scale. In this matter, as in all others 
pertaining to our schools, the greatest good of the greatest number 
must control. It must be assumed as a matter of course, that any 
child may be called upon to attend school this year in one building 
and next year in another. These transfers, however, are not to be 
made arbitrarily or with unjust discrimination, but in accordance 
with the following rule : The pupils transferred shall be those living 
nearest the school to which the transfer is to be made, the shortest 
sidewalk distance being considered. 

Nor should the lines between districts be inflexible or impassable. 
There is no reason why some one who knows the whole situation 
should not have authorit}^ to transfer children across district lines 
whenever individual or school interests can be thereby promoted. 
For example : At any time in the school year 1893-94, the Pope 
School could have relieved the Davis of children enough to save the 

(14) 



212 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

services and salary ($425) of an assistant. And at the Cummings 
there has been no time during the past year when 25 children from 
the Forster or the Morse could not have been accommodated in the 
second and third grades. The same may be true at any time of the 
Edgerly and Glines, or of other districts. If we could re-locate our 
school buildings, transfers might be needless, but under existing 
arrangements they should be both authorized and expected. 

V. ADMISSION OF CHILDREN. 

Under the present rules children are admitted to the first grade 
in September and April. In 1894 there were admitted in 

September, 626, of the average age of 5 years, 7.3 months. 
April, 372, '' " '' '' " 5 " 7.3 " 

Practically no children are admitted during the rest of the year. 
It will be noticed that there is no difference in the average age of the 
two classes. 

The admission of 400 children in April greatly disturbs the organ- 
ization of the lower grades and impairs their efficiency. At the present 
time the average membership of the 25 first grades is 53. If more 
are admitted they must be crowded into rooms already filled, extra 
seats provided, some children improperly forced into higher grades, 
and many of them put on half-time. Additional teachers must be 
provided. Little children need the constant attention of a teacher 
during the first two or three months of their school life. Our schools 
present no more arduous task than that of the teacher of a first grade 
with 50 or more children, the majority of whom are in school for the 
first time. Certainly if assistants are ever needed it is in such schools. 
No April children are promoted to the next grade in June. They 
have accomplished but little. The teachers very properly feel obliged 
to spend their time and energies on the majority who must be made 
ready for promotion. 

In view of all these disadvantages it becomes a serious question 
whether it is expedient to admit any children in April. If it were 
understood that this would not be done, instead of being held back, 
most of them would be entered in September, thus permitting an 
organization of the classes that would remain unchanged during the 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 213 

year, and result in a practical gain of time for the child. If this 
should not be decided upon, the period of admission should be 
shortened to cover the first week of the month. 

Table 15 will show the number admitted from each school in 
April and September, and the number on half-time. 

VI. TEACHERS. 

There are now 1^^9 teachers in the employ of the city, three of whom 
are assistants in training without pay. During the year 19 teachers 
have resigned, one of whom had taught successfully in our schools 25 
years, another 17 years, a third 10 years, while the average term of 
service of the remaining 16 covered a period of less than three years. 
Of the 19, seven were attracted by more lucrative positions elsewhere, 
four resigned on account of ill health, three to take advanced courses 
of study, and five retired to engage in other pursuits. 

In 1894,26 new teachers were elected, of whom six are collegiates, 
nine graduates of normal schools, and five of training schools. Great 
pains have been taken in their selection and it is believed that they will 
prove valuable additions to our teaching force. 

How to secure and retain the best teachers is the perpetual and 
perplexing problem upon whose solution depends the success of all 
our efforts in education. The teacher is the heart and soul of the 
school. Upon her depend its life and power. In exact proportion 
as the teacher lacks high moral character, the power of personal 
influence, refined taste and manners, good scholarship, and thorough 
professional training, the school fails to accomplish its purpose. 
Given these qualities and the highest success is certain, irrespective of 
material surroundings. We can get along with poor or crowded 
buildings, with meagre or ill-adapted appliances, with enriched or 
impoverished courses of study, but good teachers are indispensable. 

It is perhaps too much to expect that every one of a large corps 
of teachers should fulfil the ideal requirements. Some have the 
future, others only the present in mind ; some teach children, others 
nothing but subjects ; some control the motives of conduct, others 
simply enforce orders ; some develop all the faculties symmetrically, 
others train one, if any ; some are full of love and sympathy and help- 
fulness for the slow, the weak, the unfortunate, others are self-centred ; 



214 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

some teach pedagogically, others keep school ; some grow, others 
fossihze ; some are original, enthusiastic, inspiring, others follow 
mechanically a dull routine ; some love their work and put heart and 
conscience and soul into it, others are satisfied with the maximum 
salary. 

As for our own teachers, the great majority, if not all, are faithful, 
conscientious, and devoted to the highest interests of those they teach. 
They do their best within their limitations. They deserve, as they 
receive, the generous sympathy, co-operation, and esteem of their con- 
stituencies and the support and gratitude of the city whose bulwarks 
they guard, and whose future is almost entirely within their control. 

Tables 22 to 28 in the Appendix show the number of teachers, 
lesignations, elections, transfers, etc., for the year. 

VII. SUBSTITUTES. 

During the year there have been 281 occasions for the employ- 
ment of substitutes, who have served a total of 1,-155 half-days, and 
have received the sum of $2,374.96. 

There is no more fruitful source of interruption to school work 
than the unexpected absence of regular teachers, more or less of 
which is unavoidable under the most favorable circumstances. How 
to render these absences least disastrous to the progress of the schools 
is an important question. The position of a substitute is extremely 
embarrassing. Suddenly called to take charge of 50 children, not 
one of whom she knows, entirely ignorant of the work and attainments 
of the class, without opportunity to make any preparation whatever 
for the day's instruction, not strong to discipline or ready in emer- 
gencies, is it strange that an ordinary substitute accomplishes little 
more than to keep the children out of the street, and that the class 
rapidly retrogrades? It would certainly be economy from an educa- 
tional point of view, and involve but slight increase of expenditure, if 
anv, to employ two or three thoroughly competent teachers to act as 
substitutes whenever and wherever their services may be needed. 
They should be perfectly familiar with the work of all the grades and 
conversant with all the schools and their methods. When not em- 
ployed in substituting they could render valuable service in large 
classes or along special lines of instruction. The salary paid should 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 215 

be sufficient to attract and retain extraordinary teachers possessing 
the peculiar qualifications required for such work. We cannot afford 
to employ apprentices where master-workmen are needed. 

VIII. THE HIGH [SCHOOL. 

With the close of the current school year, the institution that has 
been so long and favorably known as the '-Somerville High School" will 
change its character and will be thenceforward known as the " Somer- 
ville Latin School." A glance, therefore, at its honorable history will 
not be uninteresting. 

The school wfis organized May 3, 1852. It has therefore been in 
existence nearly 43 years. For the first 15 years it occupied the upper 
story of what is now the City Hall. For the next five years the entire 
building was devoted to its use. Since 1872 it has occupied the 
present building. 

The average membership of the school for the first 15 years 
was 76, that being the exact number with which it started in 1852. 
In 18G7, however, Mr. Baxter, the present Principal, took charge of 
the school with a membership of 110. Since then the number of 
members has steadily increased, practically doubling every 10 years, 
and reaching the maximum of 691 in the fall of 1894. 

The first class was graduated in 1862, and contained six members. 
The thirty-third class was graduated in June, 1894. It contained 111 
members. 

Since its organization 4,322 persons have been members of the 
school, 1,255, or nearly 30 per cent, of whom have received diplomas 
of graduation. 

Ten years ago the school had outgrown its present quarters. Since 
then it has been obliged to adapt itself to accommodations that have 
become more and more inadequate each year. The division of the 
school into sections and the adoption of the plan of two sessions 
have prevented the situation from becoming intolerable. This has 
entailed upon Principal and teachers increased labor and responsi- 
bility, which have been met without complaint. The lack of recitation 
rooms has compelled an average assignment of over 45 pupils to a 
teacher. 

But notwithstandinsj all these embarrassments the school has 



216 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

grown steadily in numbers, in popularity, and in efficiency. Too 
much credit cannot be given to the Principal and his assistants for 
their patience, fidelity, and success in the face of all the untoward cir- 
cumstances of the last few years. Not only they, but the members of 
the school and our citizens generally, are to be congratulated on the 
prospect of rehef so near at hand in the completion of the English 
High School building. 

Table 21 shows not only the membership of the school and the 
number of graduates since 1867, but also the steady gain in its mem- 
bership as compared with the whole number of pupils in the city, and 
the increase in the number of graduates as compared with the member- 
ship of the school. , 

Table 29 gives the names of teachers since the organization, with 
length of service. 

IX. ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL. 

Ground was broken for the English High School building, Decem- 
ber 5, 1893. The work has progressed with slight interruptions during 
the year, and will doubtless be completed in ample season for the 
opening of the school in September, 1895. 

The work of organizing the new school and reorganizing the 
old, defining the distinctive and mutual relations between them, estab- 
lishing the various courses of study, selecting teachers and equipping 
the schools with the best appliances — text-books, reference libraries, 
laboratory furnishings, etc. — is the most important task before the 
School Board of 1895. 

The two High School buildings supply accommodations for a thou- 
sand pupils and should be adequate for our uses for at least ten years. 
The schools organized on the proper basis, should furnish whatever 
education below the college or scientific school any resident of Somer- 
ville may desire or justly claim from the city. It is not the province 
of public schools to educate or train specialists in any line, — music, 
elocution, art, science, professional or commercial life. They have 
done all that can be rightly demanded of them when they have fur- 
nished facilities for a general education that shall reasonably fit its 
possessor for life and its duties in the home, in society, in the State. 

The legitimate work of the schools includes training for higher 
institutions of learning, — colleges and scientific schools, — but this 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 217 

should be subordinated to more important and more comprehensive 
ends and aims. The character of a pubUc school system should be con- 
trolled by the interests of the ninety-nine whose educational life ends 
within it, rather than by the needs of the one whose education is com- 
pleted beyond it. Too largely have the character and work of the high 
school been dominated by the demands of the college. Too largely 
even now is the college seeking to determine the scope and nature, not 
only of secondary but of elementary education as well. 

While opening its doors to all, and offering courses of study, gen- 
eral as well as specific, the ordinary high school, conscious that the 
criterion of judgment will be the number of admissions to college and 
the future standing of its students therein, regulates its work to a great 
extent by college requirements, and gives to candidates for higher 
education the best and most of what it has to offer. Henceforth, in 
Somerville at least, this is not to be the case. The Latin School is to 
be distinctively the preparatory or fitting school for all higher institu- 
tions of learning. Herein colleges and scientific schools will dictate 
the courses. 

The English High School, however, will be free from this domina- 
tion. It will meet the broadest needs of those whose education ends 
in the public schools. It will recognize the claims of those who are 
to be artisans or traders as equal to the claims of those who are to 
enter the professions. It will doubtless teach Latin, as furnishing un- 
derlying elements for the study of English, and to give students who 
change their plans with reference to college after a year or two, an 
opportunity to enter the Latin School without loss of time. It will 
teach the modern languages, of course, but its chief work will be, as 
its name indicates, instruction in English, — in literature with its wealth 
of knowledge and beauty, in the use of the mother tongue with its rich- 
ness and power for the expression of thought, in history with its revela- 
tions of the growth and progress of civilization, in science with its 
marvellous disclosures of the secrets of nature, in mathematics with its 
stern training of the reason, in commercial and business affairs with 
their relations to life, in government and political economy with their 
lessons of the duties of citizenship, in art and in music with their refin- 
ing influences, in whatever knowledge those may desire whose educa- 
tional life ends within its walls. The teaching will be such as to 
strengthen and quicken the faculties, to cultivate individualism and 



218 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

self-dependence, to awaken a craving for more and better, and all its 
influences such as to make the future of the graduates intelligent, un- 
selfish, useful, happy. 

A single course of study should emphasize and require a few things 
that are fundamental, but it should offer a wide range of elective studies 
to meet the varying tastes and necessities of all sorts of students. 
Diplomas should be awarded for the amount and quality of work done 
rather than for the completion of courses along prescribed lines, thus 
permitting the widest freedom of choice. x\ll possible inducements 
should be offered for the completion of a four years' course, but no 
one should be debarred from taking any portion of it because restrict- 
ing circumstances forbid more. What is done, however, should be 
thoroughly done, for clear and definite ideas within narrow limits are 
better than confusion and indefiniteness in a larger field. The sciences 
should have a prominent place, for facilities for laboratory methods will 
be unsurpassed. Drawing, music, elocution, physical training, long 
excluded, or inadequately provided for by the necessities of the situa- 
tion, may now receive their due share of attention. 

Hundreds of young women are to graduate from the English High 
School with their education nominally completed. Whatever they may 
do immediately after graduation, each will eventually reach woman's 
normal position, and become the head of a household. What prac- 
tical knowledge and ability for the successful conduct of its affairs will 
her education have given her? What will she know of household 
management, of the art of cooking, of the chemistry of foods, of 
hygiene, of sanitary science, of what to do in emergencies, of home 
nursing and care of the sick, of household art and economy? Will 
not a course in domestic science, which shall give some practical 
knowledge along these lines, be a valuable feature of the new High 
School, doing for the girls what manual training does for the boys? 
Its aim and its methods should be educative throughout, the develop- 
ing of character, of mental ability, of moral stamina, by the training 
furnished. Sach a course involves the fitting of a room in the new 
building adapted to these purposes. The expense would be inconsid- 
erable compared with the results. It would be available for the in- 
struction in cooking to the girls of the eighth and ninth grades of the 
grammar schools. The attention of the Board is especially called to 
this matter. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 219 

Attempts to be more specific with regard to the organization of the 
new school would be premature at this time. These suggestions 
of the possibihties of the school and its general scope are given to 
show the largeness and importance of the question before the 
Board. 

X. MANUAL TRAINING. 

In its modern educational use the expression manual tiaining im- 
plies instruction in any form of work with the hands that has for its 
primary object the improvement of the intellectual powers of the 
worker. Only incidentally does it lead to the acquisition of skill that 
may help in the pursuits of industrial life. 

Its earliest application to school life is found in the Kindergarten, 
the occupations of which are arranged for the systematic development of 
the child's powers through the exercise of his natural activities. The 
'' gifts " of the Kindergarten are designed to develop the child's ability 
to observe and classify the forms and appearances of objects, and aid 
his efforts to obtain knowledge of them. The "occupations" enable 
him to express his ideas of things, and to apply his knowledge to the 
accomplishment of some specific end. The advantages of this system 
of training for children between the ages of three and a half and five 
years are too well known to need presentation here. In all places 
where sound and progressive educational principles control, Kinder- 
gartens have become firmly established. 

They have been a feature of our school system for several years, 
although not recognized by the School Board as an integral part of 
it until the present year, when authority was granted to district 
committees to establish them with the approval of the Board. At 
the present time we have but one Kindergarten in operation, and 
that is in the Prospect Hill School. Its sessions are held from to 
12. It is well attended, and its value is generally recognized. The 
extension of this fundamental feature of our school system is delayed 
only by lack of room for the purpose. 

Some forms of manual training, such as drawing, paper cutting 
and folding, and clay modelling are taught in our primary grades. In 
the grammar grades all that is done in this line beyond the excellent 
work in drawing, is sewing by the girls of the fourth, fifth, sixth, and 
seventh grades, and special work in mechanical drawing by the boys of 



220 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

these grades. The value of instruction in the use of the knife and 
other tools in woodwork for boys of grammar grades is everywhere 
acknowledged. As soon as suitable accommodations can be furnished, 
it will undoubtedly be given to all boys of our eighth and ninth grades. 

The term inanual training, as used in connection with high school 
boys, has reference to work with tools upon wood, — simple forms of 
carpentry, carving, turning, pattern-making, and cabinetwork, — and 
also to work upon metals, — moulding, casting, forging, filing, turning, 
and other machine work. This work is always accompanied by draw- 
ing, working plans in all cases being first required. Manual training 
schools are in no sense trade schools. They are not designed to 
make boys carpenters or machinists. They give a knowledge, both 
theoretical and practical, of the chief fundamental operations cf all 
mechanical trades. The primary object and principal value are not 
economic but intellectual, not to give skill to the hand, but power to 
the faculties of the mind. Experience everywhere has proved their 
value in this direction. It also shows that time taken for manual 
training results in no loss of progress or attainment, but rather in dis- 
tinct advantage along the line of purely scholastic work. 

With this form of manual training nothing has thus far been done 
in Somerville. Not that we have been unwilling to admit its value, 
but so great have been the demands upon us for school accommoda- 
tions and for expenditures in other directions, that we have been obliged 
to forego it. We have, however, no longer any option in the matter, 
for, convinced of its advantages as an element of education, the Legis- 
lature of 1894 passed the following enactment : — 

After the first day of September in the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-five, every city of twenty thousand or more inhabitants shall 
maintain as part of its High School system the teaching of manual 
training. The course to be pursued in said instruction shall be sub- 
ject to the approval of the State Board of Education. 

This compels us to incorporate manual training as a part of our 
High School work. 

When the English Schoolhouse was planned, several rooms were 
set apart in the basement for this purpose. A complete outfit would 
require four rooms, one for carpentry, one for wood-turning and 
pattern-making, a forging room, and a room for metal working. Only 
the first two of these are adapted to our building. To equip a car- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 221 

penter shop with benches, tools, and lockers will cost 81,500. The 
second room, equipped with motor, lathes, benches, tools, and lockers 
will require an outlay of about S2,000. The annual salary of a com- 
petent instructor will be at least 81,000. These rooms would enable 
us to give all high school boys two lessons per week, and one lesson 
to boys in the ninth grade of the grammar schools. 

XI. HYGIENIC CONDITIONS. 

Whatever affects the health or physical development of school 
children is a matter of public concern, and it is incumbent upon those 
charged with the conduct of educational affairs to see that everything 
possible is done to promote health and vigor of body and mind. To 
this end the following things are essential : — 

Every school child should be supplied with ],<S00 cubic feet per 
hour of pure air of comfortable and equable temperature. 

He should have a chair and desk duly proportioned to his size, 
where he can sit without the distortion or discomfort of any portion 
of his body. 

He should be seated within at least 20 feet of a window, through 
which comes a plentiful supply of light from his left or from behind. 

The tedium and confinement of his school hours should be broken 
up by periods of relaxation, change, and muscular exercise, graduated 
in length and frequency according to his age. 

Reasonable opportunity should be given him to attend to his 
natural wants. 

As far as possible he should be protected from exposure in any 
way to contagious diseases. 

The work assigned him both in school and at home should be so 
%visely apportioned that undue application or nervous strain may be 
avoided on the one hand, and the influence of idle, listless, lazy habits 
on the other. 

To what extent are these hygienic conditions secured to Somerville 
children? 

As TO Fresh Air. 

Four fifths of them breathe comparatively pure air. The rest 
breathe in part the noxious exhalations of one another's lungs, air 
charged with all sorts of impurities. The six stove-heated buildings 



222 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

and the Bell Schoolhouse have no means of ventilation but the 
windows. The Prescott has a half-completed system of fresh-air 
supply. 

The High School, after twenty-two years of waiting, has been 
supplied with a complete and perfectly satisfactory system of heating" 
and ventilation, an adequate supply of fresh air being constantly 
forced into every part of the building by mechanical means, while an 
equable temperature is automatically maintained throughout the 
twenty-four hours. 

As TO Light. 

Many of our schoolrooms are insufficiently lighted. The window 
area of a schoolroom with ordinary exposure should be at least one 
sixth of the floor area. In the Beech-street building, for example, it 
is only one tenth, and in most of the older buildings it is far below the 
standard. In many rooms the strain on children's eyes on cloudy 
days is so severe, that considerate teachers dispense with eye-work. 
In this connection it may be remarked that blackboard writing and 
figures are often too fine and small to be easily read. Pupils are ex- 
pected to read them, whether large or small, at too acute an angle. The 
common habit of writing or ciphering with the neck twisted so that 
one eye is several inches nearer the work than the other is a fruitful 
source of optical weakness. Only teachers can correct these faults. 

As TO Seats. 

In many schoolrooms the chairs and desks are either too large or 
too small for their occupants. This is owing to differences in the size 
of children in the same class, to the use of the same room by different 
grades in successive years, or to the necessity of using the furniture on 
hand when changes or additions are required. 

The extreme difference in the height of grammar school children 
in the same class, will average about 13 inches, and of primary chil 
dren about 10 inches. Of course, where single-sized seats are provided,, 
as is generally the case, some children are forced to sit day after day 
in constrained and unnatural positions at the expense of both comfort 
and symmetrical development. Besides, the trouble is often aggra- 
vated by chair and desk being wrongly adjusted to each other. 

These serious evils are being lessened by the adoption of furniture 



SCHOOL DEPARTjNIENT. 223 

made on hygienic principles and easily adjusted to varying heights. 
The old iron standards now in use should be replaced by the adjust- 
able pattern, a change that would involve little expense and result in 
great gain. So long, however, as we are obliged to use the old- 
fashioned furniture it should be readjusted whenever necessary to 
adapt it to hygienic requirements. 

As TO Exercise. 

The recess midway of the session, as a period of out-door exercise 
and play, has been superseded by a brief '' basement recess" for 
primary grades, and ten minutes of gymnastic exercises for the others. 
The change results in a slight gain in time, a marked advantage in 
discipline, and no apparent loss of energy, or health, or interest. 

It must not be supposed that twenty minutes daily spent in gym- 
nastic exercises, however scientific or valuable in character,, can coun- 
teract or neutralize the evil effects of five hours of sitting in cramped 
and unhealthful positions in a vitiated and enervating atmosphere. It 
would be wiser to strike at the root of the trouble. Nevertheless, 
aside from their educative value, the gymnastic exercises serve for 
change and relaxation, and in the majority of cases have great value 
in promoting physical vigor. 

As to Contagion. 
The law regulating vaccination is strictly enforced. Parental 
objection is rarely met. Two or three cases have occurred, when in 
accordance with a recent amendment of the law, the certificate of a 
regular practising physician declaring the child an unfit subject for 
vaccination has been presented. Children from households in which 
any contagious disease exists, are rigidly excluded from school until 
all danger is passed. An exception is made by our rules in favor of 
children affected by whooping-cough. Would not the exclusion of 
such children, during certain stages of the disease, at least, be a gain 
to the srreatest number? It certainlv would relieve the schools from 
an annoyance that at times occasions serious interruption. 

The question has been raised whether the use of text-books and 
school material by all sorts of children in common, may not be a means 
of spreading contagion. If danger exists, no effort is spared to reduce 



244 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

it to a minimum. Books exposed to infection are burned. With the 
exception of books supplied in numbers sufficient for only a section of 
the class, every child uses the same books exclusively. All books are 
covered as often as need be, the expense being justifiable on the score 
of cleanliness and increased durability as well as for sanitary reasons. 
Paper is superseding the use of slates, being preferable in most grades 
for utility as well as cleanliness. 

Our schoolrooms are not cleaned as they ought to be. Floors, 
woodwork, desks, and chairs should be washed thoroughly every two 
months instead of every year. Whitewash, paint, and varnish should 
be freely used, and every possible precaution taken to secure cleanli- 
ness, and freedom from whatever may endanger health. 

As TO Overwork. 

Are children overworked in our schools? No. On the contrar}^ 
they are underworked both in school and out of it. Too much is 
done for them, too little by them. Closer application, greater self- 
activity and self-dependence, more sturdy wiestling with difficulties, 
and less coddling and vicarious effort on the part of the teacher are 
needed to produce strong, self-reliant students with power to think 
and to do. 

XII. EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The city is required by law to maintain "evening schools for the 
instruction of persons over 12 years of age in orthography, reading, 
writing, geography, arithmetic, drawing, the history of the United 
States, and good behavior." In compliance with this law, for several 
years three common evening schools have been opened in different 
parts of the city in the month of October, and continued for four 
evenings a week, closing about Christmas, after from 40 to 50 sessions. 
These schools generally open with good numbers, and a commendable 
degree of interest. Very soon, however, the interest diminishes, and 
one by one the attendants drop out until when the schools close but 
few remain. For the last five years the average attendance has been 
only two fifths of the enrollment. For 1894 it has been even less, the 
enrollment being 391, and the average attendance 86, or 22 per cent. 
The industrious few who attend regularly, make satisfactory, and in 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 225 

some cases, remarkable progress. The many, who either come very 
irregularly or else leave the school early in the season, profit little. 

These schools are expensive. When we consider that they are in 
session but a hundred' hours during the year, we find that the meagre 
acquirements of the evening school pupil cost the city annually 
about three times as much as it pays for the education of a pupil in 
the High School, and four times as much as it expends upon a child 
in the day schools of lower grade. So long as we are compelled to 
maintain these schools, in view of their cost ought they not to be 
made to yield a larger dividend ? 

There are many young men and women in our city whose edu- 
cational advantages have been limited. Scores of boys and girls leave 
our schools every year just as soon as they reach the compulsory 
school-age limit of 14. These young people all need what 
evening schools are designed to give. Cannot these schools be so 
modified in their methods and organization, as to attract a larger and 
more regular attendance with even a smaller outlay of money? 

May not the three schools be profitably united into one, held in 
the English High School building with a better classification, and 
fewer teachers? 

May we not secure greater regularity of attendance by requiring a 
deposit of a dollar or two from every pupil who registers, to be re- 
turned at the close of the term, provided attendance has been rea- 
sonably satisfactory, a plan that has been found to work well in other 
cities? 

Will not the adoption of a regular course of study, and the award 
of a certificate upon its satisfactory completion, be an advantage ? 

Shall we not gain by increasing the length of the term at least to 
the extent of holding five sessions each week instead of four? If this 
should be done the extra session might be devoted ''to lectures de- 
livered by competent persons on the natural sciences, history, and 
kindred subjects," in accordance with an enactment of the Legislature 
of 1894, "authorizing cities and towns to provide for evening 
lectures." 

Our city has reached a population of 50,000, and hence under the 
law is obliged " to establish and maintain an evening High School, 
provided fifty persons competent and willing to attend petition for it." 
Should such school be demanded, it would naturally be kept in the 



226 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

English High School building, and thus all the evening school work 
of the city could be concentrated under one management, with a de- 
crease of expenditure and an increase of efficiency. 

For several years, in addition to other evening schools, a school of 
industrial drawing has been maintained, which has been regularly 
attended by about 75 young men, who have pursued their work with 
system, enthusiasm, and profit. In October of this year, in answer to 
an urgent demand, a large class in free-hand drawing was formed, the 
interest in which has been well sustained. 

Table 18 in Appendix. 

XIII. COURSE OF STUDY. 

The work of teachers and pupils during the year has closely 
followed the lines and the time apportionment established in the 
course of study. The course is full and cannot be accomplished in 
its details in the time allotted. The aim has been to emphasize the 
essentials. Opinions as to what ^'essentials " are, differ widely. Each 
one judges from his own particular point of view. In establishing a 
criterion the fact must constantly be borne in mind that by far the 
largest proportion of our school children never enter the High School. 
Whatever the schools do to make the masses intelligent, useful, and 
loyal citizens must be done before they reach the age of fifteen. 
What will best accomplish this object is the vexed question. 

The purpose of education is two-fold : The acquisition of knowledge, 
and the acquisition of power. These cannot be separated. Power 
comes of necessity through wise methods of imparting knowledge. 
^' Not what is taught but how it is taught," and " Not what is learned 
but who teaches it," have become' educational aphorisms. Besides 
giving knowledge and power the schools should develop character, 
not incidentally, but objectively. Character, indeed, is power, endless 
for good or evil. The influence of a teacher and his methods are, 
therefore, as much more important than the subjects laught as the 
child is more valuable than the facts that he knows. But the ex- 
pression '^ practical knowledge " is not meaningless. To fit him for 
the activities of life a child must be taught to read our language under- 
standingly. He must be able to speak and to write it clearly and cor- 
rectly. He must have a knowledge of number sufficient for the 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 227 

ordinary uses of business life. He should have a general knowledge 
of the land and world in which he lives. He should know something 
of the history and the government of the country which he is to love 
and serve ; and he must have some acquaintance with the laws by which 
his life and health may be preserved. 

There is substantial agreement everywhere that these subjects — 
language, number, geography, history, and hygiene — are essential in 
common schools. They are, however, practically unlimited in their 
range, and hence, to what extent they should be taught has been a 
subject of discussion. 

To these generally acknowledged essentials we long since added 
music, for its refining and elevating influence ; drawing, as a form of 
expression and manual training, and a means of developing the artistic 
sense ; book-keeping, to furnish a little knowledge of accounts ; sewing, 
for its practical utility and training; gymnastics, for their hygienic in- 
fluence and their value in bringing every muscle of the body under 
immediate control of the will ; and more recently, the study of nature 
and its laws as revealed in countless forms about us, sending the child 
to the original source of knowledge to observe and investigate for 
himself, and to 

" Find tongues in trees, books in the running brooks. 
Sermons in stones, and good in everything." 

As soon as possible we shall establish Kindergartens, and provide 
some form of wood-work for boys. 

Shall we be satisfied to stop here, or shall we heed the suggestions 
of those who speak to us from near the top of the hill of science, and 
add, to an already overloaded curriculum, the studies of Latin, and 
algebra, and geometry, and possibly a modern language or two? 
Shall we consider the quality or the quantity, the thoroughness or the 
variety of our teaching? The transfer of college-bound pupils from 
the eighth grade of the grammar schools to the Latin High School 
will leave us free to provide for the wants of the great majority who re- 
main, untrammelled by the demands of the higher institutions of 
learning. 

Other cities and towns are experimenting with courses of study. 
No one yet knows what is best. Shall we not do well to await the 
result of the process of evolution? What we need is not additional 

(14J) 



228 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

subjects of instruction, but more thorough and scientific methods of 
teaching what we already have. It may be wise even to ehminate 
rather than to add. If we can secure the best teachers, reduce the 
number of pupils assigned to each, provide suitable accommodations 
and appliances, and give the teacher time and freedom to work with 
individuals instead of classes, we shall have accomplished much 
toward increasing the efficiency of our schools. 

One test of successful teaching is the love of knowledge and the 
desire for more which it creates in the mind of the learner. To 
awaken interest, to excite thought, to create a love for study, to make 
learning attractive, to produce dissatisfaction with present attainments 
— these are among the aims of the true teacher. Those whose school 
life is shortened by untoward circumstances need the inspiration of 
these influences even more than the fortunate few whose opportunities 
are unlimited. 

It is very important that a love for good reading should be culti- 
vated and strengthened among the boys and girls of the upper grades 
of the grammar school. It is no easy thing to do this in these days 
of cheap and enervating, not to say pernicious, literature. More good 
books are needed in the upper grades, not scrappy selections, but 
volumes of the best literature — of biography, of history, of poetry, of 
travel, of the best fiction. These should be read under the direction 
of teachers, not only aloud, but silently. To do this, time should be 
taken from less important subjects. What better service can we 
render our graduates than to send them out into a world of books 
with a discriminating taste for good reading, and open to all the inspir- 
ing and refining influences that come from the best in the field of 
literature ? 

Much may be done in this direction by a wise use of the public 
library, but its supply of books is too limited in number to satisfy the 
demands. A thousand dollars spent annually in carrying out these 
suggestions would yield a larger return than any other equal amount 
spent by the School Board. 

XIV. SCHOOL SUPPLIES. 

The attempt has been made to exercise due economy in the use of 
supplies. Superfluous books have been collected from some school 
buildings and distributed to others in need. Careful accounts have 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



229 



been kept with each school, and by the Principal with each teacher. 
The last Friday of each month has been designated as '' book-inspection 
day," at which time ail school property in the hands of pupils is ex- 
amined, losses and injuries detected, and repairs and settlements 
made. It has been the policy to keep each book substantially covered. 
The covers are renewed when worn or badly soiled. The expense 
has been considerable, but the advantage seems to justify the outlay. 

To some extent in the upper grades, paper has been substituted 
for slates. This substitution will be extended during the coming year, 
in the interest of cleanliness and health as well as of habits of neatness 
and care. 

There has been an unusual outlay of $1,228 for music books, occa- 
sioned by the purchase of a new book for the upper grades, and by 
the need of preventing the annoyance resulting from the use of the 
same set of books by different classes. Many books now in use are 
badly worn, and will need to be replaced during the coming year. 

In Tables 2 and 3 in the Appendix the cost of supplies 
furnished to each school during the year is shown, as well as the cost 
per capita. In making comparisons it must be noted that some 
schools were better supplied with materials at the beginning of the 
year than others. The unusual cost in the Bingham and the Durell 
Schools is caused by the opening of new rooms. 

XV. WORK OF SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

No reports from special teachers have been requested. It is, how- 
ever, but just to them to say that they have conducted their special 
departments during the year with enthusiasm and success. 

Drawing, under the direction of its efficient Supervisor, has made 
steady progress. Increased skill and relish for the work, as well as a 
growing taste for the beautiful are apparent in all the grades. The 
time spent upon drawing in the primary grades has been slightly re- 
duced and given to music and language. 

As heretofore, two systems of teaching music have been in use 
during the year, the Normal method in the five low^er grades, and the 
National system m the other grades, including the High School. 
Under the guidance of the enthusiastic Director, the lower grades 
have made remarkable progress. Theory and practice have kept step 
with each other, and a permanent foundation has been laid for ad- 



230 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



vanced work. The difficulties of transition from one system to 
another in the sixth grade have this year been hardly noticeable. 

Of the work in music in the upper grammar grades and in the 
High School, it need only be said that it has been under the direction 
of the veteran teacher of music, so intimately connected with the 
musical taste and culture of the present generation of Somerville 
citizens. The crowded condition of the High School has interfered 
somewhat with the best results, but the completion of the new building 
will give an impetus to the work in this direction, and will require 
a readjustment of the time of the instructors. 

Sewing continues to be taught to the girls of the fourth to the 
seventh grades inclusive, in the same methodical and scientific way, 
by the two teachers who have given character and distinction to the Som- 
erville system of teaching sewing. No work done in our schools is 
more practical or furnishes better training. It should be supplemented 
by instruction in cooking, given to the girls of the eighth and ninth 
grades. 

In accordance with the recommendation made in the last annual 
report, the efficient services of a special instructor in the Ling system 
of gymnastics were secured at the beginning of the school year in 
September. New interest and enthusiasm have been awakened, and the 
exercises have taken on fresh life and vigor. If the same services can 
be continued for the remainder of the school year, the work willbe estab- 
lished on a permanent basis, and can thenceforth be conducted by the 
regular teachers. 

XVI. GRADING. 

In the last annual report the subject of grading was discussed at 
considerable length. Closer observation of the conditions and needs 
of the schools furnishes no reasons for a change of view, but rather 
confirms it, and leads to a renewal of the recommendations made a 
year ago. The establishment of a five years' course in the Latin High 
School for college-bound pupils leaving the eighth grade, will change 
the situation a little, and lessen the necessity for hurrying children out 
of the grammar schools. 

The object we seek to accomplish is fourfold. 

First, to keep the children whose education is to be limited, in the 
grammar schools as long as possible, and to do the most for them 
while they are there. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 231 

Second, to give to bright pupils work in quality and quantity com- 
mensurate with their ability, and at the same time to facilitate their 
progress through the grammar schools in order that they may gain time 
for advanced courses. 

Third, to give those pupils who think slowly or mature late, an 
opportunity to do their best without discouragement or undue expend- 
iture of time. 

Fourth, to give to mediocre pupils, who make the large majority 
of every class, time and opportunity to do thoroughly, without haste 
on the one hand or repression on the other, as much work of the most 
advantageous kind as our courses offer. 

These purposes can be accomplished without impracticable semi- 
annual class promotions from room to room, by the plan outlined in 
detail last year, the arguments in favor of which were then given. 

A distinguished educator in a recent discussion of this general 
subject, gives views that appear so sound as to warrant quoting him at 
some length. He says — 

" What shall be done with the boy who learns or seems to learn 
more rapidly than his mates? Is not the answer to be found in the 
proper conduct of the recitation, that is, in correct, broad teaching? 

" Broad teaching has in view as its chief purpose the development 
of the individual and, when it gives thought to anything else, teaches 
subjects rather than lessons, sections, or paragraphs. It has little con- 
sideration for classes as wholes, but sees them as composed of so many 
persons, each of whom has a certain capacity for doing the work in 
hand. A subject taught may be one thing to one child but a very dif- 
ferent thing to another, yet it may be well taught to each. A child 
while getting his first percepts may be profitably employed much of 
the time m testing them by example, finding other like things, and by 
authority, if he can read, getting the testimony of others who have 
found and examined the same things. Knowledge, even on the per- 
ceptive side, that is not confirmed by much testimony of example and 
authority will not be firmly possessed. The teaching that does not 
give opportunity for getting this kind of assurance and for developing 
a self-confidence that proceeds from evidence secured by self-activity 
is not the best. Of this kind of work the talented child will do much, 
whereas a dull or lazy pupil will get nothing more with which to assure 
himself than the work done in class by or under the eye of the teacher. 
Then there will be as many grades between these as there are 
pupils. 

"The application of a subject may be narrow to one pupil because 



232 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

of his lack of ability to see and his lack of power to investigate, though 
he may work long and faithfully, but very broad and far reaching to 
another pupil who has power to see and the ability and disposition to 
investigate for himself. The teaching that presents subjects to the 
capacities of every child is the only teaching by which the graded 
school can do justice to all who attend it, and secure the approbation 
of all who send to it. Not rapid promotion by which the child is 
rushed into one new thing after another, but correct teaching, by 
which the child is given opportunity to broaden his knowledge of the 
subject learned, to note its manifold applications in life, and to 
acquaint himself with the labor and writings of those who have investi- 
gated, mastered, and applied it, is the remedy for the graded school 
evil. Not more machine that will grind the pupil finer and shoot him 
through more rapidly, but less machine that will allow him more 
opportunity to develop individuality, will offer to him better chances to 
work for himself and to be wholly himself when at work, is the remedy 
to be sought. The graded school must not be made a machine by 
which the same horizon is fixed for all. A boy, broad minded (for his 
age), practical, knowing how to teach himself, and knowing how to 
learn and what to do with what he learns, may be graduated from the 
grammar school at 15 years of age, but a boy of that age and having 
like qualifications and corresponding acquirements cannot be graduated 
from the High School. The requirements of the two modes of teach- 
ing the course of study involve two kinds of student life that are 
wholly unlike ; they are as different as self-activity and confiding 
passivity. 

*' Children under 14 years of age, however talented apparently, 
with few exceptions, are not competent to study profitably the work 
given in the first year of our high schools. Some of them may do 
the work passably, as class work is too frequently rated, but they can 
get very little good out of it, very little that will tell for manly inde- 
pendent doing in life. 

^'The minimum age at which the High School should be reached 
should be prescribed ; the minimum' age at which the college should 
be reached should be prescribed, and the attempt to reach either of 
these goals at an earlier age should be proscribed. This should be 
done in the interest of the future man, and in the interest of broader 
knowledge. 

'' Graduation from school, or membership in a higher class thereof, 
ought to be evidence of culture and strength. That too frequently it 
is neither need not be asserted. It is unwise from more than one 
point of view to push the pupils rapidly through a graded course of 
instruction, and no child should be allowed to think that to be pro- 
moted or graduated is even a remote purpose of going to school. 

^' In teaching, the attempt should be made to reach each individual 
in the class, and to give such instruction and such direction for .home 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. '^OO 

or seat work as will induce him to employ his whole self, to put forth 
his best efforts for its accomplishment, and at the same time point out 
the most profitable way of doing it. The recitation should be such 
that the child is not only permitted, but is expected to present that 
which he has done. The talented boy will give much, the mediocre 
less, the more unfortunate boy little, yet each will give the result of his 
best effort. To conduct the recitation by this plan the teacher must 
employ the time allotted to the teaching part of it largely for the 
development of principles, and such easy applications as require little 
or no time for their interpretation or solution. In the recitation, 
which is but a small part of the time devoted to school life by the 
pupil of whatever capacity, the children can work together profitably. 
In the hours of preparation, hunting for different kinds of testimony, 
and making applications, the pupils work apart, as one man in business 
or in a profession, distances another; each has full opportunity 
for the exercise of all his powerS; each knows what to do and is inter- 
ested in accomplishing as much as possible. 

''The teaching required by the conditions that characterize the 
profitable recitation can be done only by the well-informed teacher. 
Acquired skill in the management of classes or in the presentation or 
development of subjects will count for little in the absence of broad, 
accurate knowledge. Poor teaching results more frequently from a too 
limited knowledge of what is to be taught than from a lack of skill in 
presenting or developing subjects. 

" The teacher must not only know the subject he would teach, but 
that he may properly direct pupils in their home work, he must know- 
no less definitely many sources of knowledge respecting the same 
which he can cite with great exactness. He must know the respective 
values of such sources of information, the difficulties which each offers 
to the searcher for information, that he mav correctly iuds:e of the 
value of results presented to him. It is not enough to know the sub- 
ject to be taught; where it can be learned and how it can be learned 
are important in directing pupils, and how the subject is applied when 
learned is not one bit less important. Equipped with this knowledge 
the teacher is able so to conduct a recitation that each pupil will learn 
according to his ability and his self-control, and so to direct the seat 
or home w-ork that each will find abundant opportunity to employ his 
whole time and energy in the preparation of work for the succeeding 
exercise. 

'•' If there is plenty of collateral work arranged and prescribed for 
pupils, they who are well up in grade may be left for a greater part 
of the time each day to take care of themselves while the time and 
attention of the teacher may be given to individuals needing special 
direction or other special helps. 

'' Not only must good teachers be provided if the work here spoken 
of is to be done, but appliances must be furnished by which it can be 



234 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

done, and opportunity given or allowed for doing it. Books must be 
furnished on the right subjects, properly graded, and in numbers large 
enough to supply classes. Bookcases, reference tables, and experi- 
menting rooms must be provided- The work requires specimens for 
study, apparatus and materials for making experiments. Time must 
be allowed for visiting' museums, and for getting into the fields to 
examine objects that cannot be brought into the schoolroom. 

" The schools must not be too large. Forty or forty-five pupils is the 
maximum number that a teacher can instruct and guide, except by 
use of the machine. The more pupils he has the more machine he 
must employ ; the more machine he employs the less culture, individual 
strength, and knowledge will he give to the community for its outlay 
of money and the time of the children. 

*' By the correct kind of teaching and directing, pupils learn what 
books are for, how to discriminate between the good and the bad in 
books, and how to use them advantageously. The effect of the adjust- 
ment of work to the capacities of pupils, and furnishing appliances for 
their profitable employment is to give them a liking for study, the 
result of which is that they remain longer in school and that the num- 
ber that seek further advantages in higher institutions of learning 
increases year by year. These effects are great enough in our schools 
to be noticeable, and the increase is large enough to be measurable." 

XVII. IN CONCLUSION. 

A year ago, after a limited opportunity for observation, this remark 
was made in my report : " It appears that our schools as a whole are 
accomplishing the results for which they are established and sustained, 
in as satisfactory a way as their crowded condition allows." This 
statement can justly be repeated to-day, after a much more extended 
opportunity for judging. Not that our schools are beyond criticism 
or improvement under existing conditions. Far from it. No one is 
better aware of this than Superintendent and teachers themselves, 
and in this fact lies the hope of the future. Ideal standards are before 
us, and it is our ambition to reach them. There is steady gain along 
many lines. There is a growing appreciation of the value of a child, 
a Quicker sympathy with his needs, a better knowledge of the mind 
and the laws of its growth, more success in influencing life by control- 
ling motives, a truer judgment of the relative value of studies, greater 
.effort to reach the individual and meet his wants, more regard for the 
correlation of subjects taught, an improvement in methods of teaching, 
a desire to widen the horizon of knowledge both for teacher and 



I 



SCHOOL depart:\ient. 235 

pupils, a conviction that less importance attaches to knowledge itself 
than to the way it is obtained, a stronger determination to put soul into 
teaching, to inspire noble aims, to implant sound principles, and to 
incite to honorable achievement. 

Chief among the results of the year's study of our schools is this 
firm conviction, that the secret of success is with the teachers. They 
alone touch the children. The city may provide costly buildings and 
furnish the best appliances. The School Board may vote large salaries 
and devise excellent courses of study. Supervisors may wisely counsel 
and direct and lead. But the teacher alone is the life-giving force 
that reaches the child and controls his future. Hence the teachers 
selected should be what the children should become. 

The citizens of Somerville have a right to expect much from their 
schools. They have devised liberal things for them. They may be 
assured that the schools are steadily improving in their instruction, 
their discipline, their influence. They invite examination and criti- 
cism and suggestion. They ask continued co-operation and support. 
In return theyVill do their part towards making intelligent, virtuous, 
loyal citizens, ready to serve their city, and maintain the high char- 
acter and position it holds among the municipalities of the Common- 
wealth. 

The Superintendent wishes to assure the members of the School 
Board of his grateful appreciation of their confidence and support, 
and to thank principals and teachers for their hearty and sympathetic 
co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. A. SOUTHWORTH, 

Super in tendefi t. 
Somerville, Dec. 31, 1894. 




CITIZENS FOR WHOM SOMERVILLE SCHOOLS ARE NAMED. 



APPENDIX 



r 



CONTENTS OF APPENDIX. 



CONCERNING FINANCE. 

No. OF Tarle. 

1. Schedule of school property. 

2. Cost of maintaining schools, 1894. 

3. Cost per capita of maintaining schools, 1894. 

4. Cost of maintaining schools for a series of years. 

5. Cost per capita of maintaining schools for a series of years. 

6. Amount spent annually for new school buildings, and lor repairs for 
a series of years. 

CONCERNING PUPILS. 

7. Population of Somerville for a series of years. 

8. School census for a series of years, and by districts for 1894. 

9. Attendance, etc., of the schools for 1894. 

10. Statistics of the High School, 1894. 

11. Separate statistics for Grammar and Primary Schools, 1894. 

12. Number of schools and pupils by districts, 1894. 

13. Pupils by grades, December, 1894. 

14. Pupils in each grade, and per cent of whole number. 

15. Admissions to First grade in April and September. 

16. Truant statistics, 1894. 

17. Number of Grammar School graduates, 1894. 

18. Evening School statistics, 1894. 

19. Grammar School graduates for a series of years. 

20. Attendance statistics of all schools for a series of years. 

21. Statistics of the High School for a series of years. 

CONCERNING TEACHERS. 



22 



2 



24 

25 
26 
27 
28 
29 



Resignations of teachers, 1894. 

Teachers elected in 1894. 

Transfers of teachers, as to schools. 

Transfers of teachers, as to grades. 

Leave of absence of teachers. 

Time lost by teachers, 1894. 

Number of teachers employed for a series of years. 

Names of teachers in High School since its organization. 



240 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

No. OF Table. 

30. Changes in text-books, 1894. 

31. High School graduation exercises, 1894. 

32. Grammar School graduation exercises, 1894. 
;^;^. Teachers in service in December, 1894. 

34. Amendments to School Regulations. 

35. Recent State School Legislation. 

36. Rules for the government of janitors. 

27' Biographical Sketches of Citizens of Somerville, after whom certain 
of its schools are named. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



241 



TABLE 1.— SCHOOLHOL'SES. 







•6 

V 

O 3 




Size of 




When 


o 2 






Name. 


d ^ 


Ib- 




Valuation. 




o « 


Enlargements. 






>> 


J" 


Lot. 




built. 


V 




1 


High School, 








^50,000 


1871 


23 




2 


Prescott, 


12 




21,444 


47,000 


1867 


27 




3 


Edgerly, 


12 




26,428 


47,000 


1871 


23 


4 rooms added ] s82. 
; 4 " " 1S92. 


4 


L. V. Bell, 


12 




23,396 


47,000 


1874 


20 




5 


C. G. Pope, 


12 




27,236 


G2,000 


1891 


3 




G 


0. S. Knapp, 


12 




24,517 


47,000 


1889 


o 




7 


Forster, 


12 




27,499 


47,000 


1866 


28 




8 


Morse, 


12 




29,109 


47,000 


1869 


25 


G rooms added 1890. 





Highland, 


12 




23,260 


47,000 


1880 


14 


4 rooms added 1891. 


10 


J. T. Glines, 


8 




28,800 


4G,400 


1891 


3 




11 


Bingham, 


8 




21,017 


80.000 


1886 


8 


4 rooms added 1894. 


12 


Prospect Hill, 


6 


4 


25,313 


21,000 


1848 


46 


4 rooms added 18G5. 


13 


Davis, 


4 


. . 


38,152 


25,700 


1884 


10 




14 


Bennett, 


4 


1 


20,560 


10,600 


1868 


26 




15 


Jackson, 


4 


1 


11,212 


8,600 


1861 


33 




IG 


Cummings, 


4 




11,300 


15,700 


1884 


10 




17 


Franklin, 


4 




33,017 


15,600 


1846 


48 


2 rooms added 1862. 


18 


G. W. Durell, 


4 


. . 


13,883 


19,000 


1894 






19 


Burns, 


4 




16,080 


15,700 


1886 


8 




20 


Lincoln, 


4 


. . 


17,662 


14,700 


1885 


9 




21 


Beech Street, 


2 




6,000 


4,800 


1872 


22 




22 


Cedar Street, 


1 






800 


1843 


51 


/ Moved from Broad- 

1 way 1868. 

r Moved from Cherry 


23 


Harvard, 


1 
155 


6 


9,810 


3, GOO 


1851 


43 


< street 1867, from 
[ Kent street 1871 




Total, 




$673,200 








242 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 2. — COST OF MAINTAINING SCHOOLS, 1894. 



School. 


Instruction 
• and 


Janitors, 
Water, Heat, 


School Supply 


Total. 




Supervision. 


Light. 


Expenses. 




High . . . 


^15,740 35 


$1,645 60 


$1,792 48 


$19,178 43 


Bell . 






10,272 20 


1,296 99 


768 37 


12,337 56 


Edgerly . 






10,095 42 


2,219 90 


875 08 


13,190 40 


Forster 






9,106 66 


1,329 65 


730 40 


11,466 71 


Highland . 






10,064 70 


1,610 08 


728 03 


12,402 81 


Morse / . 






10,103 55 


1,545 18 


823 83 


12,472 56 


Pope 






9,770 46 


1,712 95 


594 90 


12,078 31 


Prescott . 






10,445 75 


1,432 18 


767 05 


12,644 98 


Knapp 






7,687 00 


1,287 37 


607 09 


9,581 46 


Bingham . 






5,016 94 


902 44 


760 87 


6,680 25 


Glines 






5,740 68 


1,068 65 


459 10 


7,268 43 


Prospect Hill 






4,109 33 


606 13 


170 91 


4,886 37 


Burns 






3,064 06 


586 62 


120 67 


3,771 35 


Cummings 






2,340 86 


506 05 


84 63 


2,931 54 


Davis 






2,820 31 


529 86 


103 84 


3,454 01 


Durell 






1,092 61 


205 00 


275 09 


1,572 70 


Franklin . 






2,819 39 


489 83 


249 88 


3,559 10 


Lincoln 






3,455 04 


691 03 


262 96 


4,409 03 


Bennett 






1,929 29 


311 95 


43 59 


2,284 83 


Jackson . 






1,892 04 


353 91 


59 87 


2,305 82 


Beech Street 






1,349 03 


178 70 


64 19 


1,591 92 


Cedar Street 






1,173 71 


188 19 


51 21 


1,413 11 


Harvard . 






624 51 


100 28 


12 54 


737 33 


Evening School 






1,905 50 


. 236 00 


260 15 


2,401 65 


English High 








222 00 




222 00 


Spring Hill 








60 00 




60 00 


Total 


^132,919 39 


121,316 54 


$10,666 73 


$164,902 6Q 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



243 



TABLE 3. — COST PER CAPITA OF MAINTAINING SCHOOLS, 1894. 





Instruction 


Janitors, 


School Supply 
Expenses. 




School. 


and 
Supervision. 


Water, Heat, 
and Light. 


Total. 


High .... 


$25 72 


$2 69 


$2 93 


$Sl 34 


Bell . 








18 05 


2 28 


1 35 


21 68 


Edgerly 








17 84 


3 92 


1 55 


23 31 


Forster 








17 23 


2 44 


1 34 


21 01 


Highland 








17 60 


2 82 


1 27 


21 75 


Morse . 








17 82 


2 73 


1 45 


22 00 


Pope . 








19 46 


3 41 


1 19 


24 06 


Prescott 








18 65 


2 50 


1 37 


22 58 


Knapp 








20 50 


3 43 


1 62 


25 55 


Bingham 








15 83 


2 85 


2 40 


21 OS 


Glines . 








15 99 


2 98 


1 28 


20 25 


Prospect Hil 


1 






17 87 


2 64 


74 


21 25 


Burns . 








15 02 


2 88 


59 


18 49 


Cummings 








13 77 


2 98 


50 


17 25 


Davis . 








13 89 


2 61 


51 


17 01 


Durell . 








13 49 


2 51 • 


1 35 


17 35 


Franklin 








16 88 


2 93 


1 50 


21 31 


Lincoln 








16 69 


3 34 


1 27 


21 30 


Bennett 








15 69 


2 54 


36 


18 59 


Jackson 








17 85 


3 34 


57 


21 76 


Beech Street 






16 25 


2 15 


77 


19 17 


Cedar Street 






22 57 


3 62 


99 


27 18 


Harvard 






13 88 


2 23 


28 


16 39 


Average 


$18 43 


$2 96 


$1 51 


$22 90 



(15) 



244 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 4. —ANNUAL COST OF MAINTAINING THE SCHOOLS 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 

Amounts are given to the nearest dollar and include what has been paid for 
maintaining day and evening schools of all grades. 





Average 


Instruction 


Water 






School 




Year. 


Member- 


and 


and 


Heating. 


Janitors. 


Contingent 


Total. 




ship. 


Supervision. 


Light. 






Expenses. 




1885 


4,904 


$ 79,506 


$ 728 


$ 4,965 


$ 4,000 


$ 8,449 


$ 97,648 


1886 


4,985 


83,542 


624 


4,929 


4,194 


6,676 


99,865 


1887 


5,198 


86,713 


765 


6,475 


5,084 


7,526 


106,563 


1888 


5,488 


88,967 


953 


7,121 


5,892 


7,421 


110,354 


1889 


5,956 


96,466 


805 


6,081 


6,448 


9,903 


119,703 


1890 


6,486 


104,184 


1,004 


5,586 


7,539 


10,371 


128,684 


1891 


6,502 


114,066 


1,047 


8,032 


8,544 


13,899 


145,588 


1892 


7,035 


124,232 


1,064 


7,148 


9,795 


12,944 


155,183 


1893 


7,217 


128,720 


1,014 


8,312 


10.160 


10,137 


158,333 


1894 


7,212 


132,919 


958 


9,673 


10,686 


10,919 


165,155 



TABLE 5.— ANNUAL COST PER CAPITA OF MAINTAINING SCHOOLS 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 
[Based on the average membership.] 















Ratio of 




Instruction 


Janitors, 


School 






cost of 


Year. 


and 


Water, 


Supply- 


Total. 


Assessors' valua- 


school main- 




Supervision. 


Heat, and 
Light. 


Expenses. 




tion of City. 


tenance to 
valuation. 


1885 


^16 21 


^1 98 


^1 72 


$ 19 91 


$ 24,878,400 


.00392 


1886 


16 76 


1 94 


1 34 


20 03 


26,003,200 


.00384 


1887 


16 68 


2 37 


1 45 


20 50 


27,469,300 


.00388 


1888 


16 21 


2 54 


1 36 


20 11 


28,756,400 


.00384 


1889 


16 20 


2 24 


1 66 


20 10 


30,004,600 


.00399 


1890 


16 06 


2 18 


1 60 


19 84 


32,557,500 


.00395 


1891 


17 54 


2 71 


2 14 


22 39 


36,843,400 


.00395 


1892 


17 66 


2 56 


1 84 


22 06 


38,093,100 


.00407 


1893 


17 84 


2 70 


1 40 


21 94 


41,773,600 


.00379 


1894 


18 43 


2 96 


1 51 


22 90 


44,142,900 


.00374 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



245 



TABLE G. — AMOUNT SPENT ANNUALLY FOR NEW SCHOOLHOUSES, 

AND FOR REPAIRS 

FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 




* Including heating apparatus in both High School buildings. 



TABLE 7. —POPULATION OF SOMERVILLE. 



1842 . 


1,013 


1875 .... 


. ^1.594 


1850 . 


3,540 


1880 .... 


. 24,985 


1860 


8,025 


1885 .... 


29,992 


1865 . 


9,366 


1890 .... 


. 40,117 


1870 


14,693 


1894 (Estimated) 


51,510 



246 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 8.— SCHOOL CENSUS, 1894. 

Number of children in the city between 5 and 15 years of age, as reported 
by the truant officer, on the first of May. 



1885 . 


5,608 


1890 


6,469 


1886 . 


5.296 


1891 


6,800 


1887 . 


5,722 


1892 


7,191 


1888 . 


5,959 


1893 


7,601 


1889 . 


6,135 


1894 . 


8,040 



BY DISTRICTS FOR 1894. 



District. 


1893. 


1894. 


Increase. 


Increase 
Per Cent. 


East Somerville 
Prospect Hill .... 
Winter Hill .... 
Spring Hill .... 
West Somerville 


1,405 
2,823 
1,218 
1,126 
1,029 


1,459 
2,977 
1,276 
1,200 
1,128 


54 
154 
58 
74 
99 


3.84 
5,45 
4.76 
6.57 
9.62 


Total .... 


7,601 


8,040 


439 


5.78 


Between 8 and 14 


4,723 


4,993 


270 


5.72 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



24' 





1—' 


H- c: ic tc t: t- ~ — - — - — — V- v: tc tc ti x tc tc tc tc 4- 


Rooms occupied 1 
in December, 




H 
o 


r-' -. ft rt ^ c -• 7; e y c c — =• -■ c r^ - -. c n, c :r. 

^ '-• ^ en "^ — 

^. 2. ft 






^ : 




. 


yi 








* 


"a 


ex 

^1 


M — tc tc rc ic tc — io ^ C5 ^ Cn ^1 -1 -I r-. r: ' Annual 

cr. •-' =:i 3^ - V- v^ — >J X' r- r ' .^ t: 55 *: ^ " *r :*r I* ~ •*- 1 Enrollment. 
QciiwO^i^io — -^r^w^:n:ooDClQot5c^Oi;-^^c^— 


1—' 


"to 

1— ' 

to 


tc ^ — fc — re — t« ;c ^c s^ c« :r» Ci zn ir :n :;» r; 
4>. ^; w» X c re c r: X c^ -1 O o« ^ =-. c: r; -I -1 4- c-. c. — 
tn O bo ic c. ii ^1 ^j — ic O 4- iS ^1 C to -J ;;« O Ci c; '.^ re 


Average 
Membership. 


o 


a 

4- 

o 


ic ^ .— 1— — w_ ^ i; :^ c 4^ en :^ v» :.-i --T v» v- Average 
;t ^ ^ ^r^ :: r. 5 ^ri 8 5 ^ 5 S ;^ 3^ 5-: ^ ^ t § 32 1 Attendance. 


_ 


p^ 


.- -^ — — 


Per cent of 
Attendance. 


4* 


4- 

be 


O r: "x c V^ en ^ "— • io zz '— • cr '-i ^i 4- 4^ vi \^ iz -c '^^ '~a >^ 




o 


H-i-i i-ii-. — i-" ^ ^tc_-_-^ — tc! No. cases of 
5 S g g 5 S ?: 8 ^ ^. H: 5 ?, i^ H Hi a rl :i -i S S n 1 Tardiness. 

1 


"be 


"ere 

O 


i_.i— .i>o i—'-^.i-tC'— 'tc No. cases of 
1— i>4xi_i)--' rc-^+^i— 'Ccx— 'Oi— '^it^^i-1— — C^:^ Dismissal 
fco 00 4=- 4^ -^ ^ X a; ec -^ 4- tc tc 4- :^ to :;. tc — tc — tc i.'ismissai. 

1 


en 


XI ^ "^cbc 1— '1— 'icic 'tctc No. cases of 

4- :.c X -^ c c tc :;^ c; C -c ■-; r: tc t: -1 ~ — r: :,. Punishment. 


'!+>' 1 "oz 

! 


ro ro— ' to— '>— 'eito:n4-c^:^r:r:t^:nc: No. attending 

c: 4- --t --C to ic ~ X — ~^i ^s ^5 H- ^c --i — ^1 C; — t^ Gc c; ; in Tanuarv 

-^1 --1 c: -- to in to to vi oc X -^ 4- c: ic 4- :n o :^ X -.r :^ 1 j^uudry. 

1 


-1 

V 


"Ci 


to — ' ^ bo — to to — to tc ic :n :n r< cc — wT :n :n C". No. attending 

1^ C: Ci ^1 >— ic — r: ^i C X c: — -^ r; ^i — wi Si Ci c: in December 

O 00 o x^4- cc X -T --; -1 r: -c r: - — - - — - to Ci 00 to ^° i^ecemoer. 


>f^ 
-q 




4>-4'Ccioi;4^cn+'enJn*-:n4'4>-4>-4»-4>-4^c;fJ-4^4>.4i. 

o:iOwOc4^4^f-i4^4i-4-r>cxcn::?wn^c: — 4-c;c;4- 


Average No. 
to Teacher 


--1 


-^ 


tc ::n to ^1 to to to ^ :n :n to ic ic u^ to ;n — 


in December. 

i 


ex 




:,-! No. over 15 
^~^___..^^ ^if^rr^.-',-^^.--;::::"?^^'? years of age. 




"bO 


>-i4^C;3b04^r;cr:^itoc:X4-4^--ii-^;cic:^x:sc;toi— ' 
cc ^ 30 bo Ci ti ta -:i ic :7t :c o — wt i' -I c^ — c --^ tc X en 


No. between 8 

and 14 years 

of age. 



> 

r 
w 



I 
> 



PI 
2: 

o 
> 

n 



H 

c: 

w 

r— I 
»— t 

n 

n 
X 
c 
o 
r 



00 

4^ 



248 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 10. — STATISTICS OF THE HIGH SCHOOL, 1894. 



Whole number of different pupils during the year 

Largest number at one time 

Number admitted during the year 
'' from our Grammar Schools 
" from other schools . 
'' graduated .... 

" of graduates who entered college 
^' of graduates who entered Scientific Schools 
'' of graduates who entered Medical School 
" who have left during the year exclusive of graduates 

Whole number at the present time, December, 1894 

Average number to a teacher 

Number over 15 years of age 

'^ in course preparatory to college 

'' pursuing the regular course 

*' pursuing the English course 

'' pursuing the Scientific course . 

" in the first class when it entered the school 

" in the first class at the present time . 

" in the second class when it entered the school 

^' in the second class at the present time 

" in the third class when it entered the school 

'' in the third class at the present time 

" in the fourth class when it entered the school 

" in the fourth class at the present time 



896 
691 
293 
253 

40 
111 

30 

o 
O 

2 
123 
662 
44.1 
572 
230 
176 
209 

27 
218 

94 
238 
130 
251 
177 
285 
261 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



249 



TABLE 11. — PUPILS IX HIGH AND GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Number of persons in the city on the first day of May, 1804, between 5 and 15 
years of age, 8,040. 

Number between S and 14 years of age, 4,993. 







Grammar 






High School. 


and Primary 
Schools. 


Total. 


Annual enrollment ..... 


641 


8,74(; 


'.»,3S7 


Average membership 








612 


6,000 


7,212 


Average attendance . 








584 


6,256 


6,840 


Per cent of attendance 








95.4 


94.8 


94.8 


Number cases of tardiness . 








333 


2,667 


3,000 


Number cases of dismissal . 










2,509 


2,509 


Number cases of punishment 










314 


314 


Membership, January, 1894 








603 


6,7S2 


7,3s5 


Membership, December, 1894 








662 


6,!»87 


7,(;4".> 


Average number to a teacher 








47.3 


46.8 


46.9 


Number over 15 years of age 








558 


392 


950 


Number between 8 and 14 years of age 




15 


4,213 


4,218 



TABLE 12. —NUMBER OF SCHOOLS AND PUPILS, BV DISTRICTS. 

December 1"), 181)4. 





No. of 
Schools. 


Number of Teachers. 


Number 

of 

Pupils. 


Number 
in Ninth 
Grade. 


Average 


DlSTRICjTS. 


a 


b 


c 


Number 
to a Room. 


East Somerville 
Prospect Hill 
Winter Hill . 
Spring Hill . 
West Somerville . 


28 
48 
28 
29 
16 


2 

1 

1 

1 


28 
48 
28 
29 
16 


2 

1 
2 


1,366 
2,166 
1,284 
1,337 
834 


81 
106 

65 

87 


48.8 
45.1 
45.9 
46.1 
52.1 


Totals . 




8 


149 


8 


6,987 


407 


46.9 



a. Principals of ninth-grade grammar schools. 

b. Regular teachers. 

c. Salaried assistants. 



250 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 13. — PUPILS BY GRADES, DECEMBER, 1894. 























-<* 








Teachers. 




Pupils 




Ave 


rage 


1 SI 


6 


















Ase. 


R^ 


E 




Grades. 




Women. 












o u 

US 


2V 








o-g 


Schools. 


\^ 


!/3 


3 fi 






C3 




'tn 

t/i 


in 


in 


13 
o 


OS 
4) 


c 
o 


.s «. 

<n C 
. O 

0-2 


o'-S 






^ 


a; 


< 


CQ 


o 


t-i 


> 


% 


Z 


a: 


High . . 


First Class . . 


3 


12 




35 


59 


94 


18 


6 






(I 


Second " . . 








35 


95 


130 


17 


4 






(< 


Third " . . 








74 


103 


177 


16 


4 






<( 


Fourth " . . 

Total . . . 

Ninth . . . 


3 

7 






106 


155 


261 


15 


7 








12 




250 


412 


662 










Grammar 


11 




189 


209 


398 


14 


10 


349 


s 




Eighth . . . 




10 




237 


221 


458 


14 





427 


1 




Seventh . . 


1 


14 




270 


320 


590 


13 


4 


395 


35 




Sixth . . . 




14 




313 


355 


668 


12 


5 


466 


18 




Fifth. . . . 




17 




406 


418 


824 


11 


5 


549 


12 




Fourth . . . 
Total Grammar 
Third . . . 


8 


17 


1 


417 


417 


834 


10 


2 


652 


23 




83 


1 


1,832 


1,940 


3,772 






2,838 


103 


Primary . 




19 


1 


432 


415 


847 


9 





745 


13 


(( ^ 


Second . . . 




21 


2 


516 


468 


984 


7 


10 


675 


14 


(( 


First .... 




26 


6 


705 


636 


1,341 


6 


4 


765 


26 




Kindergarten , 

Total Primary 

Total Grammar 
and Primary 

Grand Total . 




1 




20 


23 


43 










• 


8 


66 


9 


1,673 


1,542 


3,215 




* 


2,185 


53 




149 


10 


3,505 


3,482 


6,987 






5,023 


156 




11 


161 


10 


3,755 


3,894 


7,649 











SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



251 



TABLE U. — NUMBER OF PUPILS AND PER CENT OF WHOLE 
NUMBER OF PUPILS IN EACH GRADE IN DECEMBER, 1S04. 



Grade. Pupils. 



Per Cent. 



r 1 



1,384 



IS.l 






084 



12.0 



841 



11.1 



8P>4 



10.9 



824 



10.8 



l-i 

o 



0G8 



590 



8.8 



7.7 



458 



G.O 



398 



5.2 



10 



2G1 



3.4 



11 



_bJO ^ 



177 



2.2 



12 



130 



1.7 



113 



94 



1.2 



Total, 7,649 



252 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 15. — ADMISSIONS TO FIRST GRADE IN APRIL AND 

SEPTEMBER, 1894. 









On 








On 


School. 


April. 


Sept. 


Half 
Time. 


School. 


April. 


Sept. 


Half 
Time. 


Bell . 


23 


15 




Burns 


35 


35 


38 


Edgerly 


31 


45 




Cummings 


6 


43 




Forster 


34 


39 




Davis . 


21 


17 




Highland . 


18 


50 




Durell 





28 




Knapp 


28 


50 


47 


Franklin 


15 







Morse 


23 


24 


41 


Lincoln 


21 


22 




Pope . 


8 


49 




Bennett 


20 


23 




Prescott 


16 


41 


60 


Jackson 


6 


25 




Bingham 


29 


38 




Beech Stree 


t 7 


21 




Glines 


15 


39 




Cedar Stree 


t 5 


6 




Prospect Hill 


6 







Harvard 


5 


16 












Total 


372 


626 


186 



SCHOOL DEPARTIVIENT. 



253 



TABLE 16 



TRUANT STATISTICS. 





1893. 


1894. 


Number of visits to schools 


747 


795 


Absences investigated 


596 


490 


Cases of truancy .... 


159 


88 


Truants arrested .... 


10 


8 


Sent to House of Reformation 


3 


6 



Decrease in cases of truancy 45 per cent as compared with 
1893. 



TABLE 17. — GRAMMAR SCHOOL GRADUATES, 1894. 







Number 


Number 




Number receiv- 


Certificated 


that entered 


Schools. 


ing Diplomas. 


for 


the 






High School. 


High School. 


Prescott 


39 


36 


26 


Edgerly 






41 


39 


23 


Pope 






35 


28 


20 


Knapp 






32 


20 


9 


Bell . 






31 


28 


26 


Forster 






79 


75 


55 


rvlorse 






66 


54 


43 ' 


Highland . 






. 68 


62 


51 


Total . 






391 


342 


253 



254 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 18. —ATTENDANCE IN EVENING SCHOOLS, 1894. 




Cost for October 
" " November 
" " December 

Total 
Cost per Pupil 
Number of Sessions 



$4:60 50 
354 50 
289 90 

$ 1,104 90 

^9 21 
47 



EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL, 1894. 





Industrial. 


Free-Hand. 




October. 


November 


December 


October. 


November 


December 


Enrolled 


120 


123 


123 


98 


108 


113 


Average Membership 


109 


99 


83 


82 


90 


63 


Average Attendance 


103 


83 


63 


65 


59 


44 


Per cent Attendance 


94.5 


83.8 


75.9 


79.3 


65.5 


69.8 


Number of Teachers 


5 


5 


5 


3 


3 


3 


Pupils to Teacher . 


21.8 


19.8 


16.6 


41 


30 


21 



Cost of Instruction, etc. 

" " Supplies . 

" per Capita 
Number of Sessions 



$ 728 00 

253 15 

14 12 

23 



J; 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



ZOO 





jc Gc ;x cc X 7- 7- /- x x 

Zl il r c — o '-i X ~'i r^ -"t 




4»- 

O 


ri •ir jr ~ i! ---' -' ,V ^- ll Prescott. 


C5 


^ g- XT rj 2 ^ r^ r- £:- r] Beii. 


to 


- 1 o- - 1 ~ — — -.t re IC to 

-^ X -< — w< X — X r: X 


Forster. 


4- 




Morse. 


1 .>:rit^ti:;;t5;r.l^'J Highland. 


I—" 


*" ±: ±: I-i Edgerly. 


o 


cc o; OO' 
wj rs ri 


Pope. 


o 

o 


w §^ ::§ Knapp. 


to 
to 

4- 


ooootcrooototctC'-'hB 

0C^^^IV2h-X4-IOwI— ' 

c:: X o r: X ^ :^ — --1 I-- 


Total. 




~-Jt0C;0C;CiO4^CCX:;0 
4^wiCTtOO0^I^2Vi4-^- 


Average 

Membership of 

Grammar and 

Primary Schools. 

1 


bo 


_Ct c: c: 4^ cn ci w» 4^ 4- 4- Percent of Aver- 
cc C; I-' X ^1 in o --i to c; age Membership 

to o w X H- o ^ r; ->^ ct Graduating. 


1,863 


rototo^ — '— — — Entered 

cpt 4^ fcc S X Ci in 4^ So :,-« High School. 

oo O X O ff^ w C-. Ci oo Ci 




CiCiClCiwiCtCiCiCi^l 
px O 1— ' ^1 ^ O 4^ c; ^1 00 

o 00 bi to X J-' ^ c; bi 4^ 
4^Ofc0 00Ci4-:^r; — Ci 


Per cent 

entering of those 

Graduating. 



X 
X 

o 
< 

> 



r 



> 

5?* 

n 

o 
o 

r 

o 
> 

D 
C 
> 
H 
W 



256 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 20. — ATTENDANCE STATISTICS FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 















Ratio of 






Average 


Average 


Per cent of 


Number of 


Tardiness 


December. 


Enrollment. 


Membership. 


Attendance. 


Attendance. 


Tardinesses. 


to Average 
Attendance. 


1885 


6,276 


4,904 


4,627 


94.4 


2,480 


0.536 


1886 


6,350 


4,985 


4,678 


93.8 


2,834 


0.606 


1887 


6,605 


5,198 


4,879 


93.8 


2,699 


0.553 


1888 


7,262 


5,488 


5,174 


94.0 


2,938 


0.549 


1889 


7,757 


5,956 


5,585 


93.8 


2,780 


0.498 


1890 


7,878 


6,485 


6,075 


93.6 


3,133 


0.516 


1891 


8,510 


6,502 


6,091 


93.7 


3,182 


0.522 


1892 


9,120 


7,03.i 


6,608 


93.9 


3,181 


0.481 


1893 


9,632 


7,217 


6,790 


94.1 


3,375 


0.497 


1894 


9,387 


7,212 


6,840 


94.8 


3,000 


0.419 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



257 



TABLE 21. — MEMBERSHIP, ETC., OF HIGH SCHOOL 
FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 









Per cent of 




Per cent of 




Average 


Largest 


Average 


Number of 


j Average 


Year. 


Membership 


Number in 


Membership 


Graduates of 


Membership 




All Schools. 


High School. 


of all 
Schools. 


High School. 


of all 
Schools. 


1807 


2,157 


119 


5.51 


1 


32 


1808 


2,285 


141 


6.17 


17 


0.75 


I8(;i) 


2,480 


158 


6.37 


25 


1.01 


1870 


2,(139 


165 


6.25 


16 


0.65 


1871 


2,549 


161 


6.31 


33 


1.29 


1872 


2,799 


186 


6.64 


21 


0.75 


1873 


3,217 


190 


5.91 


28 


0.87 


1874 


3,265 


198 


6.06 


26 


0.79 


1875 


3,515 


213 


6.06 


31 


0.88 


187G 


3,712 


226 


6.09 


33 


0.81 


1877 


3,788 


227 


5.91 


•') 1 


0.98 


1878 


3.992 


250 


6.26 


31 


0.78 


1879 


4,169 


246 


5.90 


34 


0.82 


1880 


4,278 


254 


5.93 


27 


0.63 


1881 


4,064 


256 


6.29 


34 


0.84 


1882 


4,263 


280 


6.57 


33 


0.77 


1888 


4,438 


278 


6.26 


43 


0.97 


1884 


4,804 


315 


6.55 


46 


0.96 


1885 


4,904 


385 


7.85 


46 


0.94 


1886 


4,985 


374 


6.70 


56 


1.12 


1887 


5,198 


387 


7.44 


53 


1.02 


1888 


5,488 


435 


7.92 


60 


1.09 


1889 


5,956 


444 


7.45 


67 


1.12 


1890 


6,485 


487 


7.51 


60 


0.93 


1891 


6,502 


535 


8.23 


68 


1.05 


1892 


7,035 


577 


8.20 


80 


1.14 


1893 


7,217 


626 


8.67 


82 


1.14 


1894 


7,274 


691 


9.50 


111 


1.52 



258 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 22.— RESIGNATIONS OF TEACHERS, 1894. 



School. 


Teacher. 


Time of 
Resignation. 


In Service. 


High . 


Carrie E. Strong. 


Jan. 8. 


4 months. 


(( 








Mary M. Kingsbury. 


June 30. 


2 yrs., 4 mos. 


« 








Alice E. Sawtelle. 


June 30. 


1 jr., 5 mos. 


(( 








Bertha L. Brown. 


Sept. 1. 


2 yrs., 1 mo. 


« 








Mary A. Pratt. 


Nov. 26. 


1 yr. 


Bell 








S. Minnie Wiggins. 


June 30. 


2 yrs., 7 mos. 


Edgerly 








Emma L. Zeigler. 


March 26. 


2 yrs. 


Forster 








Helen A. Smith. 


March 26. 


1 yr., 4 mos. 


(( 








Cora F. Sanborn. 


Dec. 21. 


1 yr., 4 mos. 


Highlanc 








Agnes M. Ward. 


Nov. 26. 


1 yr., 11 mos. 


Knapp 








Harry N. Andrews. 


March 26. 


3 yrs., 7 mos. 


Morse 








Sarah S. Waterman. 


June 30. 


7 yrs. 


(( 








Amy C. Hudson. 


June 30. 


18 yrs. 


(( 








Stella Hall. 


Nov. 26. 


10 yrs. 


Pope 








Maria Miller. 


June 30. 


25 yrs. 


Davis 








Annie J. Richardson. 


Dec. 21. 


5 yrs. 


Jackson 








Annie W. Hatch. 


June 30. 


lyr. 


Beech Street 






Emma T. Tower. 


June 30. 


4 yrs. 


Harvard 






Carrie A. Fowle. 


March 26. 


1 yr., 7 mos. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



259 



TABLE 23. — TEACHERS ELECTED IN 1894. 



Schools. 


Teachers. 


Date. 


Salary. 


High .... 


Mary A. Pratt. 


January 29. 


$ 800 


<< 










Carrie A. Marsh. 


January 29. 


700 


(( 










Nellie S. Bakeman. 


May 28. 


750 


(I 










Florence H. Paul. 


September 24. 


800 


<< 










Florence K. Bailey. 


September 24. 


800 


« 










Esther Bailey. 


December 31. 


7.-)0 


Cummings 










Margaret L. Martin. 


January 29. 


400 


Knapp 










John S. Emerson. 


March 20. 


1,700 


Pope 










Charlotte S. Buck. 


September 24. 


000 


Forster 










Mary E. Bunton. 


March 20. 


600 


<( 










Ursula M. WiUard. 


June 25. 


400 


(( 










Irena S. Nightingale. 


December 31. 


000 


Bingham 










Mabel E. Mansir. 


January 29. 


350 


<( 










Elizabeth J. O'Neil. 


February 20. 


000 


<( 










Harriet M. Ward. 


June 2~). 


000 


Morse 










Genevieve Allen. 


June 2.">. 


675 


<( 










Adelaide F. Eaton. 


June 25. 


600 


Franklin 










Jennie A. Chapman. 


June 25. 


600 


Highland 










Alice L. Hayward. 


June 25. 


500 


Lincoln 










P'lora A. Burgess. 


Pebruary 20. 


000 


Durell 










Grace Bosworth. 


June 25. 


ooo 


(< 










Mary Winslow. 


June 25. 


000 


(( 










Edith L. Hunnewell. 


June 25. 


350 


Harvard . 










Grace B. Tibbetts. 


October 29. 


500 


Supervisor of ) 
Physical Training J 






Blanche A. Bemis. 


June 25. 


600 


Davis 






Lucia E. Estey. 


December 81. 


000 



TABLE 24.— TRANSFERS OF TEACHERS AS TO SCHOOLS. 



Teacher. 


From 


To 


Nora F. Byard .... 


Bingham. 


Durell. 


Ella M. Coops 






Franklin. 


Beech Street. 


Grace Emerson 






Forster. 


Lincoln. 


Carrie E. Fay 






Lincoln. 


Bingham. 


Harry F. Hathaway 






Lincoln. 


Bingham. 


Annie L. Savage . 




. 


Prospect Hill. 


Jackson. 


Ella F. Gould 






Morse. 


Forster. 


Lennie W. Bartlett 






Forster. 


Morse. 



(16) 



260 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 25. — TRANSFERS OF TEACHERS AS TO GRADES. 



Helen P. Bennett. 
Anna C. Damon. 
Gertrude L. Gardner. 
Harriet A. Hills. 
Gertrude C. Mason. 
Annie G. Sheridan. 
Addie E. Wentworth. 
Grace Emerson. 
Harry F. Hathaway. 
Nora F. Byard. 
Ella M. Coops. 



From Grade 4, 5 to Grade 6. 



i( 




4 


({ 


5. 


u 




6 


(( 


7. 


i( 




5 


'' 


6. 


ee 




3 


K 


4. 


(( 




3 


li 


4. 


ft 




6 


iC 


7. 


To prin 


cipalship 


of Lincoln 




a 


a 


a 


Bingham. 


a 


li 


a 


Durell. 




11 


a 


i( 


Beech Street. 



TABLE 26.— LEAVE OF ABSENCE OF TEACHERS. 



May 28. Addie S. Winnek, for one year. 
May 28. S. Adelaide Blood, for one year. 
Sept. 24. Anna E. Sawyer, for one year. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



261 



TABLE 27. — TIME LOST BY TEACHERS IN 1894. 





No. of 


Days 


Days per 


School. 


No. of 


Days 


Days per 


School. 


Teachers, 


Lost. 


Teacher. 


Teachers. 


Lost. 


Teacher. 


High . 


15 


46 


3.1 


1 

1 Curamings 


4 


14 


3.5 


Bell . 


13.6 


95.5 


7.0 


Davis 


4 


15 


3.8 


Edgerly 


13 


47.5 


3.7 


Durell 


4 


2.5 


0.6 


Forster 


13 


:)0.0 


4.3 


Eranklin . 


4 


48.5 


12.1 


Highland . 


13 


50 


3.8 


Lincoln 


4 


21.5 


5.4 


Knapp 


9.9 


2r, 


2.5 


Bennett 


3.3 


3.5 


1.0 


Morse 


13 


32 


2.5 


! Jackson 


3 


6.5 


2.2 


Pope . 


13 


95 


7.3 


Beech Street 


2 


9.0 


4.5 


Prescolt 


13 


36.5 


2.8 


Cedar Street 


2 


4.5 


2.3 


Bingham 


7.2 


29.5 


4.1 


Prospect Hill 


6 


10.5 


1.8 


Glines 


8 


21 


2.6 


Harvard 


1 


5.0 


5.0 


Burns 


4 


20.5 


5.1 


; Special 


! 5.4 

i 


19.5 


3.6 










Total . 


178.4 

i 


715 

1 
1 


4.0 



Per cent of Attendance of Teachers, 97.8 



TABLE 28. —NUMBER OF TEACHERS FOR A SERIES OF YEARS. 













Assistants 








Year. 


High 
School. 


Grammar 
School. 


Primary 
School. 


Special 
Teachers. 


not in 

charge of 

room. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


1885 


9 


63 


48 


> 

1 





10 


Ill 


121 


1886 


9 


62 


48 


1 





9 


111 


120 


1887 


10 


64 


48 


1 





9 


114 


123 


1888 


10 


66 


52 


4 


7 


9 


130 


139 


1889 


10 


60 


56 


4 


7 


10 


127 


137 


1890 


10 


78 


58 


5 


7 


12 


146 


158 


1891 


12 


86 


63 


5 


13 


12 


167 


179 


1892 


13 


90 


67 


5 


10 


12 


173 


185 


1893 


14 


88 


63 


5 


19 


12 


177 


189 


1894 


15 


91 


GQ 


6 


11 


12 


177 


189 



262 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Table 29. — TEACHERS OF THE HIGH SCHOOL SINCE 

ITS ORGANIZATION. 

Principals. 

Robert Bickford, 1852 to 1854. Isaac N. Beals, 1858-59. 
Leonard Walker, 1854 to 1856. Henry H. Babcock, 1859 to 1867. 
Samuel J. Pike, 1856 to 1858. George L. Baxter, 1867 

Sub- Masters. 
Walter F. Marston, 1871 to 1875. Luther B. Pillsbury, 1878-79. 

William S. Forrest, 1875 to 1878. Frank M. Hawes, 1879 

Junior Sub- Master. 

Charles T. Murray, 1887 

Assistants. 

Elizabeth C. Babcock, 1852-53. Eudora Morey, 1882 

Charlotte Gardner, 1853-54. 
Rebecca F. Ames, 1853-54. 
Maria A. Merriam, 1854 to 1856. 
Agnes GiUis, 1854 to 1856. 
Lucy A. Dudley, 1856 to 1858. 
Sarah E. Cushman, 1857. 
Lydia A. Pearce, 1857-58. 



Minnie C. Clarke, 1882 to 1887. 
Laura E. Giddings, 1882 to 1889. 
Frederic B. Hall, 1885. to 1887. 
Josephine H. Short, 1887 to 1892. 
Bessie R. White, 1887 to 1893. 
Lilia E. Smith, 1889-90. 
Mabell S. Clark, 1889 to 1891. 



George C. Brackett, 1858 to 1860. Annie E. French, 1891-92. 



Harriet E. Reed, 1860 to 1867. 
Harriet E. Guild, 1860-61. 
Elizabeth S. Owen, 1861-62. 
Sarah L. Graves, 1865 to 1882. 
Susan Osgood, 1867-68. 
Mary E. Davis, 1867 to 1875. 
f 1868 to 1873. 



Sarah W. Fox. 



(18 



iD 



Annette E. Long, 1869 to 1882. 

Julia A. Stetson, 1873 to 1879. 

Alfred Bunker, 1877-78. 

Frederic Farnsworth, 1879-80. 

Kate W. Gushing, 1880 to 1882. Florence K. Bailey, 1894 

Sarah F. Litchfield, 1880 to 1892. Nellie S. Bakeman, 1894 - 

Frances W. Kaan, 1882 — — Esther Bailey, 1895 

Whole number, 58. 



Mary M. Kingsbury, 1892 to 1894. 
Bertha L. Brown, 1892 to 1894. 

M. Isabel Goldthwaite, 1892 

Lena Gilbert, 1892 

Helen H. Wadsworth, 1892 

Alice E. Sawtelle, 1893-94. 

Grace A. TuttJe, 1893 

Mary A. Pratt, 1893-94. 
Carrie E. Strong, 1893. 
Grace Weston, 1893-94. 

Carrie A. Marsh, 1894 

Florence H. Paul, 1894 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 263 



Table 30. — CHANGES OR ADOPTIONS OF TEXT-BOOKS. 

Grades 4 AND 5 — Frye's Primary and Potter's New Elementary 
Geography in place of Barnes's and Harper's Geographies. 

Grade 9. — Thomas's United States History in place of Barnes's. 

Grade 3. — Scudder's Fable and Folk Stories. 

Grades 1 and 2. — The Cecilian, Part 1. Desk book. 

Grades 6, 7 Axb 8. — Potter's Advanced Geography. Desk book. 

Grades 4, 5 and 6. — Ricks's Object Lessons, First Series. Desk 
book. 

Grades 7, 8 and 0. — Ricks's Object Lessons, Second Series. Desk 
book. 

Grade 8. — Tilden's Commercial Geography. Desk book. 

Grade 9. — Appleton's Physical Geography. Desk book. 
Warren's Physical Geography. Desk book. 



Table 3L — GRADUATING EXERCISES OF CLASSES OF 1894. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



The forty-second annual exhibition of the High School occurred 
on Tuesday, June 26, at the first M. E. Church, in the presence of 
a large and interested audience. 

After the completion of the programme, His Honor, Mayor 
William H. Hodgkins, presented diplomas to the one hundred and 
eleven members of the graduating class. 



264 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ORDER OF EXERCISES 



PRAYER. Rev. G. W. Durell. 



Singing.* — Bridal Chorus : " The Rose Maiden." 



Cowen 



SALUTATORY IN LATIN. 



Francis P. Garland 



READING. The Angel and the Shepherds. Wallace 

Esther Shaw. 

Violin Solo : Religious Meditation. Eichberg 

Lottie G. Bowers. 

READING. My Clock. Jerome 

Charles H. Colgate, Jr. 

DER DAEMMERUNGSVEREIN. 
Georgina Crosby. Katharine L. Stebbins. 

Helen A. Eldridge. Ethel F. Tucker. 

Mabel L. Marston. Martha E. Vincent. 

Annie G. O'Connell. Mattie G. York. 

Maria Sandahl. 

Singing. — Trio (in canon) : "William Tell." Rossini 

Two-part Song : The Pilot. Millard 

(Male voices.) 



5. ESSAY. Ati Allegory. 

6. READING. Deacon Tubman's Race. 

Laura May Wellington. 

7. FROM "TROILUS AND CRESSIDA." 



Bessie F. Manning 
Murray 



Samuel P. Capen. 
Frederick H. Packard. ' 
Samuel G. Underhill. 



(Original Version in Greek.) 
Winifred G. Hill. 
Blanche M. Huse. 



Singing. — Semi-chorus : In Arcady. 

* Singing accompanied by Hadley's Orchestra. 



H. K. Hadley 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 265 

RECESS. 

Music. — Waltzes: Florida ( Land of Flowers ). H. K. Hadley 

Singing. — Recitative and Aria : Caro Nome. " Rigoletto.'' Verdi 
(Instrumentation by S. Henry Hadley. ) 
Evangeline Norwood. 

8. LES SEPT PECHES CAPITAUX. 

Annie M. de Almeida. Anna L. Hodgdon. 

Bessie A. Dadmun. Mabel G. Paul. 

Mabel G. Delano. Mary E. Tirrell. 

Mabel A. Fixz. L. H. Birmingham. 

Florence W. Gooding. D. Wilbur Bowie. 

Mabel A. Grant. Charles H. Tozier. 

9. BACCHUS AND THE FROGS. 

(Adapted from the Greek of Aristophanes.) 

Prologue, Maude L. Soule. Bacchus, Charles E. Lord. 
Queen, Ellen AL Griffin. With chorus of Frogs. 

10. CLASS POEM. Alice R. McGann 

Singing. — Bird Song. ( Female voices.) Taubert 

Chorus : Sleighing Song. H. K. Hadley 

11. READING. The Arena. Wallace 

Florence R. Conant. 

12. PROPHECIES. Percy F. Parsons 

13. VALEDICTORY. Edith A. W^inship 

14. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. 

By His Honor, Mayor WilliAxM H. Hodgkins. 

15. PARTING HYMN. Words and Music by Louis H. Birmingham 



266 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



MEMBERS OF THE GRADUATING CLASS. 



Elizabeth Maud Baldwin. 
Clara Hosmer Brown. 
Ethel Maude Chabot. 
Annie Elizabeth Chapman. 
Elizabeth Paine Chapman. 
Florence Winniefred Chase. 
Matie Juliette Connolly. 
Mary Delia Magdalene Cooney. 
Bessie Adelaide Dadmun. 
Kate May Dane. 
Sallie Harris Davenport. 
Matie Irene Dayfoot. 
Mabel Guild Delano. 
Susie Elizabeth Dewing. 
Katharine Alphonsus Diggihs. 
Helen Andrews Eldridge. 
Inez May Felt. 
Mabel Gertrude Fisher. 
Mabel Alice Fitz. 
Ada Belle Gilmore. 
Florence Wellington Gooding. 
Grace Mcintosh Gordon. 
Mabel Alice Grant. 
Rebecca Jennie Greene. 
Ellen May Griffin. 
Miriam Gunsenhiser. 
Anna Louise Hodgdon. 
Cora Isabel Howe. 
Mary Lilian Le Bosquet. 
Sophia Atkins Lombard. 
Bessie Frances Manning. 
Mabel Louise Marston. 
Katharine Mary McCarthy. 
Annie Frances McFadden. 
Alice Robinson McGann. 
Sarah Adelaide Merry. 



Grace Howard Morse. 
Evangeline Norwood. 
Annie Gertrude O'Connell. 
Mabel Gray Paul. 
Bertha Lord Pierce. 
Mabel Alberta Pettes. 
Maria Sandahl. 
Nannee May Sargent. 
Ada Belle Scales. 
Esther Shaw. 
Maude Lillian Soule. 
Annie Florence Stratton. 
Gertrude Evelyn Taylor. 
Mary Ellen Tirrell. 
Ethel Florence Tucker. 
Elizabeth Mabel Ward. 
Laura May Wellington. 
Mada Sevrens Wendell. 
Blanche Wheeler. 
Henrietta Louisa Yelland. 
Louis Howland Birmingham. 
Samuel Taylor Birmingham. 
David Wilbur Bowie. 
Arthur Abbott Clarke. 
Alvah Frank Dole. 
William Zobeskie Fleming. 
William Clark Hammond. 
James Henry Hunt. 
Franklin Conant Kendall. 
Charles Edward Lord. 
Thomas Miller, Jr. 
Henry Dudley Newell. 
Joseph William Ralph. 
Edwin Adams Shaw. 
Amos Worthen Shepard. 
Charles Herman Tozier. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



267 



Course Preparatory to College. 



Malcolm Campbell Anderson. 
Samuel Paul Capen. 
Charles Henry Colgate, Jr. 
Francis Paul Garland. 
Frederick Henry Packard. 
Percy Fowler Parsons. 
Leonard Holden Pote. 
Nathan Parker Reed. 
Herbert Richardson. 
John Fulton Stevens. 
Ralph Ricker Stratton. 
Coleman Tousey. 
Samuel Graham Underhill. 
Anna Mackay De Almeida. 
Edith May Barrows. 
Ethel Townsend Bartlett. 
Lottie Gertrude Bowers. 
Lilian Estelle Clark. 
Florence Reynolds Conant. 
Georgina Crosby. 



Florence Elizabeth Delano. 
Elsie Grace Hatchard. 
Clara Gertrude Hegan. 
Sarah Elizabeth Hight. 
Winifred Gertrude Hill. 
Ethel Gulliver Hodgkins. 
Blanche Manahan Huse. 
Mattie Louise Littlefield. 
Annie Maria Mahoney. 
Ruth Janet Macgregory. 
Josephine Lord Mitchell. 
Katharine Louise Stebbins. 
Harriet Alice Turner. 
Martha Edwards Vincent. 
Alice Lucretia Westgate. 
Grace Rowena White. 
Edith Annette Winship. 
Martha Edith Winslow. 
Mattie Gertrude York. 



268 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Table 32. — GRAMMER SCHOOL GRADUATES. 

The graduation exercises of the Grammer schools were held at 
the First M. E. Church, Union 'square, on Thursday evening, June 
28. Three hundred and eighty-nine graduates received diplomas at 
the hands of His Honor, Mayor Hodgkins. 

The following is the 

PROGRAMME. 

Part First. 

1. OVERTURE. ♦♦ A Morning, Noon and Night in Vienna." Stippe 

Hadley's Orchestra. 

2. *SINGING. Four-Part Song. " Night Song." Rheinberger 

3. PRAYER. 

Rev. Edward S. Tead. 

4. SINGING. Two-Part Song. " Wanderer's Evening Song." 

Rubinstein 

5. ADDRESS. 

Rev. Edward Everett Hale, D. D. 



Part Second. 

6. SINGING. Vocal Galop. " The Revel of the Leaves." Veazie 

7. ADDRESS TO GRADUATES AND PRESENTATION. 

OF DIPLOMAS. 

Mayor William H. Hodgkins. 

8. SINGING. Vocal March. " The May Day." H. K. Hadley 

* Singing accompanied by Hadley's Orchestra, under the direction of S. Henry Hadley, teacher 
of music in the schools. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



269 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 
Graduates. 



Annie Atkinson. 
Warren J. Baldwin. 
Mary E. Blood. 
William E. Bolton. 
William L. Bradford. 
Annie E. Callahan. 
Lillian V. Carver. 
Annie C. Clifford. 
Florence B. Cochran. 
Charlotte M. Coner. 
William F. Cutter. 
Bertha L. Day. 
Justin A. Duncan. 
Helen A. Fitzgerald. 
Alice S Frye. 
Frank W. Grimes. 
Walter M. Higgins. 
William N. Howard. 
Ethelyn L James. 
Gertrude A. Lanagan. 



Ethel M. Lord. 
Edith E. Ludwig. 
John Peck. 
Minnie E. Price. 
William A. Randall. 
Alfred S. Rich. 
Eva L. Simmons. 
Ethel M. Smith. 
Grace L. Smith. 
Persis J. Sylvester. 
Arden D. Webb. 
George C. Webb. 
Duncan Wemyss. 
Benjamin F'. Wessells. 
Marion R. White. 
Rebecca R. Whitman. 
Jennie D. Wilson. 
Herbert L. Young. 
William H. Young. 



LUTHER V. BELL SCHOOL. 



Charles M. Ambrose. 
Arthur M. Blake. 
William L Brown. 
Amelia Lucile Brownson, 
Allen Granger Chapin. 
Mabel Vesta Coney. 
Charles F. Cuddy. 
Lillian May Cuddy. 
Edna Belle Evans. 
Frank E. Fitts, Jr. 
Grace Iva Godfrey. 
Walter E. Harmon. 
James Henry Hegan. 
Alida J. Kaula. 
Arthur A. Kidder. 



Graduates. 



Ada Estelle Lawson. 

Francis H. Lord. 

Bradley Adams McCausland. 

Thomas F. McGann, Jr. 

Fred W. Miller. 

Jennie Almira Milner. 

Alexander Neeily. 

Henry J. T. Pring. 

Margaret M. Rice. 

Edna M. Snell. 

Malcolm E. Sturtevant. 

Donald Graves Tead. 

Effie H. Thorpe. 

Susan Coolidge Woodman. 



270 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Samuel A. Alcock. 
Lilla M. Alger. 
Dora B. Anderson. 
Bessie W. Bailey. 
Winogene Bennett. 
Willard C. Braden. 
Annie E. Bruce. 
William A. Burns. 
Clarence E. Gate. 
Wesley W. Coe. 
Frances G. Connell. 
Lucy M. Cunningham. 
Frederic M. Davis. 
Gladys M. Dueheana. 
Gertrude S. Dugan. 
Bertha L. Hale. 
William H. Hale. 
Susie L. Hammett. 
Elizabeth F. Hatchell. 
Florence G. Kendall. 
Florence Linnell. 



EDGERLY SCHOOL. 
Graduates. 

F. Gertrude Lowell. 
Bertha E. Lyman. 
Ethel A. Manthorne. 
Harry L. McPherson. 
Agnes G. Mooney. 
Sadie E. Nickerson. 
Victor O'Brien. 
Emma M. Petri. 
Maude F. Quinn. 
May A. Rich. 
Jennie E. Scott. 
Nelson C. Smith. 
Jennie L. Stentiford. 
Louis A. Taylor. 
James F. Tirrell. 
Lilla M. Walker. 
Gertrude J. Webber. 
Clarence W. Wentworth. 
Harry B. Wentworth. 
Joseph K. Wiswell. 

OREN S. KNAPP SCHOOL. 



Elizabeth M. Adams. 
Ralph Samuel Adams. 
Lida Bethia Belcher. 
Alice Irene Budden. 
Henry Maurice Cavanagh. 
Margaret Teresa Cavanagh. 
Ernest David Corliss. 
Fanny May Daniels. 
Charles C. Farnum. 
Arthur Melville Fillebrown. 
Maud Lee Hall. 
Bertha Haynes. 
Ray George Hoffses. 
M. Gertrude Killian. 
E. Gertrude Leighton. 
Joseph J. Manning. 



Graduates. 

Charles Henry McLaughlin. 
A. Maude McLean. 
Flora Morris. 
Thomas J. Mullen. 
John White Mulliken. 
Bessie Champney Olin. 
John William Quinn. 
George John Rauh. 
William John Roche. 
Leonard W. Rockwell. 
Patrick Francis Ryan. 
Margaret E. Simons. 
Joseph Leo Vincent. 
Charlotte S. Webb. 
. James E. L. White. 
Bessie Adelia Yerxa. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT, 



271 



Charles P. Abbott. 
Chester F. Adams. 
Clarence E. Baker. 
Herl^ert L. Barnard. 
Herbert A. Blake. 
Florence A. Bone. 
George W. Bone. 
Joseph E. Bowen. 
Charlotte I. Browne. 
Edna F. Burckes. 
Ella M. Burgess. 
Chester C. Burnham. 
William H. Butler. 
Leonard D. Chandler. 
Gertrude Cheney. 
Wallace J. Columbus. 
William T. Coveney. 
Bessie C. Crosby. 
Albert G. Crowley. 
William D. Crowley. 
Ruby H. Currier. 
Edna L. Gushing. 
Phillip G. Darling. 
jMattie L Desmond. 
Nellie T. Donovan. 
Nellie E. Drake. 
Charles A. Fitzpatrick. 
Alice P. French. 
Louise S. Frost. 
Mabel F. Fuller. 
Raymond Gage. 
Walter R. Gilbert. 
Jessie F. Grieves. 
Mabel G. Griffiths. 
Waldo D.Hallett. 
Annie M. Hammer. 
Matie L. Hardison. 
Addie C. Harlow. 
Fred R. Harlow. 
Fred E. Hilliard. 



FORSTER SCHOOL. 
Graduates. 

Guy R. Hilliard. 
Rubena M. B. Howard. 
Jennie L. Hutchinson. 
Lulu A. Jones. 
Mary T. Kennedy. 
Gustave A. Kuhn. 
Charles A. Lamont. 
Charlotte E. Leavitt. 
Minnie G. Leavitt. 
Agnes L McCoy. 
Bertha A. McCrillis. 
Annie L. McLaughlin. 
Catherine M. McLaughlin. 
Hector C. McLean. 
Mary A. Mooney. 
Ella F. Murdock. 
Jennifred M. Noble. 
Charlie L. Ogilvie. 
Minnie B. Palmer. 
Alfred B. Pearson. 
Royal K. Peirce. 
George E. Perkins. 
Amelia E. Piccott. 
Beaulia E. Porper. 
Mabel J. Powers. 
Lalia C. Raymond. 
Harry E. Sawtell. 
Frederick T. Scott. 
William C. Stephenson. 
George A. Stevens. 
Herbert E. Stone. 
Nellie T. Stone. 
Harry M. Stoodley. 
Helen V. Sutherland. 
Charles L Todd. 
Edgar P. Trott. 
Helen U. Waldron. 
Florence G. Williams. 
Eleanor J. Wingersky. 



272 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



MORSE SCHOOL. 



Graduates. 



Maude Bezanson. 
Mary Gertrude Blackwell. 
Alice Edna Brown. 
Helen Damon Carr. 
Mary Emily Carr. 
Charles D. Chase. 
William H. Christie. 
Harry Bickerton Clark. 
Florence Sydney B. Clarke. 
Janet A. Cowan. 
Mary Emma Cox. 
Louis F. Crowell. 
A. Gertrude Cummins. 
Gertrude May Currier. 
Mabel Katharine Davis 
Mabelle Catharine Deacon. 
John H. Densmore. 
Lillian French Dickinson. 
Louise H. Dickinson. 
Eda Florence Dolliver. 
Charles E. Dyer 
Adelaide R. Edmands. 
Charlotte Cordelia Eldridge. 
Hortense May Estes. 
Emma Goldthwaite Fenton. 
Charles Joseph Fulton. 
Arthur Hall Goodwin. 
Heathe L Gregory. 
Nora Frances Hailissy. 
Martha L. Haugh. 
Ida C. Hilt. 
Harry Garner Hooper. 
Lester H. Jackson. 



George F. Kendall, Jr. 
Marion C. Kendall. 
Margaret A. Lakin. 
Florence Jeannette Lewis. 
Daisy Mabelle Little. 
Sarah Eva Logan. 
Blanche Eugenie Lord. 
Clara Louise Macken. 
Agnes M. Moore. 
Agnes B. Morehouse. 
Mildred A. Nichols. 
Mabel Allen Nye. 
Herman E. Olsen. 
Edward Thomas O'Neil, Jr. 
Alice Maud Parrott. 
Emma Franklin Paul. 
Ethel Bennett Pitman. 
Etta Frances Pratt. 
Walter Ramsay. 
Carl R. Ringdahl. 
Winifred J. Roberts. 
Alice G. Sartwell. 
John J. A. Seitz. 
Isaac Edward Sexton. 
Michael F. Shea. 
Carrie A. Smith. 
Hubbard Vaughan Smith. 
Etta M. Thorpe. 
Charles Augustus Waterman. 
Frank R. Wheelock. 
William F. Willmann. 
Alfred William Woods. 
Fritz R. Zoeller. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



io 



HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 
Graduates. 



Rose A. BlackalL 
Bella M. Bland. 
Mabel F. Bossey. 
Sadie B. Bradshaw. 
Estelle Bray. 
Mae E. Brock. 
Horace R Brown. 
Ethel F. Browne. 
Mabelle F. Bryant. 
Josephine R. Burke. 
Lillian L Cameron. 
Horace A. Cammon. 
Ruth P Capen. 
Alvan W. Clark. 
Harry V. Clark. 
Frank E. Cleveland. 
Eva M. Colesworthy. 
John J. Comey. 
James W. Cronan. 
George B. Curtis. 
William R. Davis. 
William E. Dillon. 
Henry W. S. Downs. 
Lenora F. Downs. 
John K. Duhig. 
Laura M. Eastman. 
Esther Ericson. 
Irwin S. Felt. 
Effie M. Fife. 
Mabel P. Foster. 
Constance E. Freethy. 
Moses A. Gunsenhiser. 
Ruth M. Harmon. 
Harry T. Hartwell. 



Maggie V. V. Herrick. 
Bessie E. Howe. 
E. Louise Hunter. 
Josephine H. James. 
Fred K. Jones. 
George T. Jones. 
William W. Lea. 
Portia Lowe. 
Ida M. Lynam. 
Lizzie E. Marshall. 
Joseph K. McRae. 
Emma E. Mills. 
Charles H. Munger 
Franklin N. Parsons. 
Albert L. Pearson. 
Annie S. Peter. 
Maud K. Phinney. 
Wilbur J. Pierce. 
Frank J. Pushee. 
Harry N. Robbins. 
Florence A. Russell. 
Arthur L. Ryan. 
Caroline V. Sargent. 
Helen W. Skinner. 
Percy C. Smith. 
Ethel H. Sparrow. 
Vivian L. Stevens. 
Bertha W. Studley. 
Edna F. Thresher. 
Maud R. Tousey. 
Agnes K. Wallace. 
Clara L. Weitze. 
Robert R. White. 
Florence Young. 



274 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



CHARLES G. POPE SCHOOL. 

Graduates. 



Cornelius E. Ahern. 
Carl F. Ashton. 
Fred H. Ashton. 
Ellen G. Bowen. 
George H. Carter. 
William J. Casey. 
Edith G. Cross. 
Grace L. Doherty. 
Bernard D. Elkins. 
Annie E. Foley. 
Albert E. Gordon. 
James T. Heshion. 
John Higgens. 
Maria G. Kelly. 
Edward P. Lovering. 
Forrest S. Lunt. 
Mary Y. Martin. 
Albert J. Meserve, Jr. 



Florence E. Mitchell. 
John H. Murphy. 
William O. Packard. 
Walter H. Pearson. 
Jennie E. Perry. 
Joseph P. Phillips. 
Marion Pitman. 
John W. Ouinlan. 
Jennie L. Ray. 
Annie L. Regan. 
Percy E. RofFe. 
Margaret G. Rooney. 
Annie E. Sharkey. 
Walter K. Smith. 
Thomas M. A. Sweeney. 
Lillian J. Trenholm. 
Albert W. Wormwood. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



275 



TABLP: 33.— teachers in service DECEMBER, 1894. 

iCoLLEGE Graduate. 2Normal School Graduate. ^Somerville High School 

Graduate. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 









Beginning 


Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


ot 
Service. 


George L. Baxter i 


Principal 


j552,400 


1867 


Frank M. Hawes i 


Sub- Master 


2,000 


1879 


Charles T. Murray i 


Junior Sub-Master 


i,<;oo 


1887 


Sarah W. Fox 


Assistant 


1,200 


1808 


Prances W. Kaan 2 


( 




850 


1882 


Eudora Morey 2 


< 




850 


1882 


M. Isabel Goldthwaite i . 


( 




800 


181>3 


Grace A. Tuttle 2 


< 




800 


189:3 


Mrs. Lena Gilbert 


< 




800 


1893 


Helen H. Wadsvvorth i 


t 




800 


1893 


Carrie A. Marsh i 


( 




800 


1894 


Florence H. Paul i 


( 




800 


1H94: 


Florence K. Bailey i 


( 




800 


189-4 


Nellie S. Bakenian i 


< 




750 


189-i 



BELL SCHOOL. 









Beginning 


Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


of 
Service. 


F. W. Shattuck I 


Principal 


SI, 800 


1890 


May E. Berry 3 






IX 


675 


1880 


Emma F. Schuch 3 






VIII 


600 


1874 


Mary A. Bradford 






VII 


600 


1888 


Nellie S.Dickey 






VII 


600 


1889 


Vyra L. Tozier 2 






VI 


600 


1892 


Mabel T. Totman 






VI 


600 


1892 


Mary S. Rinn 3 






V 


600 


1889 


Ada F. Fernald 2 






V 


600 


1893 


Anna L. Alger 2 






IV 


600 


1891 


Edith J. Holden 2 . 






III 


. 600 


1893 


Martha E. Daniels 3 




II 


600 


1891 


Eliza L. Schuch 3 




I 


600 


1882 



(17) 



276 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



EDGERLY SCHOOL. 









Beginnins; 


Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


of '- 






, 


Service. 


Charles E. Brainard 


Principal 


^1,800 


1889 


Clara B. Cutler . 


IX 


675 


1892 


Annie L. Dimpsey 


VIH 


600 


1891 


Mary E. Richardson . 


VH 


600 


1893 


Gertrude L. Gardner 2 


vn 


600 


1889 


Mabel C. Mansfield 2 . 


VI 


600 


189.3 


Helen P. Bennett 2 . 


VI 


600 


1890 


Carrie Alma Colton 2 . 


V 


600 


1893 


Gertrude C. Mason 2 . 


IV 


600 


1893 


Alice M. Bearing 


III 


600 


1890 


Lillian Nealley 2 


II 


600 


1882 


Clara M. Bagley 


I 


600 


1873 


Martha M. Power 


I 


600 


1891 



rORSTER SCHOOL. 









Beginning 


Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


of 
Service. 


Fred C . Baldwui i 


Principal 


$1,800 


1893 


Elizabeth A. Page 2 . 


IX 


675 


1893 


Mrs. Cora F. Sanborn 2 


IX 


675 


1893 


Mary E. Bunton 


■VIII 


600 


1894 


Ella F. Gould . 


VII 


600 


1882 


Lizzie Frances Clement 


VI 


600 


1884 


Lucy K. Hatch 2 


V 


• 600 


1892 


Alice A. Batchelor 


IV 


600 


1877 


Ursula M. Willard 


III 


400 


1894 


Luetta M. Wescott 2 . 


III 


600 


1892 


Annie S. Gage 3 


II 


600 


1883 


Grace Shorey 2 


I 


500 


1892 


Harriet A. Brown 2 


I 


600 


1890 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



277 



HIGHLAND SCHOOL. 









Beginning 


Name. 


Grade. 


Salary-. 


of 
Senice. 


George E. AHchols i 


Principal 


^1,800 


1877 


M. Alice Paul 3 . 




IX 


675 


1879 


Jennie S. Wescott 2 






IX 


675 


1892 


Mabel A. Jepson 2 






VIII 


600 


1892 


Mrs. M. J. Bryant 






VIII 


600 


1894 


Annie R. Cox 2 . 






VII 


600 


1883 


Grace M. Clarke 2 






VI 


600 


1893 


Jennie C. Frazier 2 






V 


600 


1887 


Sarah E. Pray 3 






IV 


600 


1878 


Alice L. Hay ward 






III 


500 


1893 


Jennie M. Horner 3 






II 


600 


1888 


Gertrude Friend 2 




I 


600 


1893 


Kathenne E. Hourahan 2 




I 


500 


1892 



KXAPP SCHOOL. 



Name. 



Grade. 



Salary. 



Beginning 

of 
Service. 



John S. E»ierson 1 






Principal 


5L800 


1894 


Abby C. Hunt . 






IX 


675 


1873 


Emma Frve 2 






VIII 


600 


1891 


Clara B. Parkhurst 2 






VII 


600 


1889 


Nellie A. Hamblin 2 






VI 


600 


1882 


Clara B. Sackeit 2 






V 


600 


1891 


Annie E. Robinson 3 






IV 


600 


1876 


Nellie F. Sheridan 3 






IV 


600 


1888 


Abbie A. Gurnev 2 






III 


600 


1888 


Grace M. White 3 






II 


600 


1893 


L. Gertrude Allen 3 






II 


600 


1884 


Minnie A. Perrv 2 






I 


600 


1891 


Lucia Alger 2 






I 


600 


1889 



278 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



MORSE SCHOOL. 









Beginning 


Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


of 
Service. 


Miss Alina J. Wendell 


Principal 


^1,700 


1882 


Genevieve Allen . 


IX 


675 


1894 


Pauline S. Downes 


vni 


600 


1872 


Lennie W. Bartlett 


VII 


600 


1893 


Addie E. Wentworth 2 


VII 


600 


1893 


Adelaide F. Eaton 


VI 


600 


1894 


Charlotte Duguid 


V 


600 


1894 


Mary A. Haley . 


V 


600 


1867 


Lizzie E. Hill 2 . 


IV 


600 


1891 


Helen M. Mead 2 


III 


600 


1893 


Ella P. McLeod . 


II 


600 


1888 


Annabel M. Perry 3 . 


I 


600 


1891 



POPE SCHOOL. 









Beginning 


Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


of 

Service. 


George M. Wadsi<jorth I 


Principal 


$1,800 


1891 


Florence A. Chaney 


IX 


675 


1892 


Harriet M. Clark 2 




VIII 


600 


1893 


Alice I. Norcross 






VII 


600 


1885 


Frances A. Wilder 






VI 


600 


1874 


Lizzie W. Parkhurst 






V 


600 


1885 


Carrie E. Cobb . 






V 


600 


1887 


Jeannette M, Billings 






IV 


600 


1892 


Annie G. Sheridan 2 






IV 


600 


1886 


Charlotte S. Buck 2 






HI 


600 


1894 


Lillian C. Albee 






II 


600 


1888 


Lydia E. Morrill 3 






I 


600 


1892 


Maizie E, Blaikie 3 






I 


600 


1891 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



279 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 









Beginning 


Name, 


Grade. 


Salary-. 


ot 
Service. 


Safnuel A. yohnson i 


Principal 


« 
$1,800 


1893 


Anna M. Bates 2 


IX 


700 


187-4 


Adelaide Reed 2 


VIII 


650 


1877 


E. M. Gate 


VII 


600 


1882 


A. A. Anderson . 


VI 


600 


1878 


Amelia I. Sears 2 


VI 


600 


1873 . 


Catherine T. Brown 3 


V 


600 


1868 


Grace L. Shaw . 


V 


600 


1892 


Clara Taylor 3 . 


IV 


600 


1871 


Sarah E. Pratt 2 


III 


600 


1877 


E. M. Plummer . 


II 


600 


1877 


Louise E. Pratt 3 


III 


600 


1889 


Sarah W. Turner 2 


I 


600 


1893 



BINGHAM SCHOOL. 









Beginning 


Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


ot 

Service. 


Harry F. Hathaway 2, Principal 


VII VI 


$1,000 


1890 


Carrie E. Fay i . 


V 


600 


1889 


Elizabeth J. O'Neil 2 . 


V 


600 


1894 


Harriet M. Ward 2 


IV 


600 


1894 


Maude L. Kent , 


III 


600 


1893 


Ruby A. Johnson 2 


II 


600 


1892 


Belle J. Tifft 2 . . . 


I 


600 


1892 


Mabel E. Mansir 3 


I 


850 


1891 



280 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



GLINES SCHOOL. 









Beginning 


Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


ol 
Service. 


Mary E. Nortkup, Principal 


VIII 


^1,000 


1878 


Mary E. Stiles 2 


VII 


675 


1883 


M. Frances Guptill 


VI 


600 


1869 


Nellie A. Boynton 2 . 


V 


600 


1891 


Margaret A. Orr 2 


IV 


600 


1891 


Mary A. Goddard 


III 


600 


1893 


Florence E. Baxter 3 . 


II 


500 


1891 


Emma Burckes 3 


I 


600 


1890 



BURNS SCHOOL. 



Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


Beginning 

of 

Service. 


Laura J. Brooks, Principal 
Minnie S. Turner 3 
Annie L. Brown 
Florence M. Hamlin 3 


IV 
III 
II 

I 


^675 
600 
600 
600 


1883 
1885 
1885 
1889 



CUMMINGS SCHOOL. 



Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


Beginning 

of 

Service. 


Lydia J. Page 3, Principal 
Fannie L. Gwynn 2 
Lena B. Blaikie 3 
Margaret L. Martin 


IV 

III 
II 
I 


^675 
600 
500 
400 


1869 
1886 
1893 
1893 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



281 



DAVIS SCHOOL. 



Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


Beginning 

of 
Service. 


Mrs. L. A. Burns, 2, Principal 
Annie J. Richardson . 
Carrie T. Lincoln 3 
Priscilla A. Merritt 2 . 


IV 
III 

II 

I 


$675 
600 
500 
600 


1882 
1889 
1893 

1885 



DURELL SCHOOL. 



Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


Beginning 

of 
Service. 


Nora F. Byard 3, Principal 
Grace Bosworth 2 
Edith L. Hunnewell 2 
Mary Winslow 


IV 
III 
II 

I 


$675 

600 

350 
600 


1884 
1894 
ls9-t 
1893 



FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 



Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


Beginning 

of 
Service. 


Harriet A. Hills 3, Principal 
Jennie A. Chapman 2 . 
Anna C. Damon 2 
Caroline S. Plimpton . 


VI 
VII 

\' 
II 


$675 
600 
600 
600 


187-i 
1894 
1879 
1859 



282 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



LINCOLN SCHOOL. 



Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


Beginning 

of 
Service. 


Grace Emerson 2, Principal 
Flora A. Burgess 2 
Charlotte F. Mott 
Eliza H. Lunt 


VII VI 
V IV 

III II 
I 


^700 
600 
600 
600 


1892 
1894 

1886 
1890 



4 



BENNETT SCHOOL. 



4 



Name 


Grade. 


Salary. 


Beginning 

of 
Service. 


Mary B. Smith, Principal . 
Isadore E. Taylor 3 . 
Miriam Cavanagh 3 . 


Ill 

II 

I 


^675 
600 
400 


1885 
1883 
1893 



JACKSON SCHOOL. 



Name. 


Grade. 


Salary, 


Beginning 

of 

Service. 


Annie E. McCarty 3, Principal 
Annie E. Crimmings 3 
Annie L. Savage 2 


Ill 
II 
I 


1675 
600 
600 


1880 
1884 
1873 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



283 



PROSPECT HILL SCHOOL. 



Name. 


Grade. 


Salai-y. 


Beginning 

of 

Service. 


Helen Tincker 2, Principal 
Blanche Seabury 2 


V 

Kg. 


$800 

500 


1872 
1802 



BEECH STREET SCHOOL. 



Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


Beginning 

of 
Service. 


Ella M. Coops ^ Principal 
Florence B. Ashley 3 . 


HI 
I 


5025 
GOO 


1802 

1887 



CEDAR STREET SCHOOL. 



Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


Beginning 

of 
Service. 


Lizzie A. Davies, Principal 
M. E. Lacy 3 . . . 


IV III 

II I 


$625 

500 


1803 
1800 



HARVARD SCHOOL. 




284 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SPECIAL TEACHERS. 



Name. 


Grade. 


Salary. 


Beginning 

of 

Service. 


MUSIC. 








S. Henry Hadley 
Mrs, Gish Garwood 


9 — 6 
5 — 1 


^l,333t 
800* 


1869 
1891 


DRAWING. 








Augusta L. Balch 


9 — 1 


900* 


1891 


SEWING. 








Mrs. Charlotte M. Coffin . 
Mary L. Boyd 


7 — 4 
7 — 4 


600 
600 


1888 
1888 


PHYSICAL TRAINING. 








Blanche A. Bemis 


9 — 1 


600* 


1894 



'For three days' service. fFor four daj^s' service. 



ASSISTANTS IN SERVICE DECEMBER, 1894. 




SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



285 



34. — AMENDMENTS TO THE RULES 

OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, ADOPTED SINCE 1891. 

CHAPTER I. 

Section 2. {Additiofiai.) To the list of Standing Committees is 
added one "on the English High School." 

CHAPTER IV. 

Section j. {Additional.) The Committee on P'inance shall ex- 
amine and approve the pay-rolls of all bills passed by the Board. 

Section u. {Additional.) The Committee on Salaries shall ex- 
amine the pay-rolls of salaries of all persons in the service of the 
School Committee and approve such as are found correct. 

CHAPTER VI. 

Sectio7i I. Changed so that Teachers and Truant Officers are to 
be elected at the April meeting of the Board, 

Section 7. The district committees may at their discretion appoint 
assistant teachers in the primary and grammar schools having an 
average of over bQ pupils. 

Assistant teachers in primary and grammar grades, without experi- 
ence or Normal training, are paid for the 

First year ....... Nothing 



Second year 


. 


S200 


Third year 


. 


275 


Fourth year 


. 


350 


Fifth and subsequent years . 


. 


425 


Normal school graduates acting 


as assistants 


in primary or 


grammar grades are paid for the 






First vear .... 


. 


S275 


Second vear 


. 


350 


Third and subsequent years 


. 


425 



286 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

An experience of at least 30 weeks shall be required to constitute 
a year's work. 

Section 7. When an assistant who is not a Normal graduate be- 
comes a regular teacher during the first or second year of service she 
shall receive ........ $300 

During the third year of service .... 350 

During the fourth year of service . . . 400 

During the fifth or any subsequent year of service 500 

When an assistant who is a Normal graduate becomes a regular 

teacher during the first or second year of service she shall 

receive ......... $350 

During the third year of service .... 425 

During the fourth or any subsequent year of service 500 

No assistant shall receive the maximum salary of $600 as a regular 
teacher until she has served at least one year in the latter capacity. 

Section 8. Salaried assistants shall receive no increase of pay for 
substituting. 

In determining the pay of assistants or substitutes a single year at 
a Normal school shall be considered equivalent to a year of teaching 
experience. 

In determining the pay of a substitute or of a regular teacher, 
graduation at a Normal school shall be considered equivalent to a 
year of teaching experience. 

Section g. Form of teacher's certificate of election. 



; s^^ i 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 287 

CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 

School Department. 

.189 . 

M 

At a meeting of the Board of School Committee held 

180 , you were elected a teacher in the 

School, under the General Regulations of 

the Public Schools of Somerville, for the year ending June 30, 180 , 
at an annual salary of dollars. 

Should you decide to leave the service of the City before the erid 
of the period for which you have been elected, a four weeks' notice 
of your intention will be expected. 

Please fill the blanks below, affix your signature, detach the paper 
along the perforated line, and send it to the Secretary of the Board. 
If not received by him within ten days from date, the position will be 
considered vacant. 

Respectfully, 

Secretary of the Board of School (Committee. 

To the Board of School Committee of the City of So7nerville : 

Gentlemen, — I accept the position of teacher in the 

School, to which I was elected on the 

day of 189 , under the Gen- 
eral Regulations of the Public Schools of Somerville, for the year 
ending June 30, 189 , at an annual salary of 

dollars. 

It is my present expectation to continue in the service of the City 
to the end of the period for which I have been elected. 

Signature, 



288 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



AMENDMENTS TO THE GENERAL REGULATIONS 

OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 
CHAPTER I. 

Section j. April 19 is substituted for Fast Day as a school holiday. 

Section 5. The Superintendent, at his discretion, may dismiss the 
schools when the weather is unsuitable. 

The number 5 — 5 will be struck twice on the fire-alarm bells to 
indicate the omission of the next session of the schools, as follows : — 

High Schools. — From April to November at 7. From November 
t® April at 7.30. 

Primary Schools. — At 8.05, 1L45, or 1. During November, 
December and January at 12.45 instead of 1. 

Grammar Schools. — At 8.15, 11.45, or 1.15. During November, 
December and January at 1 instead of 1.15. 

The morning signal shall be for the omission of the morning 
session only. 

CHAPTER II. 

Sectio7i g. {Additional.') Principals of schools containing the 
Ninth grade shall be known as "Supervising Principals." They shall 
perform all the duties of principals as set forth elsewhere in these 
regulations. In addition to these duties they shall, at the request of 
the Superintendent, instruct classes, examine and grade pupils, and 
supervise the instruction of teachers in their own schools and in all 
other schools which are tributary to them. 

Whenever a school is tributary to two or more higher schools it 
shall be under the charge of the Senior Supervising Principal, unless 
otherwise ordered by the District Committee. 

Supervising Principals shall teach at least 12 hours per week, not 
ess than 10 of which shall be in the highest grade. 

Chapter V. The Middlesex County Truant School at Chelmsford 
is made the place of detention for truants by change in the city 
ordinances. 

Chapter VI. is rendered nugatory by a change in the city 
ordinances. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 289 



3^. — MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL LEGISLATION 

OF 1893 AND 1894. 



Chapter 108. — Resolve to provide for the codification of certain 
statutes which the inspection department of the district police is 
required to enforce. 

Attention is called to these points : — 

1. Section 7, chapter 48, of the Public Statutes, which appears 
among the school laws as published in 1892, is not in force. 

2. The provisions of sections 24, 25, and 70, chapter 508, of the 
Acts of 1894, do not appear in the school laws as published in 1892. 
These sections read as follows : — 

Section 24.. No person shall employ or permit to be employed a 
minor under 14 years of age, or over, who cannot read and write in 
the English language, and who resides in a city or town in this Com- 
monwealth wherein public evening schools are maintained, and is not 
a regular attendant of a day school, or has not attained an attendance 
of 70 per cent, or more of the yearly session of the evening school. 

Sectioti 25. Whenever it appears that the labor of any minor who 
would be debarred from employment under section 24 of this Act, is 
necessary for the support of the family to which said minor belongs, 
or for his own support, the school committee of said city or town may 
in the exercise of their discretion, issue a permit authorizing the em- 
ployment of such minor within such time or times as they may fix : 
provided, such minor makes application to said school committee, or 
some person duly authorized by said committee, for such a permit 
before the opening of the yearly session of the evening school of said 
city or town ; and the provisions of said section 24 shall not apply to 
such minor so long as said permit is in force ; provided, also, that if 
such minor has been prevented by sickness or injury from attending 
said evening school, as provided in said section, the school committee 
shall issue to such minor the permit provided for in this section, upon 
the presentation of the following blank properly filled and signed : — 



290 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

To the School Cojnmittee of the 

I hereby certify that I have attended from to ; 

that said was sick or injured with ; and that said 

was not in suitable physical condition to attend evening school for the term 
of days. (Signed) 

(Dated) 

Section yo. Any person who employs or permits to be employed 
a minor in violation of the provisions of section 24 of this Act, shall for 
each offence forfeit not less than fifty nor more than one hundred 
dollars for the use of the evening schools of such city or town. 

3. The age and schooling certificate required by chapter 508 of 
the Acts of 1894 must certify to an attendance of 30 weeks instead of 
20 weeks, as required by the law of 1888. 

Chapter 208. — An Act authorizing cities and towns to provide free 
evening lectures. 

Section i. The school committees of cities and towns maintain- 
ing free evening schools are hereby authorized to employ competent 
persons to deliver lectures on the natural sciences, history and kindred 
subjects, in such places as said committees may provide. 

Section 2. Said committees are hereby authorized to provide cards 
or pamphlets giving the titles and names of authors of books of 
reference, contained in the local public libraries, on the subject-matter 
of said lectures. 

1894. 

Chapter 151. An Act relating to vivisection and dissection in the 
public schools. 

Section i. No teacher or other person employed in any public 
school of this Commonwealth shall, in the presence of any scholar in 
said school or any child or minor there present, practise vivisection, 
nor, in such presence, exhibit any animal upon which vivisection has 
been practised. 

Section 2. Dissection of dead animals or of any portions thereof, 
in the public schools of this Commonwealth, shall in no instance be 
for the purpose of exhibition, but shall be confined to the classroom 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 291 

and to the presence of pupils engaged in the study to be illustrated by 
such dissection. 

Section j. Any person violating the provisions of this Act shall 
be punished by a fine of not less than ten nor more than fifty dollars. 

Chapter 188. — An Act relating to school attendance and truancy. 

Section i. Every person having under his control a child between 
the ages of eight and fourteen years, and, in cities and towns where 
industrial training is taught, between the ages of eight and fifteen years, 
shall annually cause such child to attend some public day school in 
the city or town in which he resides, for at least 30 weeks if the schools 
are kept open that length of time, with an allowance of two weeks' 
time for absences not excused by the superintendent of schools or the 
school committee ; such period of attendance shall begin within the 
first month of the Fall term of school, and for each five days of absence 
of any such child thereafter, in excess of the above allowance, before 
the completion of the required annual attendance of 30 weeks, the 
person having such child under his control shall, upon the complaint 
of the school committee or any truant officer, forfeit to the use of the 
public schools of such city or town a sum not exceeding twenty 
dollars ; but if such child has attended for a like period of time a 
private day school approved by the school committee of such city or 
town, or if such child has been otherwise instructed for a like 
period of time in the branches of learning required by law to be taught 
in the public schools, or has already acquired the branches of learning 
required by law to be taught in the public schools, or if his physical or 
mental condition is such as to render such attendance inexpedient or 
impracticable, such penalty shall not be incurred. 

Section 2. (This repeals everything inconsistent with section 1.) 
The provisions of section 1 of this Act have been incorporated in 
section 1 of chapter 498, Acts of 1894. In the codification the words 
*' cities and towns where industrial training is taught " are omitted 
from the second and third lines, and in their stead are the words 
^' every city and town where opportunity is furnished, in connection 
with the regular work of the public schools, for gratuitous instruction 
in the use of tools or in manual training, or for industrial education in 
any form, a child." In all other respects the language remains un- 
changed. 
(18) 



292 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Chapter 320. — An Act relating to instruction in the itse of tools and 
in cooking in public schools. 

This Act provides that the use of tools and the art of cooking shall 
be taught, by lectures or otherwise, in all the public schools in which 
the school committee deem it expedient, and that wherever such in- 
struction is given the tools, implements and materials required for 
such instruction may be purchased by the school committee at the 
expense of the city or town, and loaned to pupils, free of charge, sub- 
ject to such rules as the committee may prescribe. 

Chapter 471. — An Act to provide for fuanual training in cities and 
ioiv7is of more than twenty thousand inhabitants. 

After the first* day of September in the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-five, every city of twenty thousand or more inhabitants shall 
maintain as part of its High School system the teaching of manual 
training. The course to be pursued in said instruction shall be sub- 
ject to the approval of the State Board of Education. 

Chapter 515. — An Act relative to vaccinatioji. 

Section 2 of this Act provides that ^' all children who shall present 
a certificate signed by a regular practising physician that they are unfit 
subjects for vaccination shall not be subject to the provisions of section 
nine of chapter forty-seven of the Public Statutes excluding unvacci- 
nated children from public schools." 



SCHOOL DEPAR'JT^IEXT. 293 



36. — RULES FOR SCHOOL JANMTORS 

ADOPTED BY THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY, 

1894. 

1. It shall be the duty of janitors to open and close their build- 
ings every school day during the year. 

2. To sweep the entries and stairways daily, after the last session 
of the school ; the rooms, by Wednesday night, and again on Saturday 
of each week. The yards, out-houses, and basement are to be kept 
clean and in good order. The sanitaries flushed every day and left 
clean at night. Dust the furniture daily; the windows, blinds, walls 
and ceilings as often as necessary to keep them free from dust. 

3. To clean the doors, wainscoting, and all other wood work, in- 
cluding seats and desks, during the summer vacation. The windows 
shall be thoroughly cleaned, outside and inside, three times in each 
year; once in the month of May, August, and October. The tran- 
soms, windows, and other glass inside of the building must be kept 
clean. The ink-wells shall be cleaned five times in each year, once 
in the months of August, November, February and May, and once at 
the request of the Principal, or five times in each year other than those 
stated above, at the request of the Principal. 

4. To build fires when necessary, in season to have the rooms 
warmed to such temperature as the school committee shall direct at 
the time for opening the schools. Where stoves are used, fuel sufficient 
for the day must be carried to the several rooms. 

5. To use the fuel economically. To screen the ashes and use 
the screenings on the fires. 

6. To remove the ashes and all other debris from the cellars in 
order that the ashes and debris can be collected by the city once a 
week. 

7. To remove the snow and ice from the door- steps and walks 
eading to the gates and outbuildings. 

8. To keep the ice upon the sidewalks about the school buildings 
covered with ashes or sand. 



294 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

9. To keep the grounds about the school buildings free from 
weeds and litter of all kinds ; also to sweep and keep clean all brick 
and concrete walks within the school limits. 

10. Janitors of buildings heated by steam, or where there is 
any steam or hot water plant used for any purpose within the school- 
house or out-buildings, will be held responsible for the safety of the 
pipes from freezing. In extremely cold weather they must take unusual 
precautions, either by remaining during the night or until satisfied of 
the safety of the apparatus. 

11. Janitors of buildings where furnaces are used shall remain by 
them while the draft-doors are open. It is not required that fires 
should be kept upon holidays, or during vacation, except enough to 
protect the apparatus, and also prevent damage being done by 
freezing. 

12. Boilers shall be blown clean as often as once a month, and 
the tubes cleaned once each week. The safety-valve should be 
tried occasionally, and all other valves looked after and kept 
properly packed. Ashes shall be drawn from under the boilers and 
furnaces each day. 

13. Janitors shall maintain a general supervision of the estates 
during vacation. When workmen are employed in the premises, or 
when fuel is received, they shall see that none of the property in the 
building is misused, and they will be held responsible for any property 
stolen, or damage done through their negligence. 

14. Janitors are not required to act as messengers for Principals, 
or other instructors, but it is expected that they will be obliging in 
this respect, and that teachers will be considerate in requesting such 
service. 

15. Substitutes for janitors must be approved by the Committee on 
Public Property. 

16. Should the janitor neglect to perform his duty, the Principal, 
or other authorized instructor will notify the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings. If there is a continued neglect on the part of any janitor 
to perform his duties, the Superintendent of Public Buildings will 
report said janitor to the Committee on Public Property. 

17. Janitors of all eight and twelve-room schools, in addition to 
the time required for the performance of regular duties, shall be in at 
tendance at their buildings one-half hour before the opening of the 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 295 

regular session, and remain one-half hour after the regular afternoon 
session, or as late as half-past four in the afternoon. 

18. Janitors of other buildings will give as much of their time, 
in addition to the time required for the performance of their regular 
duties, as the Committee on Public Property shall direct, and must 
report to the Principal at some time during the school session of each 
day. 

19. They will open their buildings evenings for school purposes 
and have them properly warmed when requested by the Superintend- 
ent of Schools, ^id at such other times as the Committee on Public 
Property may direct. They will remain in their buildings during the 
evening session, and before leaving, see that the buildings are secure 
against fire, and securely lock the windows and doors through which 
access may be obtained to the buildings. 

20. It is understood that janitors in the performance of their duties 
are under the direction of the Superintendent of Public Buildings, and 
the Principals of the respective schools. 

THOMAS R. ROULSTONE, 

Superintendent of Public Buildings. 



296 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



37. — BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 

OF CITIZENS OF SOMERVILLE AFTER WHOM 
SCHOOLS HAVE BEEN NAMED. 

Charles Forster was born in Charlestown, June 13, 1798, and 
died there September 1, 1866. He was engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits until 1856, when he retired from active busmess. 

He held many public offices in Charlestown, and was the Repre- 
sentative in the Legislature at the time the Convent was burned. 

In 1845 he removed to Somerville and lived until 1863 at the 
corner of S3^camore street and Broadway. As a citizen of Somerville 
he was always interested in the public welfare. The city is largely 
indebted to him for the trees which now adorn the streets of Winter 
Hill. In 1854 the Forster School was named in his honor. One who 
knew him well said of him — " He occupied a place second to none 
in the hearts and affections of the people of Somerville, and left behind 
him a reputation which any man might envy — the reputation of a 
man who, by the purity of his life and character, his sweetness and 
kindliness of disposition, his unostentatious benevolence, the years of 
a long life devoted to charity towards the poor and suffering, had 
endeared himself to all who knew him, and grown deep into their 
hearts." 

Luther V. Bell, M. D., LL. D,, was born in Chester, N. H., 
December 20, 1806. He was graduated from Bowdoin College before 
he had finished his seventeenth year. He received his medical degree 
from the Hanover Medical School. He early distinguished himself in 
the practice of his profession, particularly in surgery and in the treat- 
ment of the insane. 

In January, 1837, he entered upon his duties as Superintendent of 
the McLean Asylum for the Insane, and for 20 years conducted the 
institution with rare ability and success. He was everywhere acknowl- 
eged as an authority on all questions connected with his profession. 

He was always interested in whatever affected the welfare of Som- 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 297 

erville, and was chairman of the School Board from 1843 to 1847. 
In 1850 he was a member of the Executive Council, in 1852 a candi- 
date for Congress, and in 1856 for the office of Governor. 

In 1856, in consequence of failing health, he retired from the 
McLean Asylum, and thenceforward resided in Charlestown. 

In 1861, animated by an intense love of country, notwithstanding 
his feeble health, he offered his services to the State, and was commis- 
sioned as surgeon of the 11th Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers. 
He engaged immediately in active service, being soon promoted to 
the post of Brigade Surgeon, and finally to that of Division Surgeon. 
As a result of exposure and the rigors of the service, after a brief ill- 
ness, he died February 11, 1862. 

''Thus, quietly and without ostentation, a life devoted to the cause 
of humanity and science was beautifully finished by a death in the 
service of his country." 

By vote of the School Board on March 1, 1862, the primary 
school on Cherry street was named the L. V. Bell School in his 
memory. 

In 1867 this school was closed, and in 1874 the school on Vinal 
avenue was named the Luther V. Bell School in his honor. 

Charles Sprague Lincoln was born in Walpole, N. H., April 20, 
1826. He was graduated from Harvard University in 1850. He 
taught school for a while after graduation, coming to Somerville for 
the purpose in 1852. He was admitted to the bar in 1860. He was 
Selectman and Solicitor for the town for many years. He served on 
the School Committee of Somerville from 1858 to 1867, and again 
from 1877 to 1883. He has twice represented the city in the Legis- 
lature and rendered valuable service on the Boards of Health and of 
Overseers of the Poor. The public library owes much of its success 
and development to his efforts as trustee. In his long career as a 
public official, during a residence of 40 years, he has contributed 
greatly to the prosperity of the city, and has won the respect and 
gratitude of his fellow-citizens by the honesty, the ability, and the 
fidelity displayed in the management of the trusts committed to his 
care. 

In 1866 the Lincoln School, then located on Elm street, and now 
on Clarendon Hill, was named in his honor. 



298 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Clark Bennett was born in Londonderry. Vt., Nov. 3, 1810. 
His ancestors were among the early settlers of Groton, Mass. His 
grandfather, David, early joined the Continental army, and served 
in the siege of Boston. Mr. Bennett was the eldest son of nine 
children. 

When he was 21 years old he settled in Somerville, then Charles- 
town, where for 25 years he successfully carried on the brick business, 
then a leading industry of the town. Later he followed the insurance 
business. 

Mr. Bennett's actions on all public matters requiring his attention 
were controlled by a conscientious desire to do right, as well as a full 
knowledge of the requirements, present and future, of our growing 
city. The abatement of the Miller's River nuisance, the inauguration 
of an excellent sewerage system, more especially for West Somerville, 
the widening and grading of Somerville avenue, and the construc- 
tion of the public Park, all bear witness to his unremitting efforts to 
place Somerville on a par with her sister cities. 

The record of Mr. Bennett's official service includes 11 years 
on the School Committee, a part of the time its chairman, the town 
treasurership, and three years' service on the Board of Aldermen. 

Mr. Bennett died Jan. 6, 1882. 

The Bennett School was named in his honor by vote of the School 
Board, April 8, 1868. 

Enoch R. Morse was born in Attleboro, July 25, 1822. He 
established himself in business in Boston in 1839, removing to 
Somerville in 1852. 

He took an active part in town affairs and was elected a member 
of the School Board in 1864. He held the position nine years, until 
after the incorporation of the city, and by his literary attainments 
and business experience was influential in promoting the educational 
interests of the town. He represented the city in the Legislature 
in 1876. 

So highly were his services appreciated by the town government 
that his name and memory were perpetuated in the Morse Grammar 
School, erected in 1869 on Summer street, while on the records of 
four other schools he appears as having been chosen to deliver the 
poem at the dedicatory exercises. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 299 

John S. Edgerly was born November 30, 1804, at ^Meredith, 
N. H., and like many another, early left his home in the country to 
get a better living in the city of Boston. About 1836 he moved to 
Winter Hill, then a part of Charlestown. He was always interested in 
public affairs, and was one of five who were instrumental, by their 
earnest zeal, in having what is now Somerville set off from Charlestown 
as a separate town. He was for 14 years one of the Board of Select- 
men and most of that time its chairman. 

He served on the School Board and as an Overseer of the Poor in 
those early days, and '' no night was too dark or road too bad for him 
to fail to start with his lantern and shovel to break out any place that 
his horse could not go through, whenever there was need." 

He died January 20, 1872. The Edgerly School, named in his 
honor, was established in 1871. 

Joshua H. Davis was born at Truro, November 4, 1814. He was 
educated in the schools of his native town and at the Teachers' Semi- 
nary, Andover, graduating in 1838. From 1840 to 1854 he was Prin- 
cipal of the Truro Academy, resigning on account of failing health. 
He was afterward secretary of the United States Insurance Company 
for nine years. In 1854 he took up his residence in Somerville, and 
was for 25 years identified with the educational interests of our city. 
He was a member of the School Board for three years and was elected 
Superintendent of Schools in 1866, a position which he filled with 
great ability for 22 years. He resigned in 1888, honored and beloved 
by the entire city. He was a member of the Legislature in 1889 
and 1890. 

No man has had greater influence in shaping and elevating our 
public school system, or has rendered more efficient service in pro- 
moting the educational, the moral, and the religious interests of our 
people. The purity and nobleness of his character as a christian 
gentleman endear him to the thousands who have known him in pri- 
vate and in public, and make his life an inspiration and a model. 

The Davis School, on Tufts street, was named for him in 1884. 

John Addison Cummings was born in Nelson, N. H., January 16, 
1838. His early education was obtained in the common schools of 
his native town and the Scientific and Literary Institute in New Lon- 



300 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

don, N. H., where he remained two years, teaching school during the 
winter. He then began the study of law and continued it until the war 
broke out, when he was among the first to enlist. He was com- 
missioned a lieutenant in the 6th New Hampshire Volunteers at the 
age of 23, and served three years in that regiment in the Army of the 
Potomac and in the West. He was then made major of the 1st N. H. 
Cavalry and served with Sheridan until the close of the war. After 
spending two years at the West he returned to Boston, and entered 
the printing business in 1867. 

He took up his residence in Somerville and became the publisher 
of the SomerviWe /ourna/ in 1871-72. In 1874 he was elected to the 
Legislature and served two years. He was a member of the Board of 
Aldermen in 1877 and 1878. 

In 1881 he was elected Mayor, which office he held for four con- 
secutive years. His record in this capacity reflects great credit upon 
him. He was faithful, courteous, and painstaking, at the same time 
fearless and justly conservative in municipal affairs. He died January 
6, 1887. 

''The lesson of his life stands out to every young person, whatever 
his condition or circumstances, 'Will to be right and God will help 
you to gain your aim.' " 

The Cummings School was built during his mayoralty, and named 
for him in 1884. 

Mark F. Burns was born at Milford, N. H., May 24, 1841. He 
comes of good old New England stock, and his parents were among 
the earliest of the anti-slavery agitators. He spent his early life on 
his father's farm, and obtained his education in the public schools of 
his native town, and at the Appleton Academy in Mt. Vernon, N. H. 
He taught school for four years, coming to Boston in 1866 and engag- 
ing in the milk business. He soon became a milk contractor, and the 
Treasurer of the Boston Dairy Company, which handles the product of 
800 farms along the line of the Fitchburg Railroad and its branches. 

In 1873 Mr. Burns removed to Somerville, and very soon became 
an influential factor in municipal affairs. He was a member of the 
Common Council in 1880 and 1881, the latter year its President, and 
a member of the Board of Aldermen in 1882 and 1883. He was 
Trustee of the Public Library in 1884. He was Mayor of the city for 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 301 

four years, from l>iS6 through 1888. His administration was charac- 
terized by the same vigor, earnestness, and sterling integrity always 
displayed in the conduct of the important business interests com- 
mitted to his charge. 

Mr. Burns has been Secretary of the Mayors' Club of Massachu- 
setts since its organization, with the exception of a single year. He 
is a Director in the Monument National Bank and a Trustee in the 
Five Cents Savings Bank of Charlestown, and has filled many other 
important stations of trust and responsibility. 

Mr. Burns has always enjoyed the confidence of his fellow-citizens 
and has discharged the public duties devolving upon him in such a 
way as to secure their approbation and respect. 

The Burns School on Cherry street was built in 1886, during his 
mayoralty, and named in recognition of his services. 

Norman Williams Bingham was born in Derby, Vt., May 19, 1829, 
and educated in the public schools and in the academies at Derby and 
St. Johnsbury, Vt. He studied law at Irasburgh, and in 1855 was 
appointed Clerk of Orleans County Court, and thus became ex-officio 
Clerk of the Supreme Court and the Court of Chancery as well. 
During the war for the Union he held several important places of 
trust, both State and national, and his services were of great value to 
the country. 

In 1866 he was made special agent for the United States Treasury 
Department, and three years later was placed in charge of the customs 
revenue district of New England, comprising 32 collection districts. 
He held this important position till 1885, and discharged its arduous 
and exacting duties with great ability and fearless independence. 
His experience and influence led to the modification and improvement 
of the customs laws and to a marked increase in the efficiency of that 
department of public service. He was offered other positions of great 
responsibility under the government, but for personal or family reasons 
declined them. 

Mr. Bingham removed to Somerville in 1869, and has always been 
influential in furthering the interests of the city. He was elected to 
the School Board in 1880 and served without interruption for 15 years. 
His labors in connection with schools have been marked by a discrim- 
inating regard for their interests and by constant effort to secure their 



302 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

advancement. No more emphatic recognition of the value of his 
services, and no stronger evidence of appreciation could be given than 
the act of the City Government in naming the school on Lowell street, 
erected in 1886 and enlarged in 1894, the Bingham School, in per- 
petuation of his name and memory. 

Oren S. Knapp was born in Boston, July 16, 1829. At the age 
of six he removed to Maiden and was educated in its schools, begin- 
ning to teach at the age of 17. He entered Amherst College, but at 
the end of two years was obliged to relinquish his course on account 
of a trouble with his eyes. He taught two years in Medford, and was 
elected Principal of the Prospect Hill School, in Somerville, then the 
most important school in this vicinity, in 1853. He was a faithful and 
efficient teacher for 11 years, relinquishing his position for the 
practice of law in 1865. He was chosen a member of the School 
Board in the same year, and served at intervals for 15 years, one 
year of the time as Superintendent of Schools. He died suddenly, 
November 4, 1890. 

Mr. Knapp was one of Somerville's foremost citizens, always 
interested and prominent in every movement to advance its interests, 
fearless and independent in the expression of opinion and in action, 
wise in counsel, kind and sympathetic and helpful as a friend, loyal 
and devoted as a citizen, respected and loved by all who knew him. 

The O. S. Knapp School on Concord avenue was opened in 1890, 
and named in his honor. 

Jacob T. Glines was born in Moultonborough, N. H., July 20, 
1817. He removed to Somerville in 1836. He was always identified 
with the prosperity of Somerville as town and city. He was a mem- 
ber of the last Board of Selectmen, and chairman of the first Board of 
Aldermen. He was for several years thereafter connected with the 
city government, and represented the city in the lower branch of the 
Legislature. He died August 3, 1882. • 

Mr. Glines was engaged in manufacturing and mercantile pursuits, 
and in business as in public life, was distinguished for his sterling 
integrity, excellent judgment, and strength of character. In recogni- 
tion of his services to the city the Jacob T. Glines School was named 
in 1891. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 303 

Charles Greenwood Pope was born in Hardwick, November 18, 
1840. He was educated in the public cchools of Hyannis, Pierce 
Academy, Middleboro, and Tufts College, being graduated in 1861. 
He taught school at Hyannis till 1864, when be became Master of the 
Forster Grammar School. He resigned in 1870 to take the principal- 
ship of the Bunker Hill School, Charlestown, where he remained till 
1874, leaving for the practice of law. 

Mr. Pope was a member of the first city government, and Presi- 
dent of the City Council in 1873, being ex-officio member of the 
School Board. In 1876 and 1877 he represented the city in the 
Legislature. He was appointed special justice of Somerville police 
court in 1878. He was Mayor of the city in 1880, 1890, and 1891. 
During his last year of office the Charles G. Pope School on Washing- 
ton street was completed and named in his honor. It stands as a 
monument to his memory, and to his deep interest in the welfare of 
the public schools. 

'' He will always be gratefully remembered as one who served his 
city well, and with an eye single to the public interest. Dignified, 
honest, incorruptible, his character, either in private or public life, was 
never tainted by even the breath of suspicion." 

Rev. George W. Durell was born at Kennebunkport, Me. He 
was graduated from Bowdoin College, and at once became the Princi- 
pal of .Limerick Academy. After teaching four years he entered the 
Theological Seminary at Alexandria, Va., to prepare for the ministry. 
He was ordained at Brunswick, Me., by Bishop Burgess. 

He was settled at Calais, Me., for 11 years, serving all the while 
upon the School Board of the city. Leaving Calais he was for several 
years rector of Grace Church at Bath. 

In 1866 he removed to Somerville, and was for three years the 
rector of Emmanuel parish. Since 1869 — for more than a quarter of 
a century — he has been the esteemed and honored rector of St. 
Thomas's parish. 

For 13 years Mr. Durell served upon the School Board of Somer- 
ville, for the duties of which he was admirably fitted by nature, by 
education, and by experience. His quick and ready sympathy 
with children and with teachers, and his willing response to calls for 
advice and assistance made him always a welcome visitor to the 



304 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

schoolroom. Owing to the demands of his profession he was obliged 
to decline a re-election, much to the regret of the constituency for 
whom he had so long rendered such valuable service. 

In 1894 the school on the corner of Beacon and Kent streets was 
named the George W. Durell School, in recognition of his labors in 
behalf, not only of education, but of every cause having for its object 
the welfare and improvement of our city and its residents, young 
and old. 



REPORT 



OF THK 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



(19) 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to the Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 30, 1S95. 

Referred to the Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk, 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS 

OF THE SOMERVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY, YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1894. 



TRUSTEES. 

Charles S. Lincoln. Charles H. Brown. 

J. Henry Flitner. Elijah C. Clark. 

Christopher E. Rymes. John B. Viall. 

James E. Whitaker. Charles A. West. 

J. Frank Wellington. 

OFFICERS. 

Charles S. Lincoln ..... President. 
John S. Haves Secretary. 

COMMITTEES. 

Building and Grounds. — Rymes, Viall, Brown and Wellington. 

Administration. — Whitaker, Wellington and Clark. 

Books and Catalogues. — Lincoln, ex officio, Rymes, West, Viall, 
and Brown. 

Finance. — Flitner, Clark, and Whitaker. 

LIBRARIAN. 

John S. Hayes. 

ASSISTANTS. 
Anna L. Stone. Mary j. Warren. 

CATALOGUER. 

F. ^Label Norcross. 



10 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR 1894. 

Credit. 
Balance from 1893 
Appropriation . 



;Dog Licenses 

Fines 

Catalogues 



23.36 

6,500.00 

2,710.90 

320.82 

12.40 













$9,567.48 


Debit. 


Books and Periodicals * . ^3,287.83 


Binding ..... 








766.67 


Covers $68.41, Cards S30.40 . 








98.81 


Printing, $67.35, Postal Cards, $30.0 









97.35 


Stationery .... 








52.79 


Salaries, Administrative department 








3,086.87 


" Cataloguing department 








526.00 


Branch office ..... 








100.00 


Book Case and Furniture . 










140.38 


Repairs .... 










205.24 


Express .... 










184.20 


Electric Lighting 










403.18 


Gas .... 










4.99 


Gas Fixtures 










29.90 


Water .... 










29.00 


Fuel . • . 










176.21 


Insurance 










142.50 


Fireproof Safe . 










72.50 


Disbursements 










66.86 


Picture Frames 










24.42 


Postage .... 










31.00 


Speaking Tubes and Telephone 










19.10 


Placque and Frame 










9. 00 


Rubber Stamps 










3.13 


Balance to 1895 










9.55 



$9,567.48 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



To THE CiTv Council of Somerville : — 

Gentlemen, — As Trustees of the Public Librar}', we beg leave to 
give to your honorable Boards the following report : — 

The work entrusted to us has needed and received sedulous care. 
We are more than ever impressed with its importance. As our city 
enlarges its prosperity, and its population multiplies, the public library 
has increased usefulness and breadth of influence. It has been our 
aim to improve all facilities for its wider and more practical use, so 
that our fellow-citizens of every age and in every walk of life might 
gain from it those advantages it was designed to furnish. 

It is well known that ours is an unclassified library. As such it 
has subserved a useful purpose. But as the number of its volumes 
increases it becomes more apparent that many choice and valuable 
books do not become generally known to its patrons. This fact has 
become of such grave importance that during the past year we have 
very largely given our strength to a new and more accessible classifica- 
tion of the entire library. Such a classification, if it be complete and 
judicious, not only as to topics but also as to titles and authors, will 
enable those who wish to consult the library, to do so much more 
readily than at present. Connected with this classification it is pro- 
posed to inaugurate a careful system of cross references, by which the 
object of search will be more easily found. All this cannot be done 
without considerable labor and expense. But the value of the result 

will more than warrant the outlav. ^luch delav in the deliverv of 

J » J 

books will be avoided, and thus the convenience of the public better 
served. History, biography and fiction, being more frequently called 
for, will be placed near the delivery desk, and thus a more perfect dis- 
tribution of books can be made. This system has been employed 
in other libraries with a very considerable saving of labor and time. 
In connection with the new system of classification and delivery 



312 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

of books, we have introduced hiformation slips ; and propose to give 
larger facility in the use of reference books, to make the reading room 
more complete, and to allow, with suitable restrictions, persons en- 
gaged in special or professional investigations freer range in taking 
books from the library. 

At all times the librarian and his assistants will be ready to make 
suggestions, and give help to those who may seek to know what books 
are accessible for the study of any particular topic. This will make a 
legitimate use of the library more complete, since those who have 
especially to do with books may be justly supposed to know, in some 
general way at least, what they contain. 

Just at this point, it is an interesting fact that the number of books 
added to the library during the past year, both by purchase and dona- 
tion, surpasses that of any other year. Some of these books are of 
great value. 

The use of the hbrary by the public at large is steadily on the in- 
crease. The number of books taken out for home use the past year 
exceeded 106,000. 

This enlargement of the library in the number of its books, and 
in the use of them, demands larger space, or a new method of shelv- 
ing. Very careful attention has been given to this matter, and after 
much painstaking consideration, it was concluded that the present 
shelving room be changed into a stack room. This would add very 
largely to the book capacity of the room, and as the books would nec- 
essarily be more compact, the labor of reference and delivery would 
be very much lessened. It has been a source of great gratification 
that when the matter was brought to the attention of the city govern- 
ment, the response was so immediate and liberal that steps were taken 
at once in preparation for the much-needed change. 

All this necessitates enlarged appropriations for the library. But it 
is confidently believed that our citizens will readily endorse any action 
which, in giving them better accommodation, will further the interest 
of all concerned. 

It must be expected that as the library grows the expense of main- 
taining it must increase. The public should take pride in the fact 
that the growth of the city means not only material prosperity and 
additions to the census list, but growth in intellectual vigor and 
capacity. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 313 

It is a fact that is everywhere noticeable, especially in our larger 
towns and cities, that the citizens are not content with the meagre 
facilities and cramped space once deemed sufficient, but with larger 
and more generous views, erect substantial and commodious library 
buildings. As the poet sings, ^'The thoughts of men are widened with 
the process of the suns." 

Not only do cities and towns appear to vie with each other in 
erecting buildings for the better accommodation of the volumes that 
crowd the shelves, but the buildings to a large extent encourage sculp- 
ture and art, and provide quiet and sheltered alcoves where the 
student may consult such works, as under ordinary conditions could 
not be conveniently used. 

Yet, let it be said, that while public libraries have come to be con- 
sidered as institutions of large educational value, it is nevertheless 
true that in many instances they are not used to the extent they 
should be. We venture to suggest that the teachers of our public 
schools would further the interests of education in this city to a well- 
nigh incalculable extent, if they would bring the school into closer 
contact with the library. If the teachers and the friends of our free 
public school system would make a study of our library, they would 
learn without difficulty that the studies in the schools would become 
more interesting and valuable if the scholars were induced to read 
books our library could furnish, which bear more or less directly upon 
their studies. In making this suggestion, without the slightest purpose 
to interfere with the judgment of those who have the interests of our 
public schools especially in their charge, we venture to add, in our own 
behalf, what we deem to be of great importance. 

There can be no question but that every institution has its own 
peculiar influence, character and possibility. There are few organiza- 
tions that deserves more serious consideration than the public library, 
and it may be added that few are more beset w4th perplexities. The 
pubHc library, of any age marks the civilization of that age. 

It is impossible for us to guard this trust given into our hands too 
cautiously, neither can we fulfil the duties it brings with it without 
constant study of its character and needs. Let it be understood that 
a well-equipped public library is not a mere collection of books. It 
must be a reservoir of general literature, embracing history, philos- 
ophy, science and art. The books to be selected must be such as 



314 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

shall suit the old and the young, those who seek instruction, and those 
who wish only entertainment. The library is for th.Q public, and must 
fit the conditions of the public need, not of any class or age. Its 
range must be as comprehensive as its resources will permit. Only 
thus can it be educational in the finest, truest sense of that word. Its 
first aim should be to encourage a taste for reading, and then guide 
that taste till the mere reader becomes a student, for reading is not so 
important as thought. Mere reading tends to mental dissipation. It 
is opium by which to get unreal visions, and so forgetfulness. It 
soothes to languor ; it gives lassitude for energy; it forgets the real 
world to create another which is only a mirage. Yet all taste for liter- 
ature must begin from the habit of reading, and that habit should be 
cultivated among the young. Just here arises serious perplexity. 
That is, to find books that will interest and yet not be mischievous. 
Perhaps in no other department of the library has more conscientious 
scrutiny been exercised than in the selection of works of fiction. In 
this class of literature this age is remarkably prolific. Yet, however 
critical the care in examining the books themselves, and in passing 
judgment on the opinion of those who write reviews and book notices, 
it is exceedingly difficult to determine in every instance as to the 
merits or demerits of every book. Then again, there must be some 
latitude in deferring to the opinions of those who are certainly com- 
petent to judge in other matters, and who might desire a class of works 
which would be representative of different phases of thought, or faith, 
or life. The stream of life never rises higher than its source. Never- 
theless, books may be, will be admitted which are not profitable to all. 
Here it may be said that much may be left to the discretion of our 
librarian. Nevertheless, this must not be altogether relied upon. 
While it is doubtless true, that large responsibility rests upon those 
into whose hands the library has been entrusted, for breadth and com- 
prehensiveness, so that all topics may be fairly represented, and while 
it is also true that such responsibility embraces the literary style, 
power, and intellectual and moral character of those books classed as 
''light literature," yet it cannot be too emphatically stated that this does 
not relieve the parent or guardian from determining the range of read- 
ing children should have. All books are not for all people. The 
literature of one century may invite the studious attention of a 
scholar, and yet be by no means suitable for the school or the home. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 315 

The board of trustees and the Hbrarian must exercise dihgent care 
that the selection of books be wise and wholesome ; 'but this must not 
be held to excuse the parent, guardian or teacher from his or her 
responsibility. Our children and youth must be as carefully re- 
strained and directed in the use of the books of the public library, 
as in any other direction. Look out for the springs of life that the 
stream may run clear. It should never be forgotten that the real 
germ is hidden in the bud. The child holds the possibility of what 
shall be the man or woman. 

It will be found that the report of our librarian, John S. Hayes, has 
peculiar interest, in view of what we have already stated, and we in- 
corporate it as a part of this report, as it gives an admirable resume 
of the condition, growth, aims, possibilities and needs of the library, 
and the work that has been carried on by him since his election. It 
contains much valuable information and, in connection with his last 
report, gives a history of the library from its origin to the present 
time. 

The trustees are pleased in being able to say that the work of our 
present librarian promises to be of very great value to the community. 
He has been assiduous in his labors, and untiring in his zeal. We are 
pleased also to add, that his assistants have creditably co-operated with 
him and have discharged their duties with great fidelity. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES S. LINCOLN, Chairman. 
January 28, 1895. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



To THE Trustees of the Somerville Public Library : — 

Gentlemefi, — In compliance with your by-laws, it becomes my 
duty to place in your hands this, my second report, as the twenty- 
second annual report of the librarian, covering the operations of the 
library for the year 1894. 

The library has received the generous support of the city govern- 
ment and the public, and has responded to all calls made upon it, as 
best it could under the circumstances. It is a pleasure to record the 
fact that the circulation of books has been greater the past year than 
in any other year since the library was established, notwithstanding 
the fact that for the first time in its history the figures representing 
its circulation during the last six months mean actual circulation, 
without the addition of renewals, whereas up to that time every book 
renewed, counted as being taken out twice, when as a matter of fact 
it had left the library but once. 



STATISTICS. 

The whole number of books placed in the library since it was 
founded in 1872, as recorded in the Accession Catalogue, is 27,729 — 
and the number worn out, lost, and withdrawn, as nearly as can be 
ascertained, during this same period has been 2,592 volumes, making 
the number of books in the library at the present time, 25,137. This 
does not include many volumes in the public document room, nor 
about 1,000 volumes in the duplicate room, which have never been 
entered in the Accession Catalogue, but are available in exchange for 
books needed, and for replacement. 

During the year you have added 2,860 volumes, while 146 have 
been w^orn out, lost, or withdrawn. Of the number added, 216 
volumes were from donations, and 2,644 volumes by purchase and 



318 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



binding of serials. The number added during the year exceeds by 
over 1,000 volumes the number added during any other year since the 
library was opened to the public. 

It may be of interest to note the additions of books to the library 
each year since it was started, as found recorded in the Accession 
Catalogue. These figures denote the total accessions, and include the 
volumes worn out, lost, or withdrawn. 

The library was open to the public May 1, 1873, with 2,384 
volumes on its shelves. 



Volumes May 1, 1873 
Added during 1873 
1874 

'' 1875 

1876 
1877 
1878 

'' 1879 

1880 
1881 
1882 

" 1883 

1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 



Total number Dec. 31, 1894 



Added Each 
Year. 

2,384 


Accession No. Dec, 31, 
of Each Year. 


1,251 

1,027 

573 


3,635 
4,662 
5,235 


602 


5,837 


853 


6,690 


749 


7,439 


515 


7,954 


660 
668 


8,614 
9,282 


770 
913 


10,052 
10,965 


859 
964 


11,824 

12,788 


1,150 


13,938 


1,165 
1,846 


15,103 • 
16,949 


1,346 


18,295 


1,817 
1,432 
1,648 
1,677 


20,112 
21,544 
23,192 
24,869 


2,860 


27,729 



27,729 volumes. 



It will be noticed that during the first five years there were added 
an average of 861 volumes each year ; during the next five years an 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 319 

average of 672 volumes each year; during the third period of five 
years, an average of 1,010 volumes each year, and during the fourth 
period, an average of 1,618 volumes each year. In the year 1893, 
1,677 volumes were added, and the present year, 2,860 volumes. 

As the city increases in population, and the volumes become worn 
out, it will be absolutely necessary to increase the annual additions if 
the usefulness of the library remains unimpaired. 

The library has been open to the public 304 days during the past 
year, and 106,341 books have been given out for home use, a daily 
average of 350. The largest number given out in one day was April 
14, 1,062. The largest number m one month was in April, 12,505; 
the smallest number was in August, 6,525. 

There were distributed through the agency in West Somerville, 
8,229 volumes, and by the East Somerville agency,. 5, 100 volumes. 

The number of library cards in use at the present time is about 
5,538, of which 923 have been issued during the present year. 



VALUABLE ADDITIONS. 

Among the more costly books added to the reference library are 
Old Colony Historical Society collections. Complete, 14 vols. 
Maine Historical Society collections. tI!omplete, 8 vols. 
Connecticut Historical Proceedings. Complete, 3 vols. 
Contributions of the old residents of Lowell. Complete, 5 vols. 
Duneker's History of Antiquity. 5 vols. 
History of the 13th regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. 

Adj. General's Report of N. H. during the Rebellion. 6 vols. 

Modern Machine Shop Practice. 2 vols. 

Acts and Resolves of Mass., 1781-1785. 4 vols. 

" Bay Colony. 
Scribner's Statistical Atlas U. S. 
Shaler's U. S. of America. 2 vols. 
Map of American Politics. 
Cushing's Anonyms. 4 vols. 
Catalogue Boston Athenaeum. 5 vols. 
Journals of Washington. 3 vols. 



320 ANNUAL REPORTS 

Baitlett's Concordance of Shakespeare. 

Bradshaw's Concordance to Milton. 

Allen's American Book-Plates. 

History of Suffolk County. 4 vols. 

Dictionary of National Biography, A-N. 40 vols. 

History of the First Maine Cavalry. 

Portraits in Plaster. 

America's Wonderland. 

Larned's History for ready reference. 5 vols. 

Bradford's History of Mass. 

For general circulation we have added : 
Bagehot's Complete Works. 5 vols. 

Hospitals, Dispensaries and Nursing. Ed. by Billings and Hurd. 
World's Parliament of Religion. 
Conversations of Lord Byron. 

Dillon's Laws and Jurisprudence of England and America. 
Thomas Jefferson's Works. 
Curtis's Orations and Addresses. 
Hittell's Mankind in Ancient Times. 4 vols. 
Mrs. Green's Town Life in the XV. Century. 2 vols. 
Letters of Harriet Countess Granville. 
Porcupine's Works. Complete, 12 vols. 
Spark's Diplomatic Correspondence. 19 vols. 
Abraham Lincoln's Complete Works. 2 vols. 
Conway's Climbing the Himalayas. 
Wharton's Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution. 

6 vols. 
Memoirs of Edmund Ludlow. 2 vols. 
History of Trades Unionism. 
Wilson's Cyclopaedia Photography. 
The Industries of Russia. 5 vols. 
Memoirs of Baron de Meneval. 3 vols. 
Didon's Life of Christ. 2 vols. 
Bonney's Story of One Planet. 

Studies in Historical and Political Science. 25 vols. 
Cambridge Bible for Schools, with notes. 35 vols. 
Glacial Geology of Great Britain. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 321 

Masson's Napoleon at Home. 

History of England under Henry IV. 

Memoirs of the International Congress of Anthropology. 

Flammarion's Popular x^stronomy. 

Geology, Chemical, Physical and Strategraphical. 

Erman's Life in Ancient Egypt. 

Simcox's Primitive Civilization. 2 vols. 

American Journal of Microscopy. Complete, 10 vols. 

Appleton's Journal. Complete, 2-4 vols. 

Our Young Folks. (Magazine). Complete, 9 volb. 

Andover Review. Complete, 10 vols. 

Review of Reviews. (From the beginning.) 

Cosmopolitan Magazine. 

Gleason's Pictorial Magazine. 

DONATIONS. 

During the year the library has received as gifts 1,492 bound 
volumes, 713 pamphlets, 1,309 numbers of periodicals, and one pic- 
ture. Of the bound volumes received, we have entered in the Acces- 
sion Catalogue and placed on the shelves of the library only 216 
volumes, as it was decided best to reserve these books for the new 
classification, as the time of the cataloguers could be more profitably 
employed on the books now in the circulating library, and, besides, 
the shelf room available in the main room was needed for the new 
books. 

The Boston Public Library presented 1,150 volumes from its 
duplicates, among which were many rare and valuable books. Charles 
S. Lincoln, Charles A. West, and Charles H. Brown, of the Board of 
Trustees, have each given many books and periodicals, which will aid 
us in completing our sets of books and magazines. Dr. Eben 
Jackson presented a fine copy of '' Schools and School Boys of old 
Boston," and the SomerviUe Journal Company, 58 bound volumes, 38 
pamphlets, and 104 periodicals; Geo. O. Proctor, 26 volumes, and P. 
M. Harwood, a fine large photograph of a part of the '^Ancient Earth- 
works of SomerviUe," richly framed, which can be seen in the Ameri- 
cana room. The heirs of the noted historian, the late Francis Park- 
man, presented to this library his copy of the Boston Athenaeum 



322 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



library catalogue, in two large volumes, a work of intrinsic value, 
which will be highly prized, coming as it does from Mr. Parkman's 
private library, and containing his autograph. 

LIST OF DONATIONS. 



Adams, Mrs. Lucy M . 

American Citizen . . . . . 

Ames, Geo. A., Lowell . . . . •. 

Amherst College ....... 

Bohemian Voice ....... 

Boston Public Library ...... 

Bingham, N. W. 

Brigham, C. H. . 

Broadway Central Hotel, N. Y 

Brooklyn Public Library ..... 

Brooks, E. S. ....... 

Brown, C. H. ........ 

Brockton Enterprise ....... 

Cambridge Public Library ..... 

Carpenter, A. F. . 

Chicago Public Library ...... 

Christian Register ...... 

Cilley, J. P. . _ 

Cincinnati Public Library ..... 

Citizen Publishing Co. ...... 

City of Somerville ....... 

Clerc, P. M 

Clinton Public Library 

Crane, D. F. . . 

Danvers Peabody Institute ...... 

DeCosta, Rev. B. F 

Dike, Rev. S. W 

Dover Public Library 

Duddy, Robert 

Eaton, Clifford 

Ellinger, William, Va • . 

Elliot, CD 

Elliot, Miss Mary E 

Ewing, Thos., N. Y 

Fall River Public Library ...... 

Field, Mrs. L. A. 

Young People's Society Christian Endeavor, First Uni- 
versalist Church ....... 

Fitchburg Public Library 

Flint, Warren F 

Folsom, Channing 

Free Library of Philadelphia . . . . . 

Galpin, Mrs. Barbara ....... 

Giles, Jos. J. ........ 

Glines, A.W 



Vols. 



1,150 
1 



2 

75 



10 
1 



Pamph. 



7 

2 

180 
1 



248 
1 
1 



Periodi- 
cals. 



12 
32 



12 
14 



1 
330 



52 



52 



20 



12 
64 



12 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



323 



LIST OF DONATIONS.— Con^im^e^. 



Gordon, Geo. A. . 

Grand Rapids, Mich., Board of Trade 

Green, Dr. S. A. . 

Hallet & Davis .... 

Harvard College .... 

Harwood, P. M., "Ancient Earthvt'orks of Somerville," 

picture and frame. 
Hawes, F. M. 
Hayes, J. S. 
Hayes, Miss L. Y. 
Hills, Thos. 
Home Market Club 
Hunnewell, J. F. 
Indian Rights Association 
Jackson, Dr. Eben 
Jones, Wm. P. 
Kelsey, E. E. 
Kimball, F. M. . 
Lancaster Public Library 
Lincoln, C. S. 
Lodge, Hon. H. C. 
Los Angeles Public Library 
Lynn Public Library 
McCall, Hon. S. W. . 
Mairnonides Library, N. Y. City 
Maiden Public Library 
Mafes. Convention of Universalists 
Mass. Society Prevention of Cruelty to Animals 
Medford High School Association 
Melrose Public Library 
Merriam, Miss M. B. . 
Milwaukee Public Library . 
Mt. Holyoke College . 
National Civil Reform League 
Newark Public Library 
N. H. State Library . 
New London Public Library 
Newton Public Library 
New York Teachers' College 
North Adams Public Library 
Osgood, Warren 
Otis Library, Norwich, Conn. 
Parkman, Francis, heirs of . 
Pattee & Co., Los Angeles, Cal 
Peabody Institute Library . 
Portland, Or., Public Library 
Pratt, R. D. 
Prince Society, Boston 
Proctor, Geo. O. 
Redwood Library, Newport 
St. Louis Mercantile Library 



Vols. 


Pamph. 


1 


1 




I 




2 


1 




^ 1 




1 




7 


2 


1 


1 



Periodi- 
cals. 



10 
14 



2 

26 



10 



12 



24: 



12 



(20) 



324 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 

LIST OF DONATIONS.— Confini/ed. 



Salem Public Library . 

Sanborn, Miss H. J. 

Sanford, P B. . 

Scranton Public Library 

Seaver, E. P. 

Springfield Public Library 

State of Massachusetts 

State Supt. of Schools, Wis. 

Stone, E. A. 

Socialist Annual 

Somerville Journal Co. 

Somerville Y. M. C. A. 

The People, New York 

Thompson, B. F. 

Thomson, John, Phila. 

Travellers' Insurance Co. 

Trustees for children of Shalem, Dcna 

Trustees Public Reservation 

Tufts College 

Tuftonian, Tufts College 

Union Pacific Railroad 

United' Societies. Manifesto 

United States Government 

Vincent, Geo. I. . 

Watertown Public Library 

Wellington, J. F. 

Wentworth, T. S. 

West, C. A. 

Winship, Geo. 

Woods, H. F. 

Worcester Public Library 



Anna 



New Mex 



Vols. 



1 
1 

I 

34 
4 

58 



32 
3 

2 

1 
12 

1 
3 



Pamph. 



3 
1 

1 

1 

38 
6 



120 
1 
1 

1 

1 



Periodi- 
cals. 



12 

12 

104 
16 

12 

15 
12 



250 
80 



I would again repeat what was said in my last report, " It is hoped 
that the example set by these generous donors will be followed by 
others, and that many books, pamphlets and periodicals that are now 
lying unused in many a household will be sent here, and either be put 
into circulation, or, if they should be duplicates of those we now have 
be exchanged by us for books we need." 



NEW STACK ROOM. 

At a meeting of the Board of Trustees of this library, held April 
30, it was voted : — "That the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
and the Librarian be authorized to obtain plans, specifications, and 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 325 

estimates for changing the book room into a stack room, and report 
to this board." This committee, after visiting other hbraries, thor- 
oughly studying all the questions involved as to the present and future 
needs of the library, and the prospective enlargement of the building 
at no distant day, invited three leading firms engaged in the manu- 
facture of library stacks, to submit plans embodying the ideas which 
the committee had in view, namely : To make the present book room 
into a stack room capable of holding at least 60,000 volumes, and so 
constructed that it would be equally available in the buildino; as now 
constructed and used, or in that reconstructed building that must 
come in the future, when adequate provision is made for the work this 
library should do, as outlined in last year's report. 

This committee made their report at a meeting held June 2, and 
recommended that the plans and specifications submitted by 
A. B. & W. T. Westervelt, of New York, be adopted, and that it 
would cost about $6,000 to make the proposed change. It was unani- 
mously voted : " That the secretary of this Board communicate the 
action of this board to the City Council, and ask for a special 
appropriation of $6,000, to change the present book room into a steel 
stack room." 

I appeared before the Finance Committee of the City Council, by 
invitation, with the plans for the proposed change, and explained the 
urgent need of more shelf room, so that we could classify the books 
and reorganize the library. It was understood by the members of 
the city government that we did not intend to use this money until 
next year, as it would take a year for us to classify and catalogue the 
books and prepare for the change, but that the trustees did not feel 
justified in continuing the work of reorganizing the library, unless they 
were assured by the City Council that the money for the alterations 
would be available when needed. 

At meetings of the Board of Aldermen and the Common Council 
held June 13, an order was passed appropriating, for public library 
improvement, for increased accommodation for books, $3,000,and the 
order was approved by the Mayor, June 15. 

It appears that the full sum asked for by this board was not appro- 
priated at that time, because the City Council only had about $3,000 
at their disposal, v/hich they placed to the credit of Public Library Im- 
provement, feeling confident that next year's city government would 



326 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

complete the appropriation. We have, therefore, at the city hall, the 
sum of $3,000, and there is no reason to doubt that at an early day 
next year's City Council will vote the remaining $3,000. 

This prompt and liberal action of the city government assured this 
board that they would be justified in proceeding with the work of 
classifying and recataloguing the books, and it is hoped and 
expected that by the first of next September, our library will not only 
be amply supplied with shelf room, but that we shall have a new Find- 
ing List printed of all the books, arranged by classes, under authors 
and titles, and a new card catalogue containing subjects, authors, 
titles and cross references, well under way. 

DESCRIPTION OF STACK. 

The exterior of the building will be changed in book-stack 
wing only, by increasing window area. The present windows are to 
be elongated by adding two sashes at bottom, having a panel between 
the present sill and top of new windows, which will improve the 
appearance of the structure. The interior structure is not to be 
changed, there being sufficient height to accommodate the second 
tier of book stacks. 

The new stacks are of light construction of steel, and will be two 
stories high, with heavy glass plates for second floor, and access to the 
same will be by two sets of iron stairs, one at each end. 

A large book- lift is to be put in at the rear of this second book- 
stack floor, to the basement, where the packing, unpacking and repair- 
ing of books will be done. In the front will be a small book-lift from 
near the delivery desk to the second floor. 

The present wooden cases are clumsy compared with the steel 
stacks, which are well designed and have ornamental facias, and the 
patent device for interchangeable shelving is not only more econom- 
ical, but admits of better classification. 

The present upper floor will have to be extended under the old 
wall shelving, which is to be removed. The second floor of the book 
stack has an ornamental front, and gallery rail. The new stack being 
open-work in all parts, admits a free circulation of air through all the 
shelves, and over all the books, equalizing the temperature, and there- 
by tends to preserve them. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



327 



SHELF ROOM. 

The amount of shelving for books in this library at the present 
time is about 3,725 linear feet. Allowing an average of eight and 
one-half books to each foot of shelf room, which seems to be the 
amount of space generally agreed upon by librarians, the total capac- 
ity of the library, assuming that every inch of shelving could be 
utilized, would be 31,662 volumes, distributed as follows : 



Book room . 
Americana room . 
Magazine room 
Public document room 
Reference room . 



23,587 volumes 
1,020 
1,513 
3,714 

1,820 . '■ 



The new stack alone, if completed as planned, would hold 60,000 
volumes. 

The 18 book cases, now in the book room, each capable of hold- 
ing 1,000 volumes, are to be distributed in the other rooms of the 
building. Then the book capacity of this building will be as follows : 



Stack room . 


60,000 volumes 


Americana room . 


1,020 


Magazine room 


1,513 


Public document room . 


3,714 


Reference room . 


1,820 


Book cases 


18,000 



A total of over 86,000 volumes, or 54,000 volumes more than at 
the present time. How many years of growth will be required for the 
library to reach this limit of 86,000 volumes is a problem we need not 
now consider. But at no distant day, you must consider and solve the 
problem of furnishing generous, ample rooms for the following pur- 
poses : General delivery, and a card catalogue ; reading room, worthy 
of the name ; reference room large enough for the needs of this con- 
stantly-growing city ; rooms for individual research and study ; room 
for cataloguing ; room for covering and repairing books ; rooms for 
relics ; art rooms ; music rooms ; and classrooms. 

The world is moving. Public library work is in its infancy, and 



328 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

its future possibilities are immeasurable. Somerville may lead or follow, 
but the movement is onward, and will broaden out and occupy new 
and more important fields of usefulness. 

CATALOGUES, OR FINDING LISTS. 

Should a person desire to ascertain whether our library contains 
a certain book, at the present time, he would have to consult fifteen 
lists, thus making it necessary to look through fifteen alphabets before 
he would be certain that the desired book is not in the library. 

All books in the library bought before May 1, 1894, are entered 
either in the catalogue of 1888, or the supplements of 1889, 1891, or 
the Somerville ^^2/r;2«3:/ supplement of 1894. All books purchased 
since last May are entered in Bulletins 1 to 11, second series, also 
in the general card catalogue. 

The difficulty of finding a book in a large library that depends 
solely on printed lists, is so great that the average mortal gives up in 
despair, and will take anything he can get rather than fathom the 
depths of the mysteries of printed catalogues, supplements, bulletins, 
and finding lists, particularly if they have become as numerous as they 
are in our library. '' It requires resolution and perseverance to get on 
terms with a big library, and the expenditure of time involved is more 
than a busy man can afford. It occurred to some enemy of the human 
race to invent catalogues of the ordinary type. The true bibliophile 
soon acquires a profound distrust and suspicion of these works. They 
are a fruitful source of cerebral irritation, headache, and biliousness." 

Printed catalogues soon get out of date ; new ones must be pre- 
pared, and they are very expensive. 

As soon as we complete the present classification of books and 
give them their new position on the shelves, every call number will 
be changed, and no list now in existence will aid one in finding any par- 
ticular book. We must prepare new ones. 

The card catalogue is the ideal catalogue in many respects. It is 
always up to date, and when arranged under classes, subjects, titles, 
authors, and cross references, with bibliographical notes, is of incal- 
culable value. But a card catalogue for the use of the general public 
must be displayed in a large room so that many persons can consult it 
at the same time. A card catalogue has its limitations and its own 
particular field. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 320 

I am confident that this library cannot satisfy the demands of the 
public with a card catalogue alone. Many persons use the library who 
seldom come to this building themselves ; a large number of books are 
distributed through the two agencies ; schoolchildren become messen- 
gers, and these patrons demand lists that they can consult at home. 

Instead of the customary printed catalogue, I would recommend a 
printed finding list of all of the books in the library, arranged under 
classes, by titles and by authors, using, as far as practicable, short 
titles, with a full index, or table of contents. I would have it so 
arranged that the several classes of books could be bound up 
separately if thought desirable. A finding list of this character would 
cost at least $2,000, and a special appropriation should be made by 
the City Council to pay for it. 

REBINDING. 

During the past year 1,838 volumes have been sent to the bindery, 
and each year this number must be larger as the library grows in size 
and in age, consequently the bills for rebinding will necessarily in- 
crease, and this fact should be considered by the City Council in mak- 
ing its annual appropriation. Of this number, 1,410 volumes were 
books from the circulating department, and 428 volumes were 
magazines. 

Among the latter were complete sets of the Atlantic, Harper, 
Century, Scribner, Appleton, and St. Nicholas, bound in one-half 
morocco for the reference library. 

FRENCH AND GERMAN BOOKS. 

During the year 95 volumes printed in the French language have 
been placed in the library, not only for the benefit of our French pop- 
ulation, which is sufficiently numerous to make it desirable to supply 
these books, but for that constantly-increasing class of Americans who 
have studied the language, read it easily, and are glad to obtain works 
which represent and illustrate the several classes of French literature. 

The frequent calls for these books indicate that they were needed 
and are appreciated by readers or students of the language. 

The same reasons that lead to the introduction of books in the 



330 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

French language into the library, apply with equal or stronger force to 
books in the German language, and I suggest if the funds at your dis- 
posal will permit, that during the coming year an alcove of books in 
the German language be started. 

RENEWALS. 

In my report last year I took occasion to call your attention to the 
fact that all of the books of fiction, juvenile books, some works of 
travel, histories, and many other books in the library, were marked to 
circulate only seven days, and the by-laws did not allow books so 
marked renewed, and expressed the opinion that with the possible ex- 
ception of works of fiction and some small books, one week was too 
short a period to devote to a good book, and thought the patrons of 
the library would appreciate having as few seven-day books as possible, 
and that it would, in my judgment, be wise to make all books that 
have been in the circulating library one year, fourteen-day books, per- 
haps not allowing works of fiction and juveniles to be renewed. 

The question how long a book may be permitted to remain in the 
hands of a reader before it must be returned to the library so that 
another reader can obtain it, is a very serious and troublesome one in 
a small library, with a large constituency. And this library comes 
under this head, for we have in our circulating department only about 
one book for three inhabitants. 

Under the by-laws above referred to, a book marked ''seven-day" 
could enter fifty-two families in one year, while a fourteen-day book 
could be used but thirteen times, if each person taking it kept it the 
full time permitted by the rule. A careful consideration of the old 
rule, by this Board, led to the adoption of the following in its place : 

"Article xi. All books shall be fourteen-day books, unless other- 
wise designated, and no book shall be retained longer than the time 
prescribed. 

Article xii. No renewal of any book shall be made till the vol- 
ume has remained in the library one full day from its return." 

By these new rules, all books, unless plainly marked to the con- 
trary, can be retained fourteen days and no more, and cannot be re- 
newed, or transferred from one card to another, so as to remain in the 
same household for a longer period. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 331 

At the present time, new and popular works of fiction and a few 
other small books are marked "seven-day," but the number of seven-day- 
books in the library is relatively very small. It may be desirable to 
mark some of the larger works "twenty-one or twenty-eight-day," 
but up to the present time all books are either seven-day or fourteen- 
day books. 

The new rule seems to be working well, and is giving general 
satisfaction so far as I am able to learn. 

REREGISTRATION. 

At a meeting of this Board held November 26, it was voted : 
"That the Librarian be instructed to have a reregistration of all the 
patrons of this library at his earliest convenience." 

The common experience of public libraries has shown that a new 
registration at least as often as once in five years is almost a necessity. 
The practice of the various libraries as to frequency, extent or 
duration, is not at all uniform. Most of the newer libraries, and 
many of the older, have found it best to limit the period of regis- 
tration, and consequent life of the library card, to terms of either two 
or three years, usually the former ; a few have adopted five years as 
the limit. 

The advantage of prompt notification in case of overdue books, 
that is, those kept beyond the loan period provided by the rules of the 
Hbrary, has long been understood ; and losses to the library are 
greatly lessened when such practice is promptly followed. But the 
first requisite to effective notice is to have the correct address of the 
delinquent. Long terms of registration are not conducive to accu- 
racy in that respect, owing to the very large percentage of persons 
who neglect to give the required notice to the library of any change 
of residence, and this defect is more evident in the case of the two 
persons who recommended the card -holder, and who are in a certain 
sense morally responsible, at least, for his neglect. 

Of the volumes reported as not recovered from readers at this 
library, nearly every one represents the loan to some reader who at 
the time when his card was issued to him was living at the street and 
number at which his registration locates him, but who at the time 
when the missing book was issued to him was no longer living there, 
and could not be traced farther. 



332 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Our best safeguard against the loss of books, is a vigilant over- 
sight on the part of the Librarian in sending for overdue books, and 
to do this promptly and successfully it is necessary to have the correct 
address of the card-holder and his recommenders. 

Reregistration means a large amomit of work for the library force, 
and a certain amount of annoyance to the book-takers, but neither of 
these need be excessive under a proper system, and I trust we may 
be able to carry out your instruction of November 26, without 
seriously interfering with the regular work of the library, or interrupt- 
ing the continuous taking out of books by our patrons. 

CASE FOR NEW BOOKS. 

The time has not arrived when it seems practicable to recommend 
that the patrons of the library should be admitted to the book room 
to examine and select their own books, neither do I consider it worth 
the time to give the arguments for or against this plan. I would, how- 
ever, suggest for your consideration, that a book-case be placed either 
in the delivery room or in the reading room, easy of access to the 
public, and that on its open shelves all new books be placed, that they 
may be handled and examined by readers at their leisure, or taken 
by them, after being charged on their card, for home use. This 
would "give access to the shelves" so far as new books are concerned, 
and I am confident that this privilege would be appreciated, and 
that it would immediately put into circulation many books that would 
not be called for, were readers only directed to them by seeing their 
titles on the bulletin board or in the local papers. 

If it were found, after trial, that this method of exposing new books 
did not work satisfactorily or that the privilege was abused, it would 
be an easy matter to discontinue it. 

I also suggest that a case of reference books, such as encyclo- 
paedias, unabridged dictionaries, biographical dictionary, Lippincott's 
Gazetteer, Brewer's Handbooks, etc., be placed in the reading room 
for readers to consult at their pleasure. 

INFORMATION SLIPS. 

It seems to me that one of the most important duties that the 
Librarian should perform is to assist readers and students in their 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 333 

search for books and information in connection with their reading and 
study. And I desire all persons to feel and to exercise the utmost 
freedom in calling on me for any assistance or advice which I may 
be thought to be able to give. 

I have placed in the delivery room this notice : " It is hoped that 
those who make use of the library will have no hesitancy in consulting 
the Librarian and assistants in all matters upon which information is 
needed. Inquiries regarding special subjects of study are always in- 
vited, and will receive careful attention. Information slips can be 
obtained at the desk." 

It is very gratifying to report that many have accepted the in- 
vitation, and fully appreciate all assistance rendered. While freely 
giving all the information in our power, our constant aim should be 
to assist readers to search for themselves, after directing them to the 
source from which the information can be obtained. 

If we are not able to give the information required, at the time 
the request is made, we mail it as soon as it is obtained. 

Next to supplying the books themselves, it seems to me the most 
important work we can do is to judiciously guide and assist readers 
in the selection and use of books. 

In the line of this kind of work, we have published in the local 

papers and have distributed special reading lists, not only giving the 

titles, authors, and shelf numbers of some of the books on the subject, 

but calling attention to articles in the periodicals that should be read. 

These are among the subjects bulletined : — 

Sandwich Islands and Hawaii. 

Books for Boys (with helpful notes about each book). 

Political Science. 

Protection and Free Trade. 

Labor and Trades Unions. 

Edward Everett Hale. 

Money and Finance. 

Books Relating to Unconventional Journeys. 

Books of Nature for Summer Reading. 

Summer Sports and Out-door Exercises. 

Mountain Expeditions. 

Yachts and Yachting. 

Corea, China and Japan. 



334 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TWO-BOOK CARD. 



Several libraries in this country, and some abroad, allow two books 
to be taken on one card. Wherever tried it has been found to be a 
great convenience, and has given general satisfaction to the public. 

The card now in use in the Brookline Public Library contains the 
following instructions : ''Borrowers may take two books at the same 
time, provided that not more than one of these shall be a work of 
fiction, and that two new books shall not be taken." The card is 
divided in the middle; the left side has "Fiction" at the top, the 
right side '^ Other works." 

This arrangement permits a dessert with the meats, and gives a 
person opportunity of tasting of the notable literature of the day 
without giving up the delightful novel. It will reduce the time now 
spent by the reader in obtaining and returning his books, and would 
ultimately lead to a wider and more profitable range in his reading. 
I would recommend that it be given a trial in this library. 

CONCLUSION. 

In closing this report, I desire to express my grateful appreciation 
of the cordial good will and support that have been given me, not only 
by every member of this Board of Trustees, but by those who to so 
large an extent help to educate public opinion, — our local press. In 
many instances much help has been derived from it, not only directly 
by kindly criticism or commendation and by publishing our bulletins of 
new books and reading lists, but indirectly by calling particular atten- 
tion to books included in our catalogues, or by introducing topics 
which have induced the reader to consult books in the hbrary. This 
is as it should be. The library and the newspaper should be mutually 
helpful, and both seek for the furtherance of public intelligence and 
good morals. 

But, gentlemen, it is from your hands I have had the most imme- 
diate assistance and cheer. The careful, candid consideration that 
you have ever given to all my suggestions and plans, has given me 
added strength and fresh courage. Your hearty co-operation and well- 
matured advice has lightened my burdens and lessened my labors, and 
if during my administration, as the executive head of this library, any 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBR.\RV. o3o 

improvements have been made, and the library has been placed in 
closer touch with the people, or our books have exerted a greater edu- 
cational force in this community, to you, largely, the credit belongs. 

We have consulted together freely, and if our conclusions have not 
always been wise, certainly that cannot be chargeable to any lack of 
painstaking care on your part. Differences of opinion must be ex- 
pected, and are not always undesirable. Mistakes cannot be invariably 
avoided, but so long as there is an underlying sense of moral responsi- 
bility, the work as a whole must prove substantially praiseworthy. 

The ideal library has yet to be created, and it must be of gradual 
growth, the result of careful thought, united effort, and hard work — 
continued through many years. Our ideal may never be realized, but 
with a vigorous purpose to make use of all the means and material 
furnished us, an advance must be made which shall give better and 
still better results. We can, at least, keep in mind Browning's invig- 
orating declaration : 

" 'T is not what man does which exalts him, but what man would 
do." 

And so with eager activity and zeal we maybe faithful to our trust 
by putting ourselves into our work. Only such work deserves the 
praise of others, or the plaudits of our conscience. When Phidias, the 
great Grecian artist, made the shield of Minerva, he wrought his own 
image into the shield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN S. HAYES, Librarian, 
December 31, 1804. 



k 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER 

BOARD. 



(•21) 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, February 13, 1895. 

Referred to the Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, February 13, 1895. 

Referred to the Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the Water Board, February 2, 1895. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Ciri' Council : — 

Gentlemen, — The Somerville Mystic Water Board herewith 
presents its twenty-first annual report of the condition of the Water 
Department, being for the year ending December 31, 1894. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The Board organized on February 2, by re-election of George D. 
Wemyss as president, and Frank E. Merrill as clerk. Nathaniel 
Dennett was re-elected superintendent. 

FINANCIAL CONDITION. 

Cost of Water Works. 

The total cost of works on December 31, 1893, was . 8607,593.82 

Expended during the past year for construction . 28,375.67 



Total cost December 31, 1894 .... 8635,969.49 

WATER DEBT. 

The indebtedness of the city on account of the Water Works on 
December 31, 1893, was 8358,500 ; this debt has been reduced during 
1894 by the payment of bonds maturing July 1, and October 1, to the 
amount of 818,000, the water indebtedness being now represented by 
bonds drawing interest as follows : 

8248,000.00 at 4 per cent, per annum. 
82,500.00 " 5 '•' •'•' •'•' 
10,000.00 '' hh " " " 



340 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS. 

The following tables exhibit the receipts and expenditures for 
maintenance and extension of the Water Works during the year 
1894: 

Maintenance. 

Received, amount appropriated by City Council for 

'1894 $25,000.00 

Received, amount transferred from Extension account 5,000.00 

Received, amount transferred from Water Loan In- 
terest account ....... 2,500.00 

Received, collections from sundry accounts for labor 

and material ....... 196.93 

Received, balance from Water Service Assessments . 147.65 

Paid for maintenance of Water Works $31,936.90 

Amount expended in excess of appro- 
priation in 1893 .... $ 596.67 

Balance unexpended at end of year . 311.01 



$32,844.58 $32,844.58 

Extension. 

Received, unexpended balance from appropriation 

of 1893 $ 14.94 

Received, amount appropriated by City Council for 

1894 35,000.00 

Received, collections from sundry accounts for labor 

and material . . . . . . .^ 1,857.39 

Paid for Extension of Water Works $30,233.06* 

Transferred to Water Maintenance 

account 5,000.00 

Balance unexpended at end of year 1,639.27 



$36,872.33' $36,872.33 

SERVICES. 

It was decided by the Board early in the year to make a change in 
the system of putting in and paying for service pipes. Formerly the 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 341 

service pipes were laid from the street main to the building, and all 
material and labor were charged for, so that it frequently occurred that 
two or more service pipes of the same length would vary in cost, as 
there could be no fixed charge for the labor, thereby causing dissatis- 
faction. The service was not to be paid for until after the work was 
completed, and it often happened that the city was deprived of the 
payment for many months after the work was finished. Under the 
present system a uniform price of SI 5 is made for each service pipe; 
they are paid for when the application is made, and are laid by the 
city only to the property line. Three hundred and sixty-one new 
services were put in during the year, and we are pleased to say that 
the new arrangement has worked very satisfactorily. 

EXTENSION OF WORKS. 

For the four years ending December 31, 1803, over ten and one- 
fourth miles of cast-iron pipe were laid on extension of the works. 
It would appear from these figures that our undeveloped territory 
would soon be exhausted, but as evidence that progress in opening up 
available building sites is still being actively carried on, two and one- 
quarter miles have been laid in the year just closed, an increase of 
three thousand, four hundred feet over the previous year. 

Perhaps there is no truer barometer of the rapid growth of the 
city than this large extension of the works. 

Reference may be had to the report of the superintendent, here- 
with presented, for details of the pipe laid in extending the water 
works system. 

RELAYING WATER PIPES. 

The deplorable condition of the old cement pipe in our streets is 
indeed alarming. The employees are called out at all hours of the 
day and night to repair bursts ; oftentimes snow and ice have to be 
removed from the gate covere before the water can be shut off, while 
in the meantime a cellar is being flooded, or windows broken with a 
cyclone of water, gravel and mud : for it must be borne in mind that 
the debris will often drive with cyclonic force for over sixty feet from 
the break. Next comes the annoyance of settling damages, which 
are frequently quite heavy. The Board is apprehensive that, in case 



342 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

of fire, the extra strain on these old pipes will cause a break and leave 
our firemen powerless for want of water. The Board has used its 
utmost endeavor from year to year to replace the old cement with cast- 
iron pipe, but we feel that the appropriations have never been large 
enough for that purpose. There has been relaid during the last year 
about four and seven- eighths miles ; there are about eighteen miles yet 
to be relaid, and the safety of the city demands that it should be 
done at once. 

HYDRANTS. 

There has been a net increase of sixty-two hydrants during the 
year, making the total number now in the city six hundred and thirty. 
We again renew our recommendation that the expense of setting 
hydrants and keeping them in order be placed in the hands of the 
fire department. 

Experience has shown that familiarity with the construction and 
operation of our hydrants is a matter which cannot be too strongly 
urged upon our firemen. 

HIGH WATER SERVICE. 

Everything connected with the high water service continues to 
give entire satisfaction. It was found to be of great usefulness during 
what threatened to be a very serious fire in one of the wood-working 
establishments of our city. The fire department were delighted with 
the abundance of water furnished. 

All the wood-work of the pumping station has been scraped and 
refinished, giving the place a bright and clean appearance. 

WATER SUPPLY. 

In our last report we called attention to the fact that the Legisla- 
ture instructed the State Board of Health to examine into the question 
of Metropolitan water supply, and to report in the year 1895. 

Through the courtesy of the State Board of Health we were shown 
and had explained to us, on a large map, the proposed MetropoHtan 
system, and were much pleased with the thorough manner in which it 
had been investigated. At the present time Boston is constructing 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 343 

basin No. 5 at the head of the Sudbury system, and it is estimated 
that it will hold seven billion gallons, but this additional reservoir will 
be sufficient for not more than eight or ten years. The Metropolitan 
district, including Boston and suburbs within a radius of ten miles, has 
at present a population of one million, and in 1920 will, in all proba- 
bility, have reached two million people. 

The State Board of Health has completed its report, and has 
decided that the most available source of supply is to extend the Sud- 
bury system by tapping the Nashua river nine miles beyond basin No. 
5, and by forming an artificial lake at that point covering an area of 
six and one-half square miles, with an average depth of forty-six feet, 
which will hold sixty-three billions, sixty-eight millions gallons of 
water in reserve. Beyond this basin it is proposed to obtain future 
supplies from the Ware and Swift rivers, and it is possible to go even 
farther back and to touch the Deerfield river. This plan has been 
found, after careful surveys by competent engineers, to furnish an area 
larger than that covered by Lake Winnipesaukee ; it furnishes water 
which is equally pure and good, and the cost will be much less. 

It is estimated that the expense of connecting the Nashua river 
with the Sudbury system, and the formation of the proposed large 
reservoir would be S17,000,000, and that the investment would soon 
pay for itself in the increased demand for water. 

It must be quite evident to every water taker in Somerville that 
something must be done to procure not only a more abundant supply, 
but also water of better quality than that now furnished by the Mystic 
system. The proposed Metropolitan system will do both, and at much 
less expense than we are under now. We recommend that the city of 
Somerville do all in its power to bring about the completion of this 
work. 

GEORGE D. WEMYSS, 
GEORGE A. KIMBALL, 
WM. FRANKLIN HALL, 

Somerville Mystic Water Board. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To THE SOMERVILLE MySTIC WaTER BoARD : 

Gentlemen, — The annual report of the Superintendent of the 
Somerville Mystic Water Works is herewith submitted, with details of 
the work performed by this department during the year 1894. 

The tables hereto annexed show the location, size and number of 
feet of pipe extended and renewed ; the number and location of 
hydrants set and removed ; the location of all hydrants in use Dec. 
31, 1894; the number and location of gates set and removed; the 
number and locations of standpipes, and the number and locations of 
fountains in the city, also the number, size and length of service pipes 
laid in 1894. 

HIGH SERVICE. 

The high service continues to give excellent satisfaction. Several 
streets that were relaid with iron pipe in 1894 have been added to 
the district covered by the high service, and seventeen additional 
hydrants have been included. 

DISTRIBUTION MAINS. 

A number of important thoroughfares were relaid with cast iron 
pipe, and the domestic and fire service have been greatly improved 
thereby, but a large number of streets are still in a condition that 
imperatively demands relaying with iron pipe the coming season. 

Two miles, 1,344 feet, of cast-iron pipe were laid on construction 
account, and 4 miles, 4,657 feet, were laid in place of old cement-lined 
pipe abandoned. 

There still remains in the city 23 miles, 1,916 feet, of cement-lined 
pipe. 

The total length of distribution mains now in the city is 69 miles, 
4,947 feet. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



345 



CONSTRUCTION TABLE. 
New Pipe, Gates, Hydrants, and Standpipes. 





Pipe 


Laid. 


Gates. 


Hydrants. 








Size. 




Size. 




Size. 


= 




Feet. 


Inches. 


No. 


Inches. 


No. 


Inches. 


'jr. 


Adams street .... 


10 


6 




.. 




6 




Adrian street .... 


, , 


, . 


1 


6 


. . 


, , 


• • 


Ames street .... 


6 


6 


. . 


. . 




6 




Avon street .... 


G 


(', 




. . 




6 




Avon street .... 


100 


10 


, , 


. . 




• • 




Banks street .... 


52 


8 


, . 


. . 




, . 




Bartlett street (south from Med- 
















ford street) 


18 


6 


. . 




2 


6 




Bartlett street (south from Broad- 
















^vay) 


298 


6 


1 


() 




6 




Beech street .... 


345 


6 


. . 






6 




Bleachery court 


38 


2 


. . 




. . 


• • 




Bradley street 


278 


i; 


] 


6 




6 




Bradley street 


204 


8 












Burnside avenue 


239 


8 


. . 


. . 








Cedar avenue .... 


55 


6 


. . 


. , 








Central street .... 





12 


. . 


. . 








Centre street .... 


219 


6 


1 


6 








Chandler street 


. , 


. . 


1 


6 








Claremon street 


6 


6 


. . 


. . 


1 


4 




Concord avenue 


21 


6 


, , 


. . 


•J 


6 




Cook street .... 


3 


4 




. . 


1 


4 




Cottage avenue 






1 


6 






Craigie street .... 


6 


4 


. . 






. . 


Craigie street .... 


9 


6 


. . 


. . 




6 


Cutter avenue 


96 


6 


1 


6 




. . 


Elm place .... 




. . 


1 


4 




. . 


Elm street .... 


05 


6 


. . 


. . 




6 


. . 


Elm street (near Burnside ave.) 


23 


2 


. . 


. . 




. . 


1 


Elm street (opp. Kenwood st.) 


6 


2 


. . 


. . 




. . 


1 


Francesca avenue 


7 


»; 


. . 


. . 




6 




Francesca avenue . 


33 


8 


1 


8 








Fremont street 


115 


6 


1 


C, 




<; 




Fremont street 


567 


8 








. , 




Gordonia Road 


16 


(j 








. , 




Gorham street 


6 


6 








6 




Hall avenue .... 


7 


6 








6 




Hall avenue .... 


431 


8 






, , 


, . 




Hancock street 


100 


8 


1 


8 


, , 






Harvard street 


1 


6 


. . 


. . 




6 




Harvard street (by-pass) 






1 


8 




. . 




Hawthorne street . 


158 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 




Highland avenue 


24 


6 


. , 


. , 




6 




Holland street 


29 


2 


• • 


. . 




. . 


1 


Irving street .... 


8 


6 




. . 




6 




Jenny Lind avenue 


266 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 




Kent street .... 


76 


12 


1 


12 








Laurel court .... 


169 


2 




, . 


. . 


• • 




Lexington avenue . 


52 


4 


1 


4 








Liberty avenue 


218 


8 








* • 




Linden avenue 


285 


4 


1 


4 


■■ 







346 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



CONSTRUCTION TABLE. — Continued. 
New Pipe, Gates, Hydrants, and Standpipes. 









Pipe 


Laid. 


Gates. 


Hydrants. 


■ "S, 






Size. 




Size. 




Size. 


c 

OS 




Feet. 


Inches. 


No. 


Inches. ' 


No. 


Inches. 


tio 


Linden avenue 


21 


6 




.. 


2 


6 




Lowell street . 






16 


12 


. , 


. . 


. . 






Marshall street 






42 


6 


1 


10 


3 


6 




Meacham street 






8 


6 


. . 




1 


6 




Meacham street 






504 


8 


1 


8 




. . 




Mead street . 






20 


6 


1 


6 


1 


4 




Medford street 






18 


6 


1 


12 


1 


6 




Melvin street . 






62 


6 


. . 


. . 








Melvin street . 






72 


8 


. . 


. , 


. . 






Minnie avenue 






722 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 




Moore street . 






150 


6 


. . 


. . 


2 


4 




Moreland street (north 


from 


















Meacham) 






153 


6 


1 


6 








Moreland street (south 


from 


















Meacham) . 






100 


10 


. . 


. . 








Mortimer place 






100 


6 


. . 


. . 








Mossland street 






7 


6 




. . 


1 


6 




Munroe street 






16 


6 


. . 


. . 


1 


6 




Orchard street 






18 


6 


1 


8 


1 


6 




Park avenue . 






6 


6 


. . 


. . 


1 


6 




Pearl terrace . 






143 


2 


, . 


. . 








Pembroke street 






62 


6 


1 


6 








Richdale avenue 






55 


6 


1 


6 








Russell street . 






283 


6 












Sacramento street . 






10 


6 






1 


6 




School street . 






7 


6 






1 


6 




Snow terrace . 






120 


2 












Somerville avenue . 






20 


6 






2 


6 




Spring street . 






7 


6 






1 


6 


. . 


Staniford terrace 






21-8 


6 


1 


6 








Staniford terrace (blow-o 


ff) 




. . 




1 


4 








Summer street 






40 


4 


. . 




4 


4 




Summer street 






34 


6 


. . 




4 


6 




Summer street 






891 


10 


1 


10 




^ 




Sycamore street 






602 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 




Sycamore street 






3 


8 












Tower street . 






600 


8 


1 


8 








Tower street . 






7 


6 






1 


6 




Veazie street . 






342 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 




Vernon street 








. 


1 


4 








Wallace street 






35 


6 


1 


8 


2 


6 




Walter street . 






7 


4 






1 


4 




Walter street , 






563 


6 


2 


6 


1 


6 




Walter place . 






214 


6 


1 


6 








Walter place (blow-off) 






8 


4 


1 


4 








Ware street 






132 


6 












Washington street . 






9 


6 






1 


6 




Wyatt street . 






3 


4 






1 


4 




Wheeler street 






293 


4 


2 


4 








Winter street . 






6 


6 






1 


6 




Woodbine street 






472 


6 




• • 


1 


6 





REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



347 



RENEWAL TABLE.— Main Pipe, Gate, and Hydrants. 



Adams street 
Adams street 
Ashland street 
Avon street 
Beech street 
Beech street 
Behnont street 
Central street 
Chandler street 
Cherry street 
Cherry street 
Claremon street 
Craigie street 
Craigie street 
Elm street 
Elm street 

Elm street, standpipe 
Elm place 
Evergreen avenue 
Harvard street 
Highland avenue 
Highland avenue 
Highland avenue 
Howe street 
Irving street . 
Irving street . 
Lincoln avenue 
Loring street . 
Lowell street . 
Linden avenue 
Marshall street 
Mead street 
Moore street . 
Mossland street 
Orchard street 
Park avenue . 
Pitman street . 
Porter street 
Prescott street 
Sacramento street 
School street . 
Somerville avenue 
Somerville avenue 
Spring street . 
Summer street 
Summer street 
Thurston street 
Vinal avenue . 
Wallace street 
Webster street 
Winter street . 



Main Pipe. 



Gates. 



Hydrants. 



Size. 



Aban. Relaid 





4" 


6" 




4" 


8" 




3" 


6" 




i" 


6" 




7" 


8" 




4" 


8" 




12" 


]2" 




4" 


(J" 




4" 


8" 




4" 


6" 




4" 


0" 




4" 


6" 




4" 


8" 




6" 


6" 




6" 


12" 




2" 


. . . 




3" 


4" 




i" 


6" 




6" 


8" 




6" 


6" 




6" 


8" 




8" 


12" 




4" 


6" 




4" 


6" 




6" 


8" 




4" 


4" 




6" 


8" 




4" 


8" 




6" 


10" 




4" 


6" 




4" 


6" 




4" 


12" 




4" 


8" 




4" 


6" 




4" 


6" 




4" 


8" 




6" 


8" 




e" 


12" 




4" 


10" 




6" 


6" 




6" 


19" 




4" 


8" 




4" 


6" 




6" 


10" 




'e'' 


8" 




6" 


8" 




'in 


6''' 



Length ^B^^- 

in Feet. .. „. 

iNo.i Size. 



413 

47 

21 

778 

27 

80 

389 

GO 

18 

58.5 

15 

1,319 

36 

2,750 

6 

13 

27 

781 

70 

60 

2,775 

27 

24 

1,182 



6 

14 

1,122 

1,674 

270 

574 

394 

1,000 

516 

52 

61 

34 

60 

313 

30 

1,690 

428 

118 

4,055 

40 
1,360 



456 



4" 
8" 
4" 

4" 

4" 

4" 

12" 



4" 
4" 
4" 



4" 
6" 



4" 
6" 



8" 

4" 



6" 
4" 
6" 



4" 
4" 



4" 

4" 
4" 



6" 
4" 



6" 
4" 



6" 



Reset. 



Aban. 



Reset. 



Nc 



Size. No., Size. No. Size. 



6" 

6" 

8" 

8" 

12" 



8" 
6" 
6" 



8" i... 

12" : 4 



6" 

8" 



12" 
6" 



8" 

8" 

10" 



1 6" 
1 12" 



6" 
6" 



12" 
10" 



12" 

ft'/ 



10' 



4" 
4" 



4" 
4" 
6" 



4" 
4" 
4" 



6" 



4" 
4" 



6" 
6" 



6" 
6" 

8" 



6" 
6" 
6" 



6" 



4" 
6" 



6" 



I 1 



348 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION OF PIPE LAID IN 1894. 









Diameter 


Length 


Street. 


From, 


To. 


in Inches. 


in Feet. 


Central 


At junction of . 


Highland ave. . 


12 


6 


Kent 


Somerville ave. 


Southerly 


12 


76 


Lowell 


Connection 


At Somerville ave. 


12 


16 




98 


Avon 


1892 


Southeasterly . 


10 


100 


Moreland . 


1891 


Northeasterly . 


10 


100 


Summer 


Cherry street 


WilloM'^ ave. 


10 


891 




1,091 


Banks 


1893 


Northeasterly . 


8 


52 


Bradley 


1890 


Northeasterly . 


8 


204 


Burnside ave. 


1893 


Northeasterly , 


8 


239 


Francesca ave. . 


1890 


Liberty ave. 


8 


33 


Fremont 


6" laid in 1894 . 


Northeasterly . 


8 


567 


Hall ave, . 


1893 


Southeasterly . 


8 


431 


Hancock . 


1893 


Summer street , 


8 


100 


Liberty ave. 


Francesca ave. . 


Southwesterly . 


8 


218 


Meacham . 


Fremont street . 


Minnie ave. 


8 


504 


Melvin 


1893 


Southwesterly . 


8 


72 


Sycamore . 


Connection 


At Highland ave. 


8 


3 


Tower 


Highland ave. . 


Crown street 


8 


600 
3,023 


♦Adams 






6 


10 


♦Ames 


• • • 


... 


6 


6 


♦Avon 


• • • 


. 


6 


6 


Bartlett 


Broadway . 


Southwesterly . 


6 


298 


♦Bartlett . 




• . • 


6 


18 


Beech 


Spring street 


Harvard street . 


6 


345 


Bradley 


8" laid in 1894 , 


Walter street 


6 


278 


Cedar ave. 


Connection 


At Linden ave. 


6 


55 


Centre 


Albion street 


Woodbine street 


6 


219 


♦Claremon 




. 


6 


6 


♦Concord ave. . 


. 


. 


6 


21 


♦Craigie 




• • • 


6 


9 


Cutter ave. 


1892 


Highland ave. . 


6 


96 


♦Elm 


• > • 


. 


6 


65 


♦Francesca ave. 


. 


. 


6 


7 


Fremont 


1890 ! 


Northeasterly . 


6 


115 


Gordonia road. . 


Connection 


At Summer street 


6 


16 


♦Gorham . 


• • • 


• • • 


6 


6 


♦Hall ave. 


• • • 


• • • 


6 


7 


♦Harvard 


• • • 


• • 


6 


7 


Hawthorne 


Cutter ave. 


Southeasterly . 


6 


158 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



349 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION OF PIPE LAID IN 1894. — Continued. 



Street. 


From. 


To. 


, Diameter 
; in Inches 


1 

; Length 

in Feet. 


* Highland ave. . 






f. 


24 


*Irving 


. 


. 


6 


' 8 


Jenny Lind ave. 


1892 


Broadway 


G 


2GG 


*Linden ave. 


. 


. 


! G 


21 


* Marsh all 


, , 


• ... 


G 


1 42 


*Meacham 




. ... 


G 


i '^ 


Mead 


6" laid in 1894 


Southeasterly . 


G 


' 20 


*Medford . 


, . 


• • • • 


G 


18 


Melvin 


80 feet north fr 
Bonair street 


^"^ Northeasterly . 


G 


02 


Minnie ave. 


Meacham street 


Northeasterly . 


G 


i 722 


Moore 


6" laid in 1894 


Mead street 


6 


150 


Morelancl . 


Meacham street 


Northeasterly . 


r; 


' 1.53 


Mortimer place . 


Walter street 


Northerly 


G 


100 


*Mossland 


. 


• 


1 ^' 


7 


*Munroe . 


. 


. 


6 


IG 


^Orchard . 


. , 


. 


G 


IS 


*Park ave. . 


. , 


• ... 


G 


■ G 


Pembroke . 


1874 


Sycamore street 


G 


G2 


Richdale ave. 


1888 


Sycamore street 


6 


o~y 


Russell 


Orchard street 


Cottage ave. 


G 


283 


*Sacramento 


. 


. 


G 


10 


*School 


. 


. . 


G 


7 


*Somerville ave. 


, , 


. ... 


G 


20 


*Spring 


. 


. 


G 


7 


Stanford terrace 


Beacon street 


Northeasterly . 


6 


218 


*Summer . 


. 




G 


34 


Sycamore . 


Medford street . 


Richdale ave. . 


G 


G02 


*Tower 


. . . 




<> 


7 


Veazie 


James street 


Northwesterly . 


G 


342 


* Wallace . 


. 


• • 


G 


35 


Walter 


Walnut street . 


Mortimer place . 


G 1 


5G3 


Walter place 


Walter street 


Southwesterly . 


6 i 


214 


Ware 


1888 


Northwesterly . 


G ! 


132 


* Washington 




... 


G 


9 


* Winter . 


, 


... 


G 


G 


Woodbine . 


Centre street 


Northwesterly . 


6 


472 




6,4G7 


*Cook 






4 


3 


*Craigie 


. . . 


« . . 


4 


6 


Lexington ave. . 


At Fanning ave. 


For blow-off 


4 


52 


Linden ave. 


Summer street . 


Cedar ave. 


4 


285 


* Summer . 




• • ■ 


4 


40 


* Walter 




• • 


4 


7 


Walter place 


At end of place 


For blow-off 


4 


8 



350 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION OF PIPE LAID IN 1%^^.— Cone hide a. 



Street. 


From. 


To. 


Diameter 
in Inches. 


Length 
in Feet. 


Wheeler 
*Wyatt 

Bleachery court 
Elm . 
Elm . 
Holland . 
Laurel ave , . 
Pearl terrace 
Snow terrace 

Total len^ 


^th 


Mt. Vernon street 

Connection 
At Burnside ave. 
At Kenwood street 
At Elmwood street 
Laurel street 
Pearl street 
Jaques street 

of Pipe laid 


Pinckney street 

At Somerville ave. 
For standpipe . 
For standpipe . 
For standpipe . 
Northwesterly . 
Northeasterly . 
Southwesterly . 


4 
4 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


293 
3 

697 

38 

23 

6 

29 

169 

143 

120 

528 

11,904 



'Hydrant branch. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



351 



TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION OF PIPE RELAID IN 1894. 



Street. 


From. 


To. 


Size. 


Length. 








Aban- 




in Feet. 








doned. 


Relaid. 
8" 




Adams 


Medford street 


Northeasterly 


4" 


413 


*Adams 


• . . • 


. 


4" 


6" 


1 


Ashland 


Connection 


At Summer street 


3" 


6" 


47 


Beech 


Connection 


At Somerville ave. 


4" 


6" 


21 


Beech 


Somerville ave. . 


Spring street 


4" 


8" 


778 


Belmont 


Connection 


At Somerville ave. 


4" 


8" 


27 


Central 


North of Highland ave. 


South of Highland ave. 


12" 


12" 


80 


Chandler . 


Park ave. 


Northeasterly 


4" 


6" 


389 


Cherry 


North of Summer st. 


South of Summer st. 


4" 


8" 


60 


Cherry 


Connection 


At Elm street 


4" 


6" 


18 


Claremon . 


Holland street 


Mead street 


4" 


6" 


585 


Craigie 


Somerville ave. . 


Summer street 


4" 


8" 


1,334 


Elm 


Craigie street 


Willow ave. 


6" 


12" 


2,7.50 


*Elm 


. . . ■ 


.... 


6" 


6" 


36 


Elm place . 


Connection 


At Harvard street 


3" 


4" 


13 


Evergreen ave. 


Connection 


At Marshall street 


4" 


6" 


27 


Harvard 


Beech street 


Summer street 


6" 


8" 


781 


Highland ave. 


Walnut street 


Central street 


8" 


12" 


2,775 


*Highland ave. 


, 


. 


6" 


8" 


60 


♦Highland ave. 


. . . 




6" 


6" 


70 


Howe 


Connection . 


At Marshall street 


4" 


6" 


27 


Irving 


Broadway . 


Holland street 


6" 


8" 


1,182 


*Irving 


.... 


. 


4" 


6" 


24 


*Loring 


• 




4" 


4" 


6 


Lowell 


Connection . 


At Summer street 


6" 


8" 


.14 


Linden ave. 


Elm street . 


Summer street 


4" 


8" 


1,122 


Marshall . 


Pearl street 


Broadway . 


6" 


10" 


1,674 


Mead 


Moore street 


East of Claremon st. 


4" 


6" 


270 


Moore 


Holland street 


Near Mead street 


4" 


6" 


574 


Mossland . 


Elm street . 


Somerville ave. . 


4" 


12" 


394 


Orchard 


Day street . 


Russell street 


4" 


is" 


1,000 


Park ave, . 


Wallace street 


Near Elm street . 


4" 


6" 


516 


Pitman 


Connections 


At Beech & Spring sts. 


4" 


6" 


52 


Porter 


Connections 


At Elm & Summer sts. 


4" 


8" 


61 


Prescott 


Connection 


At Highland ave. 


6" 


8" 


34 


Sacramento 


Connection 


At Somerville ave. 


6" 


12" 


60 


School 


Highland ave. 


Madison street 


4" 


10" 


313 


Somerville ave. 


Near Central street 


Craigie street 


6"&8" 


12" 


1,690 


♦Somerville ave. 






6" 


6" 


30 


Spring 


Somerville ave. 


Beech street 


4" 


8" 


428 


Summer 


West of Preston street 


Cherry street 


6" 


10" 


4,055 


*Summer . 


. 




4" 


6" 


118 


Vinal ave. . 


Connection 


At Highland ave. 


6" 


8" 


40 


Wallace 


Holland street 


Broadway . 


6" 


8" 


1,360 


Winter 


Holland street 


Near Elm street . 


. 4" 


6" 


456 


Total 


25,771 



^Hydrant branch. 



352 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

HYDRANTS. 

Extension. 
New hydrants have been set in the following locations : — 
Adams street, 6-inch P. & C, 10 feet north from Medford street. 
Ames street, 6-inch P. & C, 131 feet west from Central street. 
Avon street, 6-inch P. & C, 235 feet east from Central street. 
Bartlett street, 6-inch P. & C, 230 feet south from Broadway. 
Bartlett street, 6-inch Holyoke, 15 feet south from Ames street. 
Bartlett street, 6-inch P. & C, 10 feet south from Robinson street. 
Beech street, 6-inch Holyoke, 4 feet south from Atherton street. 
Bradley street, 6-inch Holyoke, 28 feet south from Veazie street. 
Claremon street, 4-inch Bigelow, 252 feet south from Holland street. 
Concord avenue, 6-inch Holyoke, opposite Knapp Schoolhouse. 
Cook street, 4-inch B. M., 74 feet north from Wyatt street. 
Craigie street, 6-inch Holyoke, 126 feet north from Somerville avenue. 
Craigie street, 6-inch Holyoke, 216 feet from Summer street. 
Elm street, 6-inch Holyoke, west corner Porter street. 
Elm street, 6-inch Holyoke, 11 feet east from Mossland street. 
Elm street, 6-inch Holyoke, 153 feet east from Cherry street. 
Elm street, 6-inch Holyoke, 16 feet east from Burnside avenue. 
Francesca avenue, 6-inch Holyoke, corner Liberty avenue. 
Fremont street, 6-inch P. & C, 287 feet north from Meacham street. 
Gorham street, 6-inch P. & C, 305 feet south from Holland street. 
Hall avenue, 6-inch P. & C, 306 feet west from Liberty avenue. 
Harvard street, 6-inch Holyoke, 22 feet north from Harvard place. 
Hawthorne street, 6-inch P. & C, 141 feet east from Cutter street. 
Highland avenue, 6-inch Holyoke, .114 feet west from School street. 
Irving street, 6-inch Holyoke, 187 feet north from Holland street. 
Jenny Lind avenue, 6-inch P. & C, 220 feet south from Broadway. 
Linden avenue, 6-inch Holyoke, 550 feet north from Elm street. 
Linden avenue, 6-inch Holyoke, 30 feet north from Olive avenue. 
Marshall street, 6-inch Holyoke, 94 feet north from Gilman square. 
Marshall street, 6-inch Holyoke, 30 feet north from Stickney avenue. 
Marshall street, 6-inch Holyoke, 104 feet south from Mortimer place. 
Meacham street, 6-inch P. & C, 14 feet west from Moreland street. 
Mead street, 4-inch Bigelow, 48 feet east from Claremon street. 
Medford street, 6-inch P. & C, 14 feet west from Jenny Lind avenue. 



I 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 353 

Minnie avenue, 6-inch P. & C, 300 feet north from Meacham street. 
Moore street, 4-inch B. M., 22 feet south from Holland street. 
Moore street, 4-inch B. M., 330 feet south from Holland street. 
Mossland street, 6-inch Holyoke, 112 feet north from Somerville ave. 
Munroe street, 6-inch P. & C, 206 feet east from Walnut street. 
Orchard street, 6-inch' Holyoke, corner Mason avenue. 
Park avenue, 6-inch Holyoke, 10 feet west from Chandler street. 
Sacramento street, 6-inch P. & C, 5 feet south from Miller street. 
School street, 6-inch Holyoke, 124 feet north from Highland avenue. 
Somerville avenue, 6-inch Holyoke, 194 feet west from Spring street. 
Somerville avenue, 6-inch Holyoke, 77 feet west from Belmont street. 
Spring street, 6-inch Holyoke, 10 feet south from Pitman street. 
Summer street, 4-inch B. M., 16 feet west from Laurel street. 
Summer street, 4-inch B. M., 59 feet east from Central street. 
Summer street, 4-inch B. M., 217 feet east from Harvard street. 
Summer street, 4-inch B. M., east corner Belmont street. 
Summer street, 6-inch B. M., opposite Craigie street. 
Summer street, 6-inch Holyoke, 24 feet east from Linden avenue. 
Summer street, 6-inch P. & C, west corner Gordonia road. 
Summer street, 6-inch P. & C, opposite Banks street. 
Sycamore street, 6-inch Holyoke, 175 feet south from Medford street. 
Tovv^r street, 6-inch Holyoke, 13 feet north from Crown street. 
Veazie street, 6-inch Holyoke, opposite James street. 
Wallace street, 6-inch Holyoke, corner Holland street. 
Wallace street, 6-inch Holyoke, 694 feet south from Broadway. 
Walter street, 6-inch Holyoke, 20 feet west from Walnut street. 
Walter street, 4-inch Bigelow, 50 feet west from Bradley street. 
Washington street, 6-inch B. M., 190 feet east from Parker street. 
Winter street, 6-inch Holyoke, 120 feet east from Holland street. 
Woodbine street, 6-inch P. & C, 221 feet west from Centre street. 
Wyatt street, 4-inch B. M., 322 feet east from Washington street. 

Nine 6-inch P. & C. hydrants have also been set by the North 
Packing & Provision Co. in their yard for fire protection. 

Maintenance. 

The following changes have been made in the kind and location 
of hydrants : — 

Avon street, 6-inch Pratt & Cady hydrant, set in place of 4-inch 
Boston Mach., removed from same location. 
(22) 



354 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Beech street, 6-inch Pratt & Cady hydrant, set 30 feet east from 
Spring street, to replace 4-inch Boston Mach. hydrant, removed from 
corner Spring street. 

Elm street, 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 56 feet west from Craigie 
street, to replace 4-inch Bigelow hydrant, removed from 275 feet west 
from Craigie Street. 

Elm street, 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 28 feet east from Linden 
ave., to replace 4-inch Holyoke hydrant, removed from corner Linden 
ave. 

Elm street, 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 109 feet west from Cherry 
street, to replace 4-inch Holyoke, removed from 6 feet west from 
Cherry street. 

Elm street, 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 104 feet east from Willow 
ave., to replace 4-inch Boston Mach. hydrant, removed from 58 feet 
east from Willow ave. 

Harvard street, 6-inch Pratt & Cady hydrant, set 13 feet north from 
Beech street, to replace 4-inch Boston Mach., remoyed from same 
location. 

Highland ave., 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 260 feet west from 
Walnut street, to replace 4-inch Bigelow, removed from 88 feet east 
from Vinal ave. 

Highland ave., 8-inch Chapman hydrant, set 44 feet east from Put- 
nam street, to replace 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, removed from 73 feet 
west from Vinal ave. 

Highland ave., 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 47 feet west from 
Prescott street, to replace 4-inch Boston Mach., removed from west 
corner Prescott street. 

Highland ave., 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 409 feet west from 
School street, to replace 4-inch Holyoke hydrant, removed from 318 
feet west from School street. 

Highland ave., 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 115 feet west from 
Trull lane, to replace 4-inch Bigelow hydrant, removed from 114 feet 
east from Sycamore street. 

Highland ave., 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 171 feet east from 
Central street, to replace 4-inch Boston Mach. hydrant, removed from 
corner Central street. 

Irving street, 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 357 feet north from 
Holland street, to replace 4-inch Boston Mach. hydrant, removed from 
400 feet north from Holland street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 355 

Lincoln ave., G-inch Holyoke hydrant, set opposite George street, 
to replace 4-inch BDSton Mach. hydrant, removed from same location. 

Loring street, 6- inch Coffin hydrant, set 282 feet north from 
Somerville ave., to replace 4-inch flush hydrant, removed from 280 feet 
north from Somerville ave. 

Marshall street, G-inch Pratt & Cady hydrant, set opposite Howe 
street, to replace 4-inch Boston Mach. hydrant, removed from same 
location. 

Somerville ave., 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 61 feet east from 
Spring street, to replace 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, removed from corner 
Spring street. 

Somerville ave., G-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 112 feet west from 
Lowell street, to replace G-inch Holyoke hydrant, removed from cor- 
ner Lowell street. 

Summer street, 4-inch Boston Mach. hydrant, set 53 feet west 
from Harvard street, to replace 4-inch Bigelow hydrant, removed from 
corner Harvard street. 

Summer street, 4-inch Holyoke hydrant, set 35 feet east from Por- 
ter street, to replace 4-inch Holyoke, removed from corner Porter 
street. 

Thurston street, 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set corner Evergreen 
ave., to replace 4-inch Boston Mach. hydrant, removed from same 
location. 

Webster street, 6-inch Holyoke hydrant, set corner Rush street, 
to replace 6-inch Coffin hydrant, removed from same location. 

Hydrants in Adrian street, Chauncy avenue, Curtis street, Ham- 
mond street. Jay street, Linden avenue, Webster avenue, have been 
taken out for repairs, and other hydrants of the same make and size 
set in their old locations. 

Fourteen hydrants have been removed for repairs, and reset; 21 
have been repaired at the shop and fitted with new valves, bolts, etc. 
All have been thoroughly oiled, and have received necessary attention. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Number of public hydrants set in 1894 .... 88 

Number of private hydrants set in 1894 .... 9 

Total number of hydrants set in 1894 .... 97 

Number of public hydrants removed in 1894 ... 23 



356 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Net increase in number of hydrants in 1894 ... 74 

" "■ public hydrants in 1894 . . 65 

" " private hydrants in 1894 . . 9 

Total number of hydrants in the city . . . . . 642 

" public hydrants in the city . . . 607 

'' private hydrants in the city ... 35 

One hundred and one hydrants are on the high service. 

TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION OF HYDRANTS, 
DECEMBER 31, 1894. 

Adams street, corner of Broadway. 
Adams street, 240 feet south of Broadway. 
Adams street, 300 feet north of Medford street. 
Adams street, 10 feet north from Medford street. 
Adrian street, 106 feet east of Marion street. 
Adrian street, 220 feet south of Joseph street. 
Allen street, 9 feet north of Charlestown street. 
Albion street, 78 feet west of Central street. 
Albion street, 312 feet west of Central street. 
Albion street, 234 feet east of Lowell street. 
Albion street, 421 feet east of Cedar street. 
Aldersey street, 200 feet west of Walnut street. 
Alpine street, 280 feet east of Cedar street. 
Alpine street, 670 feet east of Cedar street. 
Allston street, 12 feet west of Shawmut place. 
Ames street, 133 feet west from Central street, 
Appleton street, corner of Clifton street. 
Appleton street, 39 feet west of Willow avenue. 
Arthur street, 29 feet south of Broadway. 
Auburn avenue, 519 feet west of Cross street. 
Austin street, 82 feet south of Mystic avenue. 
Austin street, ^^ feet north of Benedict street. 
Avon street, 233 feet east from Central street. 
Avon street, 585 feet west of School street. 
Bartlett street, 230 feet south from Broadway. 
Bartlett street, 15 feet south from Ames street. 
Bartlett street, 10 feet south from Robinson street. 
Beacon street, 300 feet east of west end of street. 
Beacon street, 84 feet east of Harris street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 35" 

Beacon street, 46 feet west of Sacramento street. 
'Beacon street, 15 feet west of Kent street. 
Beacon street, corner of Ivaloo street. 
Beacon street, 72 feet east of Park street. 
Beacon street, 22 feet east of Durham street. 
Beacon street, 260 feet east of Washington street. 
Beacon street, 219 feet west of Cooney street. 
Beacon street, 222 feet west of Buckingham street. 
Beech street, 4 feet south from Atherton street. 
Beech street, 31 feet east from Spring street. 
Behiiont street, 554 feet south of Highland avenue. 
Belmont street, 228 feet north of Pitman street. 
Belmont street, 255 feet north of Summer street. 
Benedict street, 34 feet east of Mystic street. 
Berkeley street, 8 feet east of Central street. 
Berkeley street, 213 feet east of Hersey street. 
Berkeley street, 28 feet west of School street. 
Berkeley street, 212 feet west of Hersey street. 
Billingham street, 129 feet north of William street. 
Bonair street, opposite Autumn street. 
Bonair street, 62 feet east of Walnut street. 
Bonner avenue, opposite Homer square. 
Boston street, 90 feet west of Bigelow street. 
Boston street, 213 feet east of Bigelow street. 
Boston street, 4 feet north of High street. 
Bow street, 125 feet west of Union square. 
Bow street, junction of Summer street. 
Bow street, opposite Bow street place. 
Bowdoin street, 68 feet north of Fremont avenue. 
Bradley street, 26 feet south from Veazie street. 
Brastow avenue, 200 feet east of Porter street. 
Broadway, 50 feet east of Mt. Pleasant street. 
Broadway, 28 feet west of George street. 
Broadway, 21 feet west of Broadway place. 
Broadway, corner of Glen street. 
Broadway, 15 feet west of Cross street. 
Broadway, 33 feet west of Walnut street. 
Broadway, 250 feet west of Edmands street. 
Broadway, 174 feet west of Grant street. 



358 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Broadway, opposite Marshall street. 
Broadway, corner of School street. 
Broadway, opposite School street. 
Broadway, corner of Thurston street. 
Broadway, 240 feet east of Central street. 
Broadway, 13 feet west of Norwood avenue. 
Broadway, 324 feet west of Hinckley street. 
Broadway, 424 feet west of Hinckley street. 
Broadway, opposite Cedar street. 
Broadway, 180 feet west of Wilson avenue. 
Broadway, 40 feet west of Packard avenue. 
Broadway, 180 feet east of Endicott avenue. 
Broadway, 175 feet east of North street. 
Broadway, 415 feet west of North street. 
Broadway, east corner of Mt. Vernon street. 
Broadway, west corner of Franklin street. 
Brook street, 18 feet west of Rush street. 
Buckingham street, west corner of Dimick street. 
Bennett street, 150 feet east of Prospect street. 
Cameron avenue, opposite Mead street. 
Cameron avenue, 438 feet south of Mead street. 
Cedar street, 289 feet north of Elm street. 
Cedar street, 90 feet north of Sartwell avenue. 
Cedar street, 50 feet north of Hall street. 
Cedar street, 14 feet north of Highland avenue. 
Cedar street, 14 feet north of Albion street. 
Cedar street, 124 feet south of Warwick street. 
Cedar street, 50 feet north of Clyde street. 
Cedar street, 24 feet south of Murdo'ck street. 
Cedar street, 270 feet south of Broadway. 
Central street, 75 feet south of Broadway. 
Central street, 6 feet north of Forster street. 
Central street, 9 feet north of Vernon street. 
Central street, 200 feet south of Vernon street. 
Central street, 8 feet north of Albion street. 
Central street, corner of Summer street. 
Chandler street, 16 feet south of Broadway. 
Chandler street, 216 feet north of Park avenue. 
Charnwood road, 100 feet east of Gordonia road. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 359 

Chauncey avenue, feet north of Jaques street. 

Chester street, 15 feet north of Chester place. 

Chestnut street, 538 feet south of Poplar street. 

Chestnut street, 246 feet south of Poplar street. 

Church street, feet south of Summer street. 

Church street, 327 feet south of Summer street. 

Church street, 16 feet south of Somerville avenue. 

City stables, east end of yard. 

Claremon street, 252 feet south from Holland street. 

Clarendon avenue, at Cambridge City ledge (south side). 

Clark street, 200 feet west of Newton street. 

Clyde street, south corner of Murdock street. 

Campbell park, 255 feet west of Meacham street. 

Charles street, 183 feet south of Washington street. 

Columbus avenue, 150 feet east of Bonner avenue. 

Columbus avenue, 123 feet west of Bonner avenue. 

Columbus avenue, 35 feet west of Stone avenue. 

Columbus avenue, 8 feet east of Walnut street. 

Concord avenue, 90 feet east of Concord square. 

Concord avenue, opposite Knapp Schoolhouse. 

Concord avenue, 30 feet east of Springfield street. 

Concord avenue, 20 feet east of Wyatt street. 

Conwell avenue, 465 feet west of Curtis street. 

Cook street, 74 feet north from Wyatt street. 

Cottage avenue, 150 feet east of Russell street. 

Craigie street, 216 feet south from Summer street. 

Craigie street, 555 feet south of Summer street. 

Craigie street, 126 feet north from Somerville avenue. 

Crescent street, opposite Hadley street. 

Cross street, corner of Otis street. 

Cross street, corner of Pearl street. 

Cross street, 16 feet north of Oilman street. 

Curtis street, 146 feet north of Professors' row. 

Curtis street, opposite Raymond avenue. 

Curtis street, 100 feet north of Fairmount avenue. 

Cutter square, north side. 

Cutter street, 290 feet south of Broadway (south line). 

Dane street, 9 feet north of Tyler street. 

Dane street, 112 feet south of Skehan street. 



360 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Dane street, 55 feet north of Skehan street. 

Dane court, 510 feet east of Dane street. 

Dartmouth street, 312 feet south of Broadway. 

Dartmouth street, 57 feet south of Evergreen avenue. 

Dartmouth street, 180 feet north of Medford street. 

Day street, 3 feet south of Davis square. 

Day street, 100 feet south of Herbert street. 

Day street, corner of Orchard street. 

Dell street, 275 feet west of Glen street. 

Delaware street, 270 feet east of Aldrich street. 

Derby street, 399 feet east of Temple street. 

Dickinson street, 12 feet east of Beacon street. 

Dover Street, 205 feet south of Davis square. 

Dover street, 129 feet south of Glover circle. 

Dover street, 3 feet north of Orchard street. 

Durham street, 54 feet south of Hanson street. 

Elm street, 56 feet west of Craigie street. 

Elm street, west corner of Porter street. 

Elm street, 28 feet east from Linden avenue. 

Elm street, 11 feet east from Mossland street. 

Elm street, 9 feet west of Cedar street. 

Elm street, 153 feet east from Cherry street. 

Elm street, 110 feet west of Cherry stre-€t. 

Elm street, 14 feet east from Burnside avenue. 

Elm street, 101 feet east of Willow avenue. 

Elm street, east corner of St. James avenue. 

Elm street, west corner of Elston street. 

Elm street, opposite Tenney street. 

Elm street, 25 feet west of Russell street. 

Elm street, 18 feet west of Grove street. 

Elm street, 86 feet west of Chester street. 

Elm street, 10 feet north of Winter street. 

Elm street, 6 feet south of Morrison street. 

Elm street, 69 feet south of William street. 

Elm street, opposite Kenwood street. 

Elm street, corner of Broadway. 

Elmwood street, 450 feet south of Holland street. 

Eliot street, corner of Park street. 

Endicott avenue, 430 feet south of Broadway. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 361 

Evergreen avenue, 8 feet east of School street. 
Everett avenue, 200 feet east of Dana street. 
Everett street, opposite Emerson street. 
Fairmount avenue, 590 feet west of Curtis street. 
Farragut avenue, 258 feet south of Broadway. 
Farragut avenue, 550 feet south of Broadway. 
Fiske avenue, 126 feet east of Hinckley street. 
Fitchburg street, 400 feet east of Linwood street. 
Flint street, 18 feet east of Flint avenue. 
Florence street, 222 feet south of Perkins street. 
Florence street, 486 feet north of Washington street. 
Forster street, opposite Tennyson street. 
Francesca avenue, 305 feet east of Elm street. 
Francesca avenue, 7 feet west of Liberty avenue. 
Frankl 
Frankl 
Frankl 



n street, 14 feet north of Arlington street, 
in street, 80 feet south of Webster street, 
n street, 165 feet south of Pearl street. 



Franklin street, 87 feet south of Oliver street. 
Franklin street, 96 feet south of Palmer avenue. 
Franklin street, 29 feet north of Washington street. 
Fremont street. 86 feet north of Main street. 
Fremont street, 350 feet north of Main street. 
Fremont street, 285 feet north from Meacham street. 
Frost avenue, opposite American Tube Works. 
Fountain avenue, 280 feet west of Glen street. 
Garden court, 475 feet south of Somerville avenue. 
Gibbens street, 206 feet west of Central street. 
Gibbens street, 129 feet west of Benton avenue. 
Gilman street, 240 feet east of Walnut street. 
Gilman square (southeast side). 
Gilman street, 180 feet east of Aldrich street. 
Glen street, 9 feet north of Brooks street. 
Glen street, corner of Flint street. 
Gorham street, 307 feet south from Holland street. 
Gorham street, corner of Howard street. 
Grand View avenue, 288 feet east of Vinal avenue. 
Greene street, 200 feet south of Summer street. 
Greenville street, 148 feet north of Boston street. 
Greenville street, 33 feet north of High street. 



362 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Hall avenue, 200 feet east of Elm street. 
Hall avenue, 306 feet west from Liberty avenue. 
Hamlet street, 321 feet south of Highland avenue. 
Hammond street, 30 feet west of Dickinson street. 
Hancock street, 258 feet south of Summer street. 
Hanson street, 40 feet north of Skehan street. 
Harvard street, 13 feet north of Beech street. 
Harvard street, 23 feet north from Harvard place. 
Harrison street, 100 feet east of Kent street. 
Hawkins street, 50 feet east of Lake street. 
Hawthorne street, 139 feet east from Cutter avenue. 
Hawthorne street, 340 feet west of Willow avenue. 
Heath street, 51 feet west of Temple street. 
Heath street, 320 feet west of West street. 
Heath street, corner of Bond street. 
Heath street, corner of Moreland street. 
Henderson street, 159 feet north of Wilton avenue. 
Herbert street, 192 feet east of Day street. 
High street, 300 feet west of Boston street. 
Highland avenue, corner of Medford street. 
Highland avenue, corner of Walnut street. 
Highland avenue, 260 feet west of Walnut street. 
Highland avenue, 41 feet east from Putnam street. 
Highland avenue, 47 feet west from Prescott street. 
Highland avenue, 114 feet west from School street. 
Highland avenue, 410 feet west of School street. 
Highland avenue, 115 feet west from Trull lane. 
Highland avenue, 171 feet east from Central street. 
Highland avenue, 28 feet west of Belmont street. 
Highland avenue, 180 feet west of Lowell street. 
Highland avenue, corner of Porter street. 
Highland avenue, corner of Eastman place. 
Highland avenue, 36 feet east of Fanning avenue. 
Highland avenue, corner of Willow avenue. 
Highland avenue, 6 feet west of Grove street. 
Highland avenue, 60 feet east of Davis square. 
Holland street, 42 feet west of Dover street. 
Holland street, 36 feet east of Winter street. 
Holland street, 105 feet west of Irving street. 



REPORT OF JHE WATER BOARD. 363 

Holland street, 77 feet east of Elmwood street. 
Holland street, 117 feet west of Cameron avenue. 
Holland street, 80 feet east of Newbury street. 
Homer square, west side of square. 
Houghton street, 200 feet east of Springfield street. 
Hudson street, 292 feet east of Lowell street. 
Hudson street, 8 feet east of Porter street. 
Irving street, 6 feet south of Broadway. 
Irving street, 300 feet south of Broadway. 
Irving street, 537 feet north of Holland street. 
Irving street, 183 feet north from Holland street. 
James street, 100 feet north of Pearl street. 
Jaques street, 9 feet north of Grant street. 
Jaques street, 362 feet east of Temple street. 
Jaques street, 190 feet west of Temple street. 
Jaques street, 300 feet east of Bond street. 
Jay street, 90 feet north of Howard street. 
Joy street, 36 feet south of Washington street. 
Joy street, 440 feet south of Washington street. 
Joy street, 28.3 feet north of Poplar street. 
Jenny Lind avenue, corner of Vernon street. 
Jenny Lind avenue, 220 feet south from Broadway. 
Jenny Lind avenue, 16 feet north of Vernon street. 
Jenny Lind avenue, 467 feet north of Vernon street. 
Kent court, 285 feet west of Kent street. 
Kingman court, 300 feet south of Washington street. 
Kmgston street, 402 feet west of Meacham street. 
Knowlton street, opposite Morton street. 
Lake street, 205 feet west of Hawkins street. 
Lake street, corner of Carleton street. 
Laurel street, 300 feet south of Summer street. 
Laurel street, 8 feet north of Park place. 
Lawrence street, 9 feet south of Richardson street. 
Lincoln street, opposite Arlington street. 
Lincoln avenue, 224 feet west of Mt. Vernon street. 
Linden street, 33 feet north of Charlestown street. 
Linden street, 557 feet south of Somerville avenue. 
Linden avenue, 243 feet north of Elm street. 
Linden avenue, 550 feet north from Elm street. 



364 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Linden avenue, 30 feet north from Olive avenue. 
Line street, 500 feet west of Cooney street. 
Linwood street, 416 feet south of Washington street. 
Linwood street, 225 feet north of Poplar street. 
Linwood street, 55 feet south of London street. 
Linwood street, corner of Linwood place. 
London street, 400 feet east of Linwood street. 
Loring street, 273 feet north of Somerville avenue. 
Lowell street, corner of Fiske avenue. 
Lowell street, 195 feet south of Richardson street. 
Lowell street, opposite Vernon street. 
Lowell street, 665 feet south of Summer street. 
Madison street, 480 feet west of School street. 
Main street, 116 feet west of Mt. Vernon avenue. 
Main street, corner of Moreiand street. 
Mansfield street, 200 feet north of Somerville avenue. 
Mansfield street, 200 feet south of Washington street. 
Maple street, 220 feet east of Medford street. 
Maple street, 9 feet north of Poplar street. 
Marshall street, 94 feet north from Oilman square. 
Marshall street, 30 feet north from Stickney avenue. 
Marshall street, opposite Howe street. 
Marshall street, corner of Evergreen avenue. 
Marshall street, 104 feet south from Mortimer place. 
Marshall street, 200 feet south of Broadway. 
Malloy court, 16 feet south of Somerville avenue. 
Meacham street, corner of Orchard street. 
Meacham street, 50 feet south of Glover circle. 
Meacham street, at Lowell Railroad fence line. 
Meacham street, 13 feet west from Moreiand street. 
Mead street, 48 feet east from Claremon street. 
Medford street, junction of Broadway. 
Medford street, 14 feet west from Jenny Lind avenue. 
Medford street, 16 feet from corner of Central street. 
Medford street, 16 feet east of Sycamore street. 
Medford street, 46 feet east of Thurston street. 
Medford street, corner of School street. 
Medford street, junction of Pearl street. 
Medford street, 8 feet east of Greenville street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 365 

Medford street, 13 feet west of Prospect Hill avenue. 

Medford street, 34 feet south of Central square. 

"Medford street, opposite Chester avenue. 

Medford street, 236 feet south of Washington street. 

Medford street, 78 feet north of Maple street. 

Medford street, 21 feet north of Somerville avenue. 

Medford street, 98 feet north of Fitchburg R. R. 

Medford street, 70 feet south of Fitchburg R. R. 

Medford street, 30 feet north of Ward street. 

Medford street, 91 feet south of Ward street. 

Medford street, 93 feet north of Warren street. 

Medford street, 17 feet south of Warren street. 

Medford street, 80 feet southeast of Grand Junction R. R. 

Merriam street, 42 feet north of Charlestown street. 

Melrose street, 600 feet north of Mystic avenue. 

Miner street, 142 feet north from Vernon street. 

Minnie avenue, 300 feet north from Meacham street. 

Mondamin court, junction of Harrison street. 

Montrose street, 417 feet west of School street. 

Moore street, 21 feet north of Mead street. 

Moore street, 22 feet south from Holland street. 

Moore street, 332 feet south from Holland street. 

Morrison street, 13 feet west of Newbern street. 

Morrison street, 195 feet west of Clifton street. 

Morrison street, 33 feet west of Grove street. 

Mossland street, 112 feet north from Somerville avenue. 

Munroe street, 206 feet east from Walnut street. 

Murdock street, 200 feet east of Cedar street. 

Mt. Vernon avenue, 200 feet north of Heath street. 

Mt. Vernon street, 9 feet north of Pearl street. 

Mt. Vernon street, corner of Broadway. 

Mt. Pleasant street, 276 feet south of Broadway. 

Myrtle street, 418 feet north of Washington street. 

Myrtle street, 82 feet south of Pearl street. 

Mystic avenue, corner of Union street. 

Mystic avenue, 200 feet north of North Union street. 

Mystic avenue, near Medford line. 

Nashua street, 215 feet south of Wilton street. 

Newbury street, 570 feet south of Holland street. 



366 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Newbury street, 965 feet south of Holland street. 
Norfolk street, corner of Webster avenue. 
North street, 440 feet north of Raymond avenue. 
North street, 190 feet north of CityBound No. 19. 
North Union street, 300 feet north of Mystic avenue. 
Oak street, 390 feet west of Prospect street. 
Oakland avenue, 230 feet west of Marshall street. 
Oliver street, 183 feet east of Cross street. 
Oliver street, 15 feet east of Glen street. 
Orchard street, 9 feet west of Russell street. 
Orchard street, corner of Mason avenue. 
Orchard street, 9 feet east of Chester street. 
Otis street, 9 feet east of Dana street. 
Oxford street, 358 feet west of School street. 
Oxford street, 100 feet west of Hersey street. 
Park avenue, 90 feet west of Elm street. 
Park avenue, 10 feet west from Chandler street. 
Park street, 69 feet north of Fitchburg R. R. 
Park street, 155 feet north of Beacon street. 
Partridge avenue, 26 feet north of Medford street. 
Partridge avenue, 126 feet south of Medford street. 
. Partridge avenue, 450 feet south of Medford street. 
Partridge avenue, 290 feet north of Vernon street. 
Pearl street, corner of Pinckney street. 
Pearl street, 69 feet west of Hillside avenue. 
Pearl street, 18 feet east of Delaware street. 
Pearl street, 9 feet west of Glen street. 
Pearl street, 30 feet west of Dana street. 
Pearl street, corner of Wigglesworth street. 
Pearl street, corner of Walnut street. 
Pearl street, 120 feet east of Marshall street. 
Perkins street, opposite Myrtle street. 
Perkins street, opposite Lincoln street. 
Perkins street, 63 feet east of Perkins place. 
Perkins street, 21 feet east of Mt. Pleasant street. 
Pinckney street, 345 feet south of Pearl street. 
Pleasant avenue, 290 feet east of Vinal avenue. 

rescott street, 326 feet south of Highland avenue. 
Prescott street, 582 feet south of Highland avenue. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 

Prescott Street, 257 feet north of Summer street. 
Preston street, 375 feet west of School street. 
Poplar street, 21 feet west of Joy street. 
Porter street, corner of Mountain avenue. 
Porter street, 24 feet north of Williams court. 
Professors' row, 140 feet west of College avenue. 
Professors' row, 300 feet west of College avenue. 
Professors' row, 580 feet west of College avenue. 
Professors' row, 188 feet east of Packard avenue. 
Professors' row, 305 feet west of Packard avenue. 
Prospect Hill avenue, 9 feet north of High street. 
Prospect street, 135 feet north of Bennet street. 
Prospect street, corner of Webster avenue. 
Prospect street, 210 feet south of Oak street. 
Putnam street, 116 feet south of Highland avenue. 
Putnam street, 425 feet south of Highland avenue. 
Putnam street, 608 feet north of Summer street. 
Putnam street, 308 feet north of Summer street. 
Quincy street, 315 feet south of Summer street. 
Quincy street, corner of Somerville avenue. 
Richardson street, 12 feet west of Henderson street. 
Richdale avenue, opposite Thurston street. 
Robinson street, 333 feet west of Central street. 
Rogers' avenue, 300 feet north of Morrison avenue. 
Rossmore street, 260 feet south of Washington street. 
Rush street, 81 feet south of Pearl street. 
Sacramento street, 5 feet south from Miller street. 
Sanborn avenue, 60 feet east of Walnut street. 
Sargent avenue, 36 feet north of Mills street. 
School street, 108 feet south of Maple avenue. 
School street, 8 feet south of Montrose street. 
School street, 128 feet north from Highland avenue. 
School street, 88 feet north of Oxford street. 
School street, 88 feet north of Avon street. 
School street, 100 feet south of Summer street. 
School street, 93 feet south of Preston street. 
School street, 61 feet north of Knapp street. 
Sewall street, 324 feet west of Grant street. 
Somerville avenue, 181 feet west of Mossland street. 



168 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Somerville avenue, 195 feet east of Beaconstreet bridge. 
Somerville avenue, 500 feet east of Beaconstreet bridge. 
Somerville avenue, 120 feet west of Elm street. 
Somerville avenue, 112 feet west of Lowell street. 
Somerville avenue, 77 feet west from Belmont street. 
Somerville avenue, 69 feet east from Spring street. 
Somerville avenue, opposite Spring street. 
Somerville avenue, 195 feet west from Spring street. 
Somerville avenue, 13 feet west of Beech street. 
Somerville avenue, 9 feet east of Central street. 
Somerville avenue, 15 feet west of Laurel street. 
Somerville avenue, 100 feet west of Loring street. 
Somerville avenue, 113 feet east of Dane street. 
Somerville avenue, 185 feet west of Hawkins street. 
Somerville avenue, 88 feet west of Quincy street. 
Somerville avenue, 105 feet east of Carleton street. 
Somerville avenue, 400 feet west of Prospect street. 
Somerville avenue, 83 feet west of Prospect street. 
Somerville avenue, 30 feet west of Linden street. 
Somerville avenue, 12 feet east of Mystic street. 
Somerville avenue, 121 feet east of Medford street. 
Somerville avenue, 86 feet east of Poplar street.' 
Somerville avenue, 490 feet west of Fitchburg R. R. 
Somerville avenue, 100 feet west of Fitchburg R. R. 
Somerville avenue, south side of Fitchburg R. R. 
Somerville avenue, 260 feet west of Franklin court. 
Somerville avenue, corner of Franklin court. 
Somerville avenue, 100 feet west of Cambridge line. 
Summer street, 160 feet east of Cutter avenue. 
Summer street, west corner of Gordonia road. 
Summer street, opposite Banks street. 
Summer street, 6 feet east of Cherry street. 
Summer street, 6 feet east of Cedar street. 
Summer street, 24 feet east from Linden avenue. 
Summer street, opposite Craigie street. 
Summer street, 35 feet east from Porter street. 
Summer street, corner of Lowell street. 
Summer street, east corner of Belmont street. 
Summer street, corner of Spring street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 369 

Summer street, 53 feet west from Harvard street. 
Summer street, 215 feet, east from Harvard street. 
Summer street, 59 feet east from Central street. 
Summer street, 19 feet west from Laurel street. 
Summer street, 54 feet east of Preston street. 
Summer street, 200 feet west of School street. 
Summer street, 8 feet east of School street. 
Summer street, opposite Putnam street (east line). 
Summer street, 6 feet west of Vinal avenue (west line). 
South street, 234 feet west of Medford street. 
South street, corner of Emery street. 
South street, corner of Earle street. 
Spring street, 10 feet south from Pitman street. 
Springfield street, 140 feet south of Concord avenue. 
Springfield street, 21 feet south of Dickinson street. 
Springfield street, 120 feet north of Cambridge line. 
Summit avenue, 120 feet west of Walnut street. 
Sunnyside avenue, 105 feet west of Wigglesworth street. 
Sycamore street, 18 feet south of Broadway. 
Sycamore street, 360 feet south of Broadway. 
Sycamore street, corner of Forster street. 
Sycamore street, 213 feet north of Medford street. 
Sycamore street, 174 feet south from Medford street. 
Stickney avenue, 212 feet west of Marshall street. 
Sydney street, 412 feet east of Temple street. 
Talbot avenue, corner of Packard avenue. 
Temple street, 53 feet north of Jaques street. 
Tenney court, 318 feet north of Mystic avenue. 
Thurston street, 6 feet north of Evergreen avenue. 
Tower street, 16 feet north from Crown street. 
Tremont street, corner of Webster avenue. 
Trull street, 264 feet north of Vernon street. 
Tufts street, 75 feet north of Washington street. 
Tufts street, 48 feet west of Glen street. 
Tufts street, 54 feet east of Cross street. 
Thorndike street, 10 feet south of Boston & Lowell R. R. 
Thorpe place, 280 feet south of Highland avenue. 
Tyler street, 50 feet east of Vine street. 
Union square, corner of W^ashington street. 
(23) 



370 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Union square, west side of square. 
Veazie street, opposite James street. 
Vernon street, 75 feet west of Partridge avenue. 
Vinal avenue, 129 feet north of Aldersey street. 
Vinal avenue, 219 feet north of Summer street. 
Vinal avenue, corner of Highland avenue. 
Vine street, 180 feet north of Beacon street. 
Virginia street, 45 feet west of Aldrich street. 
Wallace street, 40 feet south of Broadway. 
Wallace street, 480 feet south of Broadway. 
Wallace street, 694 feet south from Broadway. 
Wallace street, 175 feet north of Park avenue. 
Wallace street, 10 feet north of Holland street. 
Walnut street, 38 feet south of Veazie street. 
Walnut street, 92 feet south of Wellington avenue. 
Walnut street, 36 feet north of Pleasant avenue. 
Walnut street, 12 feet south of Boston street. 
Walter street, 28 feet west from Walnut street. 
Walter street, 50 feet v/est from Bradley street. 
Ward street, 84 feet west of Medford street. 
Ward street, corner of Emery street. 

Ware street, 258 feet west of Curtis street. 

Warren avenue, corner of Sanborn avenue (north side) 

Warjren avenue, 75 feet south of Columbus avenue. 

Warren avenue, 175 feet north of Bow street. 

Warwick street, 420 feet east of Cedar street. 

Washington street, 69 feet west of Crescent street. 

Washington street, corner of Mt. Vernon street. 

Washington street, corner of Florence street. 

Washington street, corner of Myrtle street. 

Washington street, 15 feet west of Myrtle street. 

Washington street, 20 feet east of Franklin avenue. 

Washington street, 50 feet east of Shawmut street. 

Washington street, 100 feet east of Rossmore street. 

Washington street, 84 feet east of Boston street. 

Washington street, 75 feet west of ]\Iystic street. 

Washington street, corner of Clark place (west side). 

Washington street, opposite Union square. 

Washington street, 6 feet east of Kingman court. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



371 



Washington street, 240 feet east from Parker street. 
Washington street, 96 feet west of Parker street. 
Washington street, 9 feet east of Leland Street. 
Washington street, 186 feet west of Dane street. 
Washington street, 45 feet east of Beacon street. 
Webster avenue, 96 feet south of Union square. 
Webster avenue, 12 feet south of Everett street. 
Webster avenue, 25 feet north of Newton street. 
Webster avenue, 63 feet north of Prospect street. 
Webster avenue, 275 feet south of Prospect street. 
Webster street, 9 feet east of Rush street. 
Webster street, 12 feet west of Cutter street. 
Wellington avenue, west of Montgomery avenue. 
Wheatland street, 135 feet north of Broadway. 
Wheatland street, 9 feet south of Jaques street. 
Wheatland street, 100 feet south of Mystic avenue. 
Wigglesworth street, corner of Otis street. 
Willow avenue, 12 feet north of Summer street. 
Willow avenue, 250 feet north of Highland avenue. 
Willow avenue, 66 feet south of Morrison street. 
Winter street, 130 feet east from Holland street. 
Winter Hill circle, 200 feet north of Broadway. 
West street, corner of Highland avenue. 
West street, 144 feet north of Highland avenue. 
Wilton street, 6 feet east of Nashua street. 
Wilton street, 12 feet east of Lawrence street. 
Winslow avenue, 66 feet east of Villa avenue. 
Woodbine street, 222 feet west from Centre street. 
Wyatt street, 42 feet west of Cook street. 
Wyatt street, 324 feet east from Washington street. 

Private Hydr.\xts. 



J Willi J- . OV^UllU . . 

North Packing Co. 






1 

11 


McLean Asvlum 






4 


Middlesex Bleachery 






3 


American Tube Works . 






2 


Union Glass Works 






1 


Fitchburg R. R. . 






1 


New England Dressed Meat and W 


ool Compa 


ny 


6 



372 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

GATES. 

. Extension. 

New gates have been set in the following locations : — 

Adrian street, 6-inch, south side, 120 feet north from Marion street. 

Bradley street, 6-inch, south line of Walter street, 13 feet out, east 
side. 

Bartlett street, 6-inch, south line of Broadway, 13 feet out, west 
side. 

Centre street, 6-inch, north line of Albion street, 13 feet out, west 
side. 

Chandler street, 6-inch, north line of Park avenue, 13 feet out, west 
side. 

Cottage avenue, 6-inch, north line of Orchard street, 13 feet out. 

Cutter avenue, 6-inch, south line of Highland aveaue, 12 feet out, 
east side. 

Elm place, 4-inch, west line Harvard street, north side, 8J feet out. 

Francesca avenue, 8-inch, west line of Liberty avenue, 13 feet out, 
north side. 

Fremont street, 6-inch, west side, 188 feet south from north line 
of Meacham street, and 1 6 feet out. 

Hancock street, 8-inch, east side, on south line Summer street, 13 
feet out. 

Harvard street, 8-inch, north side, 13^ out, and 16f feet north 
from south line of Beech street. 

Hawthorne street, 6-inch, east line of Cutter avenue, 10 feet out 
from south side. 

Jenny Lind avenue, 6 -inch, south line of Broadway, 13 feet out on 
west side. 

Kent street, 12-inch, south line Somerville avenue, 13 feet out on 
east side. 

Lexington avenue, 4-inch, 21 feet out from south line of Lexing- 
ton avenue, and 26 feet east from east line of Fanning avenue (for 
blow-off). 

Linden avenue, 4-inch, north line of Summer street, 13 feet out 
on west side. 

Marshall street, 10-inch, south line of Mortimer place, 13|- feet out 
on east side. 

Meacham street, 8-inch, east line of Fremont street, 13 feet out 
on north side. 

Mead street, 6-inch, west line of Claremon street, 13 feet out on 
north side. 

Medford street, 12-inch, west line of Hennessey court, 25 J feet 
out on south side. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 373 

Minnie avenue, G-inch, 8 feet north from north line of Meacham 
street, 13 feet out on east side. 

Moreland street, 6-inch, north Hne of Meacham street, 13 feet out 
on east side. 

Orchard street, 8- inch, west line of Chester street, 13§ feet out 
on south side. 

Pembroke street, G-inch, west line of Sycamore street, 13 feet out 
on south side. 

Richdale avenue, 6-inch, east line of Sycamore street, 12^ feet out 
on south side. 

Staniford terrace, 6-inch, north line of Beacon street, 8^ feet out 
on east side. 

Staniford terrace, 4-inch, 148 feet north from north line of Beacon 
street, and 10 feet out on east side (for blow-off). 

Summer street, 10-inch, west line of Cherry street, 16 feet out on 
north side. 

Sycamore street, 6-inch, south line of Medford street, 13 feet out 
on east side. 

Tower street, 8-inch, south line of Highland avenue, 13 feet out 
on east side. 

Vernon street, 4-inch, 20 feet north from east line of Jenny Lind 
avenue, and 17 feet out on north side. 

Veazie street, 6-inch, east line of Bradley street, 13 feet out on 
north side. 

Wallace street, 8-inch, south line of Broadway, 14J feet out on 
west side. 

Walter street, G-inch, west line of Walnut street, 13 feet out on 
north side. 

Walter street, 6-inch, east line of Mortimer place, 13 feet out on 
north side. 

Walter place, 6 inch, east line of Walter street, 13 feet out on east 
side. 

Walter place, 4-inch, 187 J feet south from Walter street, and 13 
feet out on east side (for blow-off). 

Wheeler street, 4-inch, west line of Pinckney street, 13 feet out on 
east side. 

Wheeler street, 4-inch, east line of Mt. Vernon street, 13 feet out 
on east side. 

Maintexance. 

The following changes have been made in the size and location of 
main gates : — 

Adams street, 8-inch gate, set en north line of Medford street, in 
place of 4-inch gate removed from same location. 



374 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Adams street, 4-inch gate, removed from 409 feet north from 
Medford street. 

Ashland street, 6-inch gate, set on south Une of Summer street, 11 
feet out on east side, in place of 4-inch removed. 

Beech street, 6-inch gate, set on north line of Somerville avenue, 

12 feet out on east side, in place of 4-inch removed. 

Beech street, 8-inch gate, set on west line of Harvard street, 13 
feet out, in place of 4-inch gate removed. 

Belmont street, 8-inch gate, set on north line of Somerville avenue, 

13 feet out on west side, in place of 4-inch gate removed. 

Central street, 12-inch gate, set on south line of Highland avenue, 
14 J feet out on east side, in place of 12-inch gate removed from 
centre of Highland avenue. 

Cherry street, 6-inch gate, set on north line of Elm street, 14 feet 
out on east side, in place of 4-inch gate removed. 

Cherry street, 8-inch gate, set on north line of Summer street, 13 
feet out on east side, in place of 4-inch gate removed. 

Cherry street, 8-inch gate, set on south line of Summer street, 15^ 
feet out on east side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Claremon street, 6-inch gate, set on south line of Holland street, 
13 feet out on east side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Craigie street, 8-inch gate, set on north line of Elm street, 14 feet 
out on west side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Craigie street, 8-inch gate, set on south line of Summer street, 14J- 
feet out on west side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Craigie street, 4-inch gate, removed from old main, 300 feet north 
from Somerville avenue. 

Elm street, 12-inch gate, set 1 foot west from east line of Linden 
avenue, 22 feet out on north side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

Elm street, 12-inch gate, set on west line of Cherry street, 18J 
feet out on north side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

Elm street, 6-inch gate, removed from old main on west line of 
Craigie street. 

Elm street, 6-inch gate, removed from old main on east line Willow 
avenue. 

Evergreen avenue, 6-inch gate, set on west line of Marshall street, 
12|^ feet out on north side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Harvard street, 8-inch gate, set on south line of Summer street, 13 
feet out on west side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

Harvard street, 8-inch gate, set on north line of Beech street, 13J 
feet out on west side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

Harvard street, 6-inch gate, removed from old main on south line 
of Elm place. 

Highland avenue, 12-inch gate, set on east line of Putnam street, 
21 feet out on north side, to replace 8-inch gate removed from Walnut 
street. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 375 

Highland avenue, 12-inch gate, set on east Ime of Trull lane, 21 
feet out on north side, to replace 8-inch gate removed. 

Highland avenue, 12-inch gate, 18 feet west from east line of 
Central street, 21 feet out on north side, to replace 8-inch gate 
removed. 

Highland avenue, 12-inch gate, set on by-pass at Central street, to 
replace 8-inch gate removed. 

Highland avenue, 8-inch gate, removed from old main on east line 
of School street. 

Howe street, 6-inch gate, set on west line of Marshall street, 12 
feet out on north side, to replace 4-inch removed. 

Irving street, 8-inch gate, set on north line of Holland street, 15 
feet out on west side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

Irving street, 8-inch gate, set on north line of house No. 52, 14^ 
feet out on west side, to replace 6-inch removed from same location. 

Lowell street, 8-inch gate, set 1 foot south from north line of Sum- 
mer street, 13 feet out on west side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

Linden avenue, 8-inch gate, set on south line of Summer street, 13 
feet out on west side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Linden avenue, 8-inch gate, set on north line of Elm street, 13 
feet out on west side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Marshall street, 10-inch gate, set on south line of Mortimer place, 
12f out on east side, to replace 6-inch gate removed from north line 
of Mortimer place. 

Moore street, 6-inch gate, set on south line of Holland street, 13 
feet out on east side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Mossland street, 12-inch gate, set on south line of Elm street, 13 
feet out on west side, to replace 4-inch gate removed from same 
location. 

Park avenue, 6-inch gate, set on east line of Wallace street, 13 
feet out on north side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Park avenue, 6-inch gate, set on west line of Elm street, 13 feet 
out on north side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Pitman street, 6-inch gate, set on west line of Beech street, 10 feet 
out on south side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Pitman street, 6-inch gate, set on east line of Spring street, 10 
feet out on south side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Porter street, 8-inch gate, set on north line oi Elm street, 13 feet 
out on west side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Porter street, 8-inch gate, set on south line of Summer street, 14 
feet out on west side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Sacramento street, 12-inch gate, set on south line of Somerville 
avenue, 13 feet out on west side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

School street, 10-inch gate, set on north line of Highland avenue, 
16|- feet out on west side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 



O/b ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Somerville avenue, 12-inch gate, set on east line of Sacramento 
street, 21 feet out on north side, to replace 6-inch gate removed from 
west line of Sacramento street. 

Spring street, 8-inch gate, set on north line of Somerville avenue, 
13 feet out on west side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Summer street, 10-inch gate, set 2 feet east from east line of 
Spring street, 16f feet out on north side, to replace 6-inch gate re- 
moved. 

Summer street, 10-inch gate, set on east Hne of Central street, 12i 
feet out on north side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

Summer street, 6-inch gate, removed from old main on west line 
of Central street. 

Summer street, 10-inch gate, set 3|- feet west from west line of 
Belmont street, 16|- feet out on north side,* to replace 6-inch gate re- 
moved. 

Summer street, 10-inch gate, set on west line of Porter street, 16 
feet out on north side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

Summer street, 10-inch gate, set on west line of Cedar street, 16 
feet out on north side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

Summer street, 10-inch gate, set on east line of Cedar street, 16 
feet out on north side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

Wallace street, 8-inch gate, set on north line of Holland street, 
14J feet out on west side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

Wallace street, 8-inch gate, set opposite house No. 52, 13 feet out 
on west side, to replace 6-inch gate removed. 

Winter street, 6-inch gate, set on west line of Elm street, 11 feet 
out on south side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 

Winter street, 6-inch gate, set on east line of Holland street, 11 
feet out on south side, to replace 4-inch gate removed. 



RECAPITULATION. 



GATES. 


SIZE. 


4-Inch. 


6-Inch. 


8-Inch. 


10-Inch. 


12-Inch. 


Total. 


Set 


8 
28 


34 
22 


26 
6 


10 




12 

1 


9 




57 







Net increase in number of gates in 1894, 33. 

Total number of gates in the city Dec. 31, 1894, 787. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



377 



SERVICES. 

Service pipes, by the rule adopted early in the year, are now laid 
by the city only from the street main to the property line, thus largely 
reducing, from former years, the number of feet run by the city. 

The following table shows the size, number and length of these 
laid in 1894: 





1 
Size. ) Number. 


Length. 




3" 

2" 
1" 


1 

2 

8 

355 


21 feet. 
49 " 
121 " 
7,537 '♦ 


Total 




861 


7,728 feet. 



Total number of service pipes now in the city, eight thousand, 
one hundred and fifty-seven. 

Total length of pipe used, fifty-three miles, three thousand, nine 
hundred and eleven feet. 

Repairs were made on one hundred and seventy-nine services ; fish 
cleared from thirty-four ; sediment removed from thirty-one ; two 
hundred and forty-three service boxes were found in decayed con- 
dition and were replaced by new iron boxes ; two hundred and fifty 
boxes were brought up to grade. Eleven services were replaced by 
new ones, the expense, $186.53, being borne by the owners : ten were 
replaced by new ones at the expense of the city. Water was turned 
off and on for repairs one hundred and nineteen times, and a charge 
of 81,00 for each time was made for this work. 

BURSTS ON CEMENT MAINS. 

The usual results have occurred from the rapidly deteriorating 
cement pipes still in the city streets, and we have to record the fol- 
lowing bursts for 1894 : 





SIZE OF PIPE. 




1-In-ch. 


4-Inch. 


6-Inch. 


S-Inch. 


10-Inch. 


I-2-Inch. 


16-I^XH 


Total. 


Number of bursts. . . . 
Number of leaks 


1 


15 


14 
4 


5 
1 


1 


1 


1 


37 
6 



378 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

STANDPIPES. 

Three new standpipes were set in 1894, in the following locations : 
Elm street, near Burnside avenue ; Elm street, opposite Kenwood 
street, and Holland street, near Elmwood street. One was removed 
from Elm street, near Broadway, making a net increase in the city of 
two, and a total number of thirty-eight. All are in good condition, 
having received the usual renewals of boxes, valves, hose, and general 
repairs. 

LOCATIONS OF STANDPIPES. 

Beacon street, opposite Cooney street. 
Beacon street, near Sacramento street. 
Broadway, near corner of Franklin street. 
Broadway, opposite Broadway park. 
Broadway, corner of Clarendon avenue. 
Concord avenue, corner of Marion street. 
Elm street, near Burnside avenue. 
Elm street, near Morrison street. 
Elm street, opposite Kenwood street. 
Highland avenue, corner of Medford street. 
Highland avenue, corner of Central street. 
Highland avenue, near Willow avenue. 
Holland street, near Elmwood street. 
Linwood street, near Poplar street. 
Main street, near Broadway. 
Medford street, corner of Lee street. 
Medford street, near Magoun square. 
Mystic avenue, corner of Union street. 
Pe.arl street, corner of Walnut street. 
Pearl street, near Delaware street. 
Pinckney street, corner of Pearl street. 
Putnam street, corner of Summer street. 
School street, near Broadway. 
Somerville avenue, near East Cambridge line. 
Somerville avenue, near Poplar street. 
Somerville avenue, corner of Mystic street. 
Somerville avenue, near School street. 
Somerville avenue, corner of Beacon street. 
Spring street, near Somerville avenue. 
Summer street, opposite Laurel street. 
Summer street, corner of Cedar street. 
Summer street, corner of Elm street. 
Tufts street, corner of Cross street. 
Vinal avenue, near Highland avenue. 



REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD. 



379 



Washington street, corner of Myrtle street. 
Washington street, corner of Boston street. 
Washington street, near Union square. 
Washington street, opposite Leland street. 

DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

One new drinking fountain was set in 1894, the location being in 
Russell square. The total number now in the city is nine, located as 
below. All were cleaned regularly during the summer months, and 
are in good repair. 

LOCATION OF DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

Broadway, opposite Broadway park. 

Highland avenue, corner of Walnut street. 

Oilman square, in centre. 

Somerville avenue, junction with Washington street. 

Union square, in front of Hill building. 

Broadway, north side of Magoun square. 

Davis square, in centre. 

Davis square, in front of Medina building. 

Russell square, junction of Broadway and Holland street. 

STOCK ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1895. 



Cast-Iron Pipe 
Special Castings 
Gates . 
Hydrants . 
Service Material 
Sundry Material 



value 83,383.76 
1,676.10 
364.00 
300.00 
330.21 
115.95 



value 81,200.00 

1,176.05 

1,500.00 

539.00 

200.00 



TOOLS AND FURNITURE. 

Special Patterns . 
Tools and Machinery . 
Stable Department 
Office Furniture . 
Pumping Station Furniture 

In closing, the Superintendent takes this opportunity to thank the 
members of the Water Board for their support and co-operation in the 
work of the department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NATHANIEL DENNETT, 

Super in ten den t. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER OF THE PUMPING 

STATION. 



High Service Puimping Station, 
SoMERViLLE, Dec. 31, 1894. 



To THE SOMERVILLE MySTIC WaTER BoARD : 

Gentlemen^ — The fifth annual report of the work performed by the 
High Service pump is as follows : — 



Number of days on which the pump was run 
Number of runs made .... 
Total pumping time, in hours 
Average pumping lime per day, in hours 
Average number of revolutions per minute 
Number of tons of coal consumed . 
Total gallons of water pumped 
Average steam pressure 
Average back water pressure . 



365 

732 

2,129 

27 8 

^ ' 100 

282 

170,496,000 

40 lbs. 

36 lbs. 



There have been no breaks or accidents during the year, and the 
boilers and machinery are in good condition. 

Respectfully submitted. 



SIDNEY E. HAYDEN, Engineer. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, February 13, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, February 13, 1894. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHAS. S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the Board of Health, ) 
City Hall, January 1, 1805. / 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Cut Council : — 

Gentle??ien, — We respectfully submit the following as the seven- 
teenth annual report of the Board of Health, in which is presented 
a statement, tabulated and otherwise, of the sanitary condition of 
the city and the business of the Board for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1894. 

ORGANIZATION. 

Chairman, Dr. Thomas M. Durell. 
Clerk, William P. Mitchell. 
Agent, Caleb A. Page. 

NUISANCES. 

A record of nuisances abated during the year, in compliance 
with notices issued by the Board, or under the Board's direction, is 
presented in the following table, under the head of months when 
the complaints were made : — 



384 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



NUISANCES ABATED IN THE YEAR 1894. 





cs 
:3 

1— > 

7 
8 
2 

8 

5 
3 
6 

"6 
o 

i 

2 

1 

2 

1 

5 

2 

3 

2 

6 

16 

26 

38 

2 

1 

2 

4 
1 
1 

2 
5 
4 
6 
5 
6 

4 

5 

5 

• 1 


2 

1 

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1 

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3 

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1 

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3 

2 

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4 

2 

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2 

2 
1 

5 

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3 
5 

12 

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1 

2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 

'i 
1 

1 


< 

*i 
1 

'i 
1 

2 

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2 

2 
i 

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3 
2 

10 

14 
2 

i 

2 
3 

'3 


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4 

5 

1 

1 

'5 
1 

2 

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17 

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1 

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1 
1 

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1 

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2 
3 
1 

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'3 

2 


1—) 

2 
'2 
2 

"5 
1 
2 

3 
1 

1 
1 
4 

1 

2 
2 

5 
1 

'2 

1 
4 

46 

2 

1 
2 

3 

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1 
3 
2 
3 

2 
6 

1 
4 

1 
1 


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M 

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6 

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1 

1 
1 

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1 

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1 

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1 
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1 

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2 

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2 

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6 

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1 

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p 

2 

1 
1 

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1 
1 
2 

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1 
1 
1 

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2 

'2 

4 

i 

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1 
1 

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1 




H 


Cellar damp . 
Cesspool offensive . 
Cesspool overflowing 
Connections of drainage 

fective .... 
Cow barn offensive 
Decomposed meat offens 
Drainage defective 
Drainage emptying into 
Drainage emptying on si 
Drainage not ventilated 
Drain-pipe defective 
Hennery offensive . 
Hens kept in cellar 
Horse shed offensive 
Manure exposed and offe 
Manure-pit defective 
Manure-pit too close to ' 
Offal on land . 
Offensive odor in and ab 

ings . . _. _ 
Opening in drain-pipe in 
Pigs kept without license 
Premises filthy 
Premises untidy 
Privy-vault defective 
Privy-vault full 
Privy-vault offensive 
Rubbish in cellar . 
Rubbish under stable 
Sewage flowing under flc 
Sewer-gas in house 
Slops thrown on surface 
Stable infected with glan 
Stable infected with tube 
Stable and stable prem 

and offensive 
Stable without drainage 
Stagnant water on surfa 
Waste-pipe defective 
Waste-pipe not trapped 
Water-closet defective 
Water - closet insufificie 

plied with water . 
Water-closet offensive 
Water in cellar 
Water under stable 


pipe 

ive . 

cella 
jrfac 

;nsiv( 

louse 

out c 

cells 

)or 

ders 

rculc 

ises 

:;e 
ntly 


;s de 

r 

well 

r 

)sis 
lilthj 

sup 




i 


1 

1 

2 
3 
1 

2 

i 

3 

1 
3 

*i 

20 
1 

"i 

1 
1 

'i 

2 
3 

2 

1 
2 




2 

i 

1 

i 
i 

i 
2 

i 
i 

2 
1 


19 
10 
12 

21 

2 

1 

31 
15 
25 

2 

17 

10 

5 

1 
25 
10 

8 
8 

16 
19 

6 
10 
34 
27 
64 
173 

9 

3 

12 
15 

3 
IS 

1 

12 
17 
15 
17 
17 
25 

6 
17 
17 

3 


Total 


201 


28 


65 


56 


74 


60 


121 


54 


47 


15 


22 


33 


778 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 385 



Number of nuisances abated ..... 

Number of nuisancer referred to Board of 1895 
Number of nuisances complained of . . . 

Number of complaints (many covering more than one 
nuisance) ....... 

Number of notices mailed ..... 

Number of notices served by constables . 



778 
221 
999 

462 

451 

1 



In addition to the above, many nuisances have been abated on 
verbal notice from the Agent, without action by the Board, and of 
which no record has been made. 

Glanders. — Eighteen cases of glanders and one case of tubercu- 
losis have occurred during the year. Prompt action was taken in 
every case, and the horses have been killed. We renew our request 
of previous years, that owners of horses notify the Board or its Agent, 
at once, on the appearance of this disease. We renew our request 
sent to the Committee on Highways last year, that the committee use 
great care to have the watering troughs cleaned out occasionally, in 
order to prevent the spread of this disease. 



PERMITS. 

The record of permits to keep cows, swine, and goats, to collect 
grease, and to remove manure, is as follows : — 

Cows. — One application was received for permit to keep three 
cows. No fees are required for these permits. 

Swine. — Twenty-six applications were received for permits to 
keep one hundred and ninety-four swine. Twenty-four permits were 
granted to keep one hundred and eighty-seven swine, and two per- 
mits were refused. The fee is one dollar for each swine. 

Goats. — Five applications were received for permits to keep 
five goats, all of which were granted. Fee for each goat, one 
dollar. 
(24) 



386 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Grease. — Four applications were received for permits to collect 
grease, all of which were granted. The fee is two dollars. Two of 
the parties licensed reside in Somerville, one in Charlestown, and one 
in Chelsea. 

Manure. — Two permits were issued during the year for the 
carting of manure through the streets of the city in the day time, be- 
tween May 1 and November 1, and ten were issued for the removal 
of manure from the stables in the city m the day time, within the 
same period. No fee is charged for these permits. 



PEDLERS. 

One hundred and sixty certificates of registration were issued to 
hawkers and pedlers during the year, — an increase of forty-six over 
the year 1893. These certificates are issued under Ordinance num- 
ber thirty of the Revised Ordinances of 1891, and are good for an 
indefinite period. All pedlers are" required to present their vehicles 
for inspection by the agent of the Board at the Police Station, the 
first Monday of each month, so that he may see that they are kept in 
a clean condition and are properly marked with the owner's name 
and number. 

ASHES. 

The ashes and house-dirt were removed during the year by 
William J. McCarty, for the sum of fifty-seven hundred dollars. 
The collections are made weekly, as follows : 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



in district one. 
'' two. 
'' three. 
" four. 
'' five. 
" six. 



Materials for removal must be free from filth and offal, must be 
placed in barrels or boxes, and must be set on the outer edge of the 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 387 

sidewalk before eight o'clock in the morning of the day when the 
collection is to be made. 

The districts were estabHshed by the Board of Health of 1890 
and are bounded as follows : — 

District 1. — Beginning at the Boston line and bounded by the 
northeasterly line of Pearl street, the southerly line of Walnut street, 
the northeasterly line of Highland avenue, the easterly line of 
Medford street, the northerly line of Washington street, the north- 
westerly line of Prospect street, the northerly line of Concord 
avenue, extended across Beacon street to the Cambridge line, and 
by the Cambridge and Boston lines. 

District 2. — Beginning at the Boston line and bounded by 
the northeasterly line of Pearl street, the southeasterly line of 
Walnut street, the northeasterly line of Broadway, the northeasterly 
line of Main street, and by the Medford and Boston lines. 

District 3. — Beginning at the Medford line and bounded by 
the southeasterly line of Cedar street, the northeasterly line of High- 
land avenue, the southeasterly line of Walnut street, the north- 
easterly line of Broadway, the northeasterly line of Mam street and 
by the Medford line. 

District 4. — Beginning at the intersection of Medford and 
Washington streets, and bounded by the northerly line of Washing- 
ton street, the northwesterly line of Prospect street, the northeasterly 
line of Somerville avenue, the southeasterly line of School street, the 
northeasterly line of Summer street, the southeasterly line of Cedar 
street, the northeasterly line of Highland avenue, and the easterly 
line of Medford street to Washington street. 

District 5. — Beginning at the intersection of Prospect street 
and Somerville avenue, and bounded by the northwesterly line of 
Prospect street, the northerly line of Concord avenue prolonged to 
the Cambridge line, the Cambridge line (extending westwardly), 
the southeasterly lines of Oxford, Mossland, and Cedar streets, the 
northeasterly line of Summer street, the southeasterly line of School 
street, and the northeasterly line of Somerville avenue to Prospect 
street. 



o88 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

District 6. — All of that portion of the city lying west of the 
easterly lines of Cedar, Mossland, and Oxford streets. 

It will be seen by these descriptions that the side lines of streets 
are used as boundaries, and not the middle lines; so that ashes are 
removed from the sidewalks on both sides of a street on the same day. 

The city will abandon the contract system, January 1, 1895, 
and hereafter the ashes will be collected with the city's teams by men 
employed by the day or week, under a competent superintendent. 



HOUSE OFFAL. 

The two years contract for the collection of house offal expired 
June 26th, last, but the same contractor, Mr. Martin Gill, has per- 
formed the work up to the present time. The expense for the year 
was sixty-eight hundred and fifty-five dollars. The collection has 
been very unsatisfactory, and the city will begin on January 1, 1895, 
to collect the offal with its own men and teams, in the same manner 
as is stated above in relation to the collection of ashes. Seven 
wagons and three sleds were in service December 31, 1894. 



NIGHT SOIL. 

The removal of night soil has been made by R. M. Johnson of 
Arlington, during the past year, and has been carried on by the 
"Odorless" process. 

The contract price which the owner or occupant is charged is 
four dollars for every load, or part of a load, of eighty cubic feet. 
About three hundred loads have been removed during the year. An 
order-box for the removal is kept at the Police Station on Bow street. 
There has been quite a falling off in the number of loads collected 
during the year, as the old-fashioned vaults are fast giving way to 
water closets. 

DEATHS. 

There were eight hundred and seventy-three deaths and forty 
five still-births in the city during the year, as specified in the follow- 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



381) 



ing table, which shows an increase of deaths over the previous year of 
seventy-one. 



Deaths of children under one year of age 

" " " over one year and under five years 
'■ at McLean Asyhim during the year . 
'• " Somerville Hospital during the year 



" Home for Aged Poor 



186 

127 

18 

25 

36 



390 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

MORTALITY IN SOMERVILLE IN 1894. 





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H 


ZYMOTIC E 

Miasms 

Scarlet fever . 
Diphtheria 
Typhoid fever 
Erysipelas 
Phlebitis . 
Diarrhoea 
Cholera morbus 
Cholera infantum 
Septicaemia 
Whooping cough 
Dysentery 
Rheumatism . 
Croup 
Influenza 
La grippe 
Meningitis 

CONSTITUTION 

DiATHI 

Cancer . 
Tumor 

TuBERC 

Tuberculosis . 
Tubercular mening 
Phthisis . 

LOCAL DI 

Nervous 

Apoplexy 
Paralysis 
Insanity . 
Brain diseases 
Convulsions . 
Spinal disease 
Hemiplegia 
Epilepsy . 

Organs of C 

Heart disease . 
Aneurism 
Angina pectoris 
Cyanosis 

Respirator 

Pneumonia 
Bronchitis 
Hemorrhage . 
Pleurisy . 
Asthma . 
Laryngitis 
Pulmonary oedema 


USE 

^TIC. 

AL ] 

JTIC. 
JLAR 

itis 

SEA 

Syst 

IRCUI 

V Or 


A.SE 

DISI 

SES 

EM. 

.ATIO 
CANS 


3. 

:ase 

N. 


-S. 


1 

2 
2 

i 

1 
1 

i 

2 

1 
2 

i 

•2 
1 

*i 

8 

1 
2 

1 
1 

"i 

7 
1 
1 

10 
3 
1 


3 
3 

2 

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1 

2 

i 

2 

3 

2 

10 

1 

"i 

5 

9 

1 


7 
4 

2 

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2 

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5 

1 

1 

3 

1 
10 

3 
1 

6 

10 
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3 

1 

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2 

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i 

1 

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2 

9 
4 

"i 


7 
8 
2 

4 

2 

1 

1 

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1 

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1 

3 

1 

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11 

2 

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2 

i 

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2 
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1 
1 

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1 

2 

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4 

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4 

1 
1 

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2 
2 

18 

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1 

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1 

1 

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5 

3 

5 
1 

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1 


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4 
1 

6 
1 

10 

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1 

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1 
4 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

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1 

5 

1 

i 

4 
1 
1 

i 


1 
2 

4 

'4 

i 
2 

2 

1 

1 
4 

1 
1 

2 

i 
1 

5 

1 
1 

4 
1 

i 

i 


3 
4 

*i 

1 

"i 

1 

2 

2 

1 
5 

3 
3 
1 
2 
2 
1 

8 

"i 
2 

\ 


7 
5 
2 

"i 

1 
1 

'2 

2 

3 

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3 
2 

i 
1 

3 

i 

6 
1 
1 

i 
2 


2 
1 
2 

i 

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i 

'3 

3 
1 

2 
1 

10 

2 
i 
i 

7 
1 
1 
1 

5 
5 

*i 

*i 

1 


51 

28 

13 

5 

4 

15 

3 

34 

5 

13 

4 

3 

3 

4 
30 

22 

'4 

IS 

6 

89 

15 
12 

14 

12 

4 

4 

4 

56 
5 
4 
5 

79 

24 

6 

1 

.> 

4 

S 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 391 

MORTALITY IX SOMERVILLE IN \^'.)i. — ContiJiued. 



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LOCAL D] 

Digestive 
Gastritis . 

Peritonitis 
Hepatitis 
Liver disease . 
Gastric ulcer . 
Enteritis . 
Hsematemesis . 
Intestinal catarrh 
Hernia . 
Jaundice 
Appendicitis . 
Cirrhosis 

Genito-Urina 
Bnght's disease 
Diabetes 
Cystitis . 
Nephritis 
Childbirth 
Eclampsia 

Integumenta 

Pemphigus 
Eczema . 

DEVELOPMENT 

Of Chu 
Inanition 

Premature birth a 
debility 

Of Old I 
Old age . 

VIOLENT 

Railroad . 
Suicide . 

Arsenical poisoning 
Asphyxia 
Sunstroke 
Accidental drownin 
Burning . 
Alcoholism 
Fracture of skull . 
Concussion ol brain 
Fracture of ribs 
Fracture of thigh 
Surgical operation 


SEA 
Org 

RY C 
RY S 

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3 


SES 

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M. 

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snita 


S. 


1 
2 

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3 

1 
4 

3 

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i 
1 

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1 

1 
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1 

2 
2 

10 

68 
5 


i 

*i 

1 

2 
1 

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1 

4 

i 
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78 
3 


1 

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1 

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1 

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1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

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58 

1 


1 
1 

1 
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1 

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1 

3 

*i 
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76 
4 


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i 

2 

i 
1 

2 

*i 
i 

i 

4 
2 

3 

i 
1 
1 

55 
2 


*i 
i 

2 

1 
1 

i 

5 

5 
2 

i 
i 

89 


• 
1 

i 

2 

i 

4 
3 

i 
1 

77 
5 


2 

i 
i 

3 
2 
1 
2 

4 
3 

4 

3 

68 

7 


2 
3 

i 
i 

2 
2 

i 

2 
2 

6 

i 

70 

7 


1 

i 

i 

1 

i 

2 

1 

4 

1 
1 

"i 

72 
5 


1 

i 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 

i 
1 
1 

i 
1 

4 
4 

1 

2 

i 

i 

i 

80 

1 


6 
8 
2 
3 
4 
14 
3 
6 
3 
1 
5 
6 

17 
9 
6 

7 

9 

3 

1 
2 

27 
28 

51 

4 
5 

1 
3 
1 
2 

7 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 


Total 

Stillborn 


82 
5 


873 
45 



Population (estimated) 
Death rate per thousand 



52,600 
16.6 



392 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



DISEASES DANGEROUS TO THE PUBLIC HEALTH. 

This Board has adjudged small pox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, 
typhus fever, and typhoid fever to be contagious and dangerous to 
the public health, within the meaning of the statutes. Physi- 
cians are required to report immediately to the Board, every case of 
either of these diseases coming under their care, and postal cards 
conveniently printed and addressed, are supplied to them for the 
purpose. 

Scarlet Fever. — Four hundred and fifty-two cases of scarlet 
fever have been reported during the year, fifty-one of which resulted 
fatally. In 1893 there were three hundred and fourteen cases, nine 
teen of which resulted fatally. 

Diphtheria. — One hundred and ten cases of diphtheria have been 
reported during the year, twenty-eight of which were fatal. In 1893 
there were fifty-six cases, eleven of which proved fatal. Warning 
cards are used in dealing with these two diseases, and the premises 
are fumigated immediately after the termination of a case. An in- 
spection is made by the agent of the Board, of the premises where 
diphtheria is reported, and all sanitary defects discovered are 
required to be remedied as soon as possible. 

Typhus Fever. — This disease has not appeared in our city 
during the past year. 

Typhoid Fever. — Fifty-eight cases of typhoid fever have been 
reported during the year, thirteen of which have proved fatal. In 
1893 there were fifty-nine cases reported, thirteen of which were f^tal. 

Small Pox. — The city has been free from this disease during 
the year, but bills were paid to the amount of eleven hundred and 
eighty and -^^ dollars, for the case mentioned in our report of 1893. 
The patient finally recovered and left the city. In January, four 
physicians were employed by this Board, one from each ward, to 
vaccinate all persons who applied for vaccination. Six hundred and 
twenty dollars was paid the physicians, and the Board is of the 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



393 



opinion that it may have been the means of stopping the spread of 
this dreaded disease. 

Tables. — The prevalence of scarlet fever, diphtheria, and typhoid 
fever in the city during the several months of the year 1894 is shown 
by the following table, and in the table next following is given the 
number of deaths from these three diseases, by months, during the 
last ten years : — 



SCARLET FEVER, DIPHTHERIA, AND TYPHOID FEVER 
REPORTED IN 1894. 





Scarlet Fever. 


Diphtheria. 


Typhoid Fever. 






^ 


v . 




^ 


1 




<>i 


« . 




T3 


o 


to yi 


tJ 


o 


bfi M , 


"O 


o 


tA .A 


Months. 


« 5 




C « 

„ (U 




Number 
Deaths 


enta 
eath 


ce o 


b (A 

•a « 


C « 








CU o 


og- 


333 


Og" 




04 O 


January . 


52 


7 


13.4 


6 


2 


5 


2 


40. 


February 


28 


3 


10.7 


7 


3 


42.8 


1 


— 




March . 


63 


7 


11.1 


7 


4 


57.1 


1 







April 


33 


3 


9. 


3 


1 


33.3 


5 


— 




May 


63 


7 


11.1 


7 


3 


42.8 


6 


2 


33.3 


June 


51 


4 


7.8 


3 


— 




3 


1 


33.3 


July . . 


26 


4 


7.7 


9 


1 


11.1 


— 


1 




August . 


27 


3 


11.1 


6 


4 


66.6 


1 9 


1 


11.1 


September 


16 


1 


6.2 


9 


— 




1 6 


9 


33.3 


October . 


31 


3 


9.7 


13 


4 


30.8 


, 9 


— 




November 


34 


< 


20.6 


. 20 


o 


25. 


! 9 


2 


22.2 


December 


28 


2 


7.1 


20 


1 


5. 


4 


2 


50. 


Total . 


452 


51 


11.3 1 


110 


28 


25.5 


58 


13 


22.4 



394 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



DEATHS FROM SCARLET FEVER, DIPHTHERIA, AND TYPHOID 
FEVER IN THE LAST TEN YEARS. 







Scarlet Fever. 


Diphtheria. 


Typhoid Fever. 


Months. 


in 

00 
00 

1— 1 


to 

XI 
00 
rH 


l-H 


00 

00 
00 
1—1 


C2 
00 
00 

1—1 


i 

I— 1 


1—1 

S5 
00 

1—1 


OS 
00 

1—1 


CO 
00 

1— 1 

1 

• 

2 

9 

7 

19 


S5 
00 

1—1 

7 
3 
7 
3 
7 
4 
4 
3 
1 
3 
7 
2 

51 


00 

s 

2 

2 
1 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 

3 

1 
5 
4 

28 


00 

1 

2 

i 

4 

2 

1 

2 
2 
2 
3 

20 


00 
00 
1—1 

2 
1 

i 
i 

3 

1 

2 
11 


00 
00 
00 

rH 

1 

3 

3 
1 
1 
2 

i 

4 
4 

1 

21 


35 
00 
00 
1—1 

1 

4 
2 
6 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 

1 

5 

28 


o 

SI 
00 

1—1 

2 
2 
2 
1 
1 

4 
1 

3 
3 
2 

21 


1—1 

S5 
00 
rH 

2 

i 

1 

i 

3 
3 
4 
3 

18 


Ol 
00 

1— 1 

2 

2 
2 
1 

i 

8 


52 

00 

T-l 

2 
1 

2 
2 

i 

1 

2 

11 


35 
00 
r-^ 

2 
3 
4 

1 

3 

i 

4 

4 
5 
1 

28 


00 
00 
r-< 

2 
1 

i 

i 
1 

3 

1 
1 

11 


QO 
00 
1—1 

2 
1 

3 


00 
00 

I— ( 
2 

2 
11 


00 
00 
00 

3 

2 

4 
3 
3 
2 

17 


35* 

i 
i 

2 
2 

1 

7 


o 

35 
00 

i 

2 

1 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

10 


1— I 

00 

1— 1 

1 

i 

2 

2 
2 
3 

11 


35 
00 

2 

i 

1 

4 
3 

11 


CO 

05 

00 

i 

3 
2 

3 
2 
2 

13 


00 


January 
February 
March , 
April . 
May . 
June . 

July . 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 




2 
1 
1 
5 

i 

i 

2 
1 

14 


i 

2 
3 


1 

i 

i 

1 

6 
11 
10 

31 


5 
3 
4 
1 
1 
1 

15 


i 

1 

i 

1 

i 

2 

7 


2 
1 

i 

i 

5 


i 

1 

2 


3 

2 
4 

i 
i 

3 

14 


o 

2 

1 
1 
1 
2 

2 
2 


Total 


13 



DISTRICTS. 



The accompanying map shows the boundaries of the ten health 
districts into which the city was divided by the Board of Health of 
1878 ; also the locations of common sewers. 

A record has been kept from year to year of the number of 
deaths, the death rate per thousand, the prevalence of dangerous 
diseases and the number of nuisances abated in these several 
districts, and is continued in the following tables. 

The estimated population in the several districts was originally 
based on the number of assessed polls in each, and upon the 
population of the entire city ; the ratio of polls to population being 
presumed to be the same in all the districts. Substantially the same 
method of estimating the population has been continued, the census 
of every fifth year being taken as a basis for calculation. 

We have obtained the number of dwellings and of assessed polls, 
May 1, 1894, from the assessors' books, by actual count, instead of 
assuming as has been done in former years, that their increase was 
uniform throughout the city. 



^ 



MAP OF 



■ ^OMERVILLE • 




SEWERS SHOWN -THUS — 



cm 

1 D 



i'LIOTYTI ramnnG C. BO-'TtU 



394 




DEAT 



Month 



January 
February 
March , 
April . 
May . 
June . 
July . 
August 
Septembe 
October 
Novembe 
Decembe 



Total 



( 



// 



T 

distric 
1878: 

death 
diseas 
distri( 



S 



based 
popu] 
presu 
meth 
of ev 
W( 
May 
assur 
unifo 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



395 



oorq 

n #-► 
a a* 



v. CC ^ X GO 

X -A y. rcaa 

•J X -I — 



In 1894. 



> 


o 


'V 


1- 




o 










Orq 


5' 


<«5- 






n 






• 8> 


• 


• 


r> 






. 3" 







r 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
per 1,000. 







=5 


CO 






^. 






1—1 




00 


~ 


> 








Number of 
Deaths. 






Rate 
per 1,000. 



cc 


M 


cc 


107 A. 


I— 1 



to 05 CO w -J -J a; ;^ -1 ;o 

I— 1 1—1 

p— i:S'-4Ot£'X0;00CJ«~5 

-4*»oscis*'C7'K»p->:stc 

lii— itaJtc^j^i— II— 'I— itc 

Gcx>«^h3cc3^'y:'»--i 

CO o •*' o tr i;i -I -1 CT oc- 

i-itOi-'l-ii-il— i-^i-ii-*i-i 

oooo5c;>oo>«^occ»sit».*^ 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
par 1,000. 



Number of i 
Deaths. ' 



Rate 
per 1 ,000. 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
per 1,000. 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
per 1.000. 



Number of 
Deaths. 



O>^t0-J*'SiC»5--JCC--l 



Rate 
per 1,000. 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
per 1,000. 



Number of 
Deaths. 



0^^>^b5bS*»->f^> 



Rate 
per 1,000. 



Number of 
Deaths. 



Rate 
per 1,000. 



3^rJS':5Sg32:^— Number of 

3ioS — cito-^2;:^^ Deaths. 



OCnCiCX/CiC^iCiOOC^OO 



Rate 
per 1,000. 





>—i 


o 


ca 




QO 


*» 




1—1 


00 


oc 


> 







to 


GO 




if^ 


>£^ 


K> 


be 


1—1 


K- 


> 







-.. 






C5 
00 


^ 


1^- 

> 

1 

1 



X 



X 









t9 






00 




C5 


9.P 


en 


~a 


".^ 


o 


n 


^ 


H^ 


o 
o 


> 



m 





H 




> 


d 


O 


R 




> 




H 


n 


X 
en 


CA! 






t— 1 


?« 


23 


1— • 




o 


H 


H 




c 


^ 


l-H 


o 

r 


2; 


f> 


H 


:^5 


X 


> 


R 


CO 


i-H 


^ 




C 


CA! 

H 


1^ 






H 




W 


1 


:z: 




*< 




m 




> 




7^ 




in 




R 




X 




n 




r 




c 




Ol 




t— 1 




< 




W 



o 



39 G 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE SHOWING THE FIVE PRINCIPAL CAUSES OF DEATH IN 
. SOMERVILLE IN 1894, WITH THE NUMBER AND RATE 

IN EACH DISTRICT. 





Consump- 


Pneui 




Heart 


Scarlet 








tion. 


HONIA. 


Disease. 


Fever. 


Old 


Age. 










u • 
















1^.. 


V Cu 


*-*? 


V a, 


"^ 


V o> 


*-»-i 


u c 


-*-• 


S d 






a o 




ao 




p, o 




a o 




D. O 


Districts. 


^_fi 


V, P- 


t;£ 


^ o- 


s^ 


^ o. 


s^ 


u o- 


u -C 


i. ^ 




-3 « 


^ o 


■^^ 


-Q O 


-§ « 




-§ « 




■e rt 


1) I*, 

.^ o 






So 


Si; 


§8- 




go 


Si; 


^§ 


5q 


5o 




^ 


^::t 


'iz, 


^^^ 


^ 


^^^ 


^ 


^::^ 


iz; 


z!:- 


I 


18 


2.59 


15 


2.16 


9 


1.29 


19 


2 73 


9 


1.29 


II 


8 


1.48 


7 


1.30 


5 


0.92 






3 


0.55 


Ill 


11 


2.44 


9 


1.99 


3 


0.66 


9 


1.99 


2 


0.44 


IV 


11 


2.05 


10 


1.86 


6 


1.12 


12 


2.24 


.0 


0.93 


V 


17 


1.63 


14 


1.34 


19 


1,82 


4 


0.38 


18 


172 


VI 


7 


1.32 


5 


0.94 


2 


0.37 


4 


0.75 


o 


0.94 


VII. 


8 


1.25 


7 


1.09 


5 


0.78 


1 


0.15 


4 


0.62 


VIII 


<> 


82 


2 


0.82 


4 


1.65 


1 


0.41 


2 


0.82 


IX 


3 


0.82 


4 


1.10 


1 


0.27 


1 


0.27 


2 


0.55 


X 


4 


1.73 


6 


2.59 


2 


0.55 


•• 




i 


0.43 


Total 


89 


1.69 


79 


1.50 


56 


1.06 


51 


0.96 


51 


0.96 



TABLE OF SCARLET FEVER, DIPHTHERIA, AND TYPHOID FEVER 
IN EACH DISTRICT IN 1894. 





Scarlet Fever. 


Diphtheria. 


Typhoid Fev 


SR. 








u ci- 


o ^ 






t, cl 


n^ ^ 






I- ft 


J: ^ 


Districts. 




u5 
Q 


i; o 

ex &( 


CSO 
4) O 


U 1, 


03 

Q 


1) o 

aft 

J§R 


ft a 

•5 ° 
«o 
V o 




tA 

« 

Q 


« g 

CL ft 


^a 

■5 ° 

rtO 
«o 




P< 




I— 1 


I— 1 


p^. 




'-'R, 


0^- 


p^; 




Oo_ 


!-H 


I 


97 


19 


13.98 


2.73 


10 


4 


1.44 


57 


8 


1 


1.15 


0.14 


II 


24 




4.45 




7 


1 


130 


0.18 


4 


1 


0.74, 


0.18 


Ill 


54 


9 


11.98 


1.99 


20 


6 


4.44 


1.33 


6 




1.33 




IV 


77 


12 


14.37 


2.24 


20 


8 


3.73 


1.49 


4 


1 


0.74 


o.is 


V. .... . 


60 


4 


5.75 


0.38 


26 


7 


2.49 


0.67 


14 


4 


1.34 


0.38 


VI 


52 


4 


9 85 


0.75 


5 




0.94 







1 


0.94 


0.18 


VII 


30 


1 


4.69 


0.15 










4 


2 


0.62 


0.31 


VIII 


20 


1 


8.29 


0.41 


11 


2 


4.56 


0.82 


2 


i 


0.82 


0.41 


IX 


23 


1 


6.35 


0.27 


5 


, , 


1.38 




< 


2 


1.92 


0.55 


X 


15 




6.49 


• 


6 




2.59 




4 




1.73 




Total .... 


452 


51 


8.59 


0.96 


110 


28 


2.09 


53 


58 


13 


1.10 


0.24 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



397 



Q 


.^ 


p 


< 


< 


<; 


<^ 


.-' 


r 


r 


• 


Districts. 




RATES PER ' 


\ Cases . . . 
\ Deaths . . 




'/4 




CO 


Op 


oo 


Op 


CO 

13 C/1 
— (A 


13 C/> 


— 1/1 

a. 


f 


O 
C 

> 

r-l 




4> 


P— '-I 

in Oi 
O 1—1 




Op< 


1% 


O IC 

bb 

in4- 




OO 

o — 


^•^1 


2 il 


Scarlet Fever. 


3, 


G 

o r 


' ks 


r- Iw 


Li O 




ii -^ 


o -x 


O Iw 
jf x 


*-ii 


O 1 i 


^ )£^ 


-- tw 

b*- 

-1 4- 


Diphtheria. 




kk 


o o 


Oi*' 

(X lo 


• b 
■-I 


' 05 


Pr" 


O I— ' 


I— ' lo 

H- JC 


p p 

b-1 
^x 


OlO 

*- 10 


Typhoid Fever. 








ti> 


: : 






• b 




OH- 

bfco 

00*- 


Pr" 

b j^ 


• OS 

Iw 


04^ 


Scarlet Fever. 


00 1 
00 . 

o 


-lis 


*-x 


4- 


25^ 


O >»- 

bb 
x<x 


o 
• b 


o*- 
*^x 


Oli- 

b b 

Wlw 


: ^ 


o lo 
ft ^ 


kk 


Diphtheria. 






in 


: : 


• *> 


Iw 

OS 


oo 

W 5i 


op 
iwb 


*- 


o — 
t*b 


o OS 

lO.— 


Typhoid Fever. 


5 > 




! O M 
1 S Crt 




4^ 


■ 7^' 


OS 




X 


oci 
icb 


ow 




o 
to 


OS 


Scarlet Fever. 


9 

i 




o o 


Ot-0 


• b 


-1 


Or*- 


O li 

I'i' C>i 
o *- 


b b 


o OS 

-1 ^ 

OS X, 


ois> 

i-b 

lO -J 


Oh- 

b b 


Diphtheria. 


PC '' 




• o 


• ^ 


o^^ 

'XCi 


i^^. 


— Ii< 

H- ii 


lO t2 


: b 


th 


xS 


H-X 

4- to 


Typhoid Fever. 








O to 


• ^J 






• OG 


Iw 


• b 


o oi 


p X 

bin 


' t;J 


lO 


Scarlet Fever. 


00 

- 


o — 
1-;. i-v 


oo 
-I -I 


O li 
lo *- 


o w 


• ^i 


o o 

yi yi 

O O 


• tc 

IC 


p ^ 

tC w* 


b i- 
lO 4^ 


cr, i- 


^^ 


Diphtheria. 


^i 




: : 




• in 


O t* 


O l^i 
CJi X 

O H- 


O p 


O — 


Oli 

o w 


OS I—" 
u;x 


• -1 
-1 


Typhoid Fever. 










Oi 


-I 


o 


l-C •-- 


-1 


O-l 

b-J 

4-X 


is 


o^ 

&4 X 


b-i 

-1 i;< 


9r- 

M 4- 


Scarlet Fever. 


00 

o 


r D 

1 H-: S 


oo 


o 


o 

• - 1 
ex 


• -1 




li 
x 


O — 

^b 


p p 

— ' X 
X o 


tc X 


P - 

l*0 4; 


^X 

iw OS 


Diphtheria. 


' ^^ 






— o 


o *- 
u. cr. 


i ' X 


• j^ 


i::-?, 


• s 


lO ^> 


Typhoid Fever, 


K i: 
Z > 








iil 


o c 


o *- 


O Iw 


— i- 


x^ 


^x 


4- 


b X 


Scarlet Fever. 


00 I 


-1 


ic 1— > 

t-w l>0 


r— IC 


• -1 


S; 


o — 


o — 


|i: 


• b 


io^ 


lO O 


isb 


Diphtheria. 


Oh- 




• -1 


ClO 


HJ^_3 


• t* 


b-i 


-1 5^ 


. c^ 


*-b 


^k 


Typhoid Fever. 


i < 






















o 


OiX 
Gi O 


* !f^ 


oo 

-J in 


ooo 


H-b 


o p 

in in 


Owl 
X in 


i>s *.- 

IC iC 


t^T" 


4- 
• *.. 


to OS 

OS X 


Scarlet Fever. 


00 


O l-i 

JJi o 




^ 


o *- 




■ b 


O Li 


fr rJ 


sis: 


X O 


3^ 


Diphtheria. 


< 


1* >^ 

! ^-o 




in is 
in i>i 


o o 

H- t>0 


o o 
bb 


x*^ 


O — 

Cw iC 
X ip' 




• OS 

OS 




>^ w> 


Typhoid Fever. 


?3 






5.4(5 
0.33 


h; O 


o ^^ 


o *>- 

iC in 


o *- 


^-^ in 
;2 *- 


O wl 


o *- 

b b 
—1 *- 


O-l 


O OS 


o c; 
b b 

in X 


Scarlet Fever. 


3 a 




1 ;f^2 




0!<, 


o u. 


o — 
1* o 


CC -1 


O li 


O Iw 

-lb 
X ts 


O Iw 


wt^ 


b-1 

OS— 1 


Diphtheria. 


O 


1 -Thf^ 


o'x 


gjS 


Oh- 




O Iw 

oJ X 


bb 

•wl o 


OO 
ii X 


ii 


lO X 

-I OS 


o — 


Typhoid Fever. 





398 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



NUISANCES ABATED IN EACH DISTRICT IN 1894. 



Population (estimated) . 



Cellar damp 

Cesspool offensive .... 

Cesspool overflowing . . . 

Connections of drainage pipes 
defective 

Cow-barn offensive 

Decomposed meat offensive 

Drainage defective .... 

Drainage emptying into cellar 

Drainage emptying on surface 

Drainage not ventilated . . 

Drain-pipe defective . . . 

Hennery offensive .... 

Hens kept in cellar . . . 

Horse-shed offensive . . . 

Manure exposed and offensive 

Manure-pit defective . . . 

Manure-pit too close to house 

Offal on land 

Offensive odor in and about 
dwellings 

Opening in drain-pipe in cellar 

Pigs kept without license 

Premises filthy 

Premises untidy .... 

Privy-vault defective . . . 

Privy-vault full 

Privy-vault offensive . . 

Rubbish in cellar .... 

Rubbish under stable . . . 

Sewage flowing under floor . 

Sewer Gas in house . . . 

Slops thrown on surface . . 

Stable infected with glanders 

Stable infected with tuber- 
culosis 

Stable and stable premises 
filthy and offensive . . 

Stable without drainage . 

Stagnant water on surface 

Waste-pipe defective . . 

Waste-pipe not trapped . 

Water-closet defective 

Water-closet insufficiently 
supplied with water 

Water-closet offensive 

Water in cellar . . . 

Water under stable . . 



Total 



I. 
6,936 



12 
3 
.5 





2 

2 

io 

4 



8 

9 

3 

4 

13 

3 

25 

96 

5 

1 

6 

6 



299 



II 
5,382 



III. 

4,504 



3 
1 
3 

10 
4 

10 
5 



83 



IV. 
5,35: 



11 
4 
I 

13 



110 



V, 
10,418 





8 
IS 
1 
1 
g 



VI. 

5,278 





4 
12 



47 



VII 
6,389 



2 

1 

10 



40 



IX. 

> 

2,410 3,61"; 



31 



X. 

2,309 



32 



Total. 
52,600 



19 
10 
12 

21 

2 

1 

31 

15 

25 

2 

17 

10 

5 

1 

25 

10 

8 

8 

16 
19 

6 
10 
34 
27 
64 
173 

9 

3 
12 
15 

3 
18 



12 
17 
15 
17 
17 
25 

6 
17 
17 

3 



32 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



399 



APPROPRIATION FOR HEALTH DEPARTMENT AND 
EXPENDITURES THEREFROM, 1894. 



Credit. 



Appropriation ..... 


$12,000 00 




Receipts : 






For Permits to keep swine and goats 






and to collect grease . 


200 00 




rent of land on Melrose street 


200 00 




rebate, contagious disease 


62 69 




Sundry bills not called for 


12 50 




Total credit 




S12,475 19 


Debit. 






Expenditures : 






For Agent's salary .... 


81,200 00 




Collecting ashes 


5,700 00 




Collecting offal .... 


6,855 -00 




Burying dead animals 


135 50 




Vaccine virus .... 


273 26 




Oil of peppermint 


13 68 




Wagons and sleds 


134 95 




Care of small-pox case 






(Henry Liscomb) 


1,180 12 




House for contagious diseases 


1,071 24 




Books, stationery, printing, etc. . 


123 88 




Incidentals .... 


1,230 10 




Total debit 




817,917 73 



Amount overdrawn . 



S5,442 54 



THOMAS M. DURELL, Chairman. 
ALVANO T. NICKERSON. 
ALVAH B. DEARBORN. 

Board of Health. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



(25) 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermkn, February 13, 1805. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINXENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, February 13, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



BOARD OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR, 1894. 



Hon. William H. Hodgkins, Chairman, ex officio. 

Nathan H. Reed, President, term expired May, '94 Ward One. 

Herbert E. Merrill, term began May, '94 . Ward One. 

Edward B. West, President ..... Ward Two. 

James G. Hinckley ...... Ward Three. 

Albert W. Edmands ...... Ward Four. 



COMMITTEES. 



On Investigation and Relief. — Mr. Reed, Mr. West, and Mr. Merrill. 
On Finance. — Mr. Hinckley and Mr. Edmands. 

Charles C. Folsom, General Agent. 

Cora F. Lewis, Secretary., 

Alvah B. Dearborn, M. D., City Physician. 
Office : Police Building, Bow St. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



To JHE Honorable, the Mayor and the City Council of the 
City of Somerville : — 

Gentlej?ie/i, — I'he ninth annual report of the OYerseers of the 
Poor, since its reorganization, is herewith submitted. The tables 
will give a slight glance at the details of the work. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Nathan H. Reed, who had served on the Board since 1890, de- 
clined a re-election, having been elected Principal Assessor from 
Ward One. He was President of the Board during the year 1893, 
and performed the duties of his office in a very impartial and satis- 
factory manner, giving much of his time to uplift and benefit the 
unfortunate. 

Ex-Councilman Herbert E. Merrill was elected in his place. 

James G. Hinckley was elected to the City Council in December, 
1894, and soon after resigned as Overseer of the Poor. Ex-Alder- 
man Ezra D. Souther was elected in his place. Mr. Hinckley took 
much interest in the work of the department and was always ready 
and willing to do everything possible for the relief of the destitute. 

Mr. Edward B. West of Ward Two was chosen President of the 
Board at the annual meeting in May^ and still holds that position. 

Mr. Charles C. Folsom, who has been General Agent for nearly 
ten years, is still the Almoner of the department. 

Miss Cora F. Lewis has now closed her second year as Secretary 
of the Board. 

Nearly every meeting during the year has been attended by al 
of the members, and all of their deliberations have been characterized 
by harmonious thought and action. 



406 ' ANNUAL REPORTS. 

WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

During January, February and March, 1894, many persons being 
idle, owing to the business depression, were compelled to ask for as- 
sistance. Some work was furnished by the City, which was appre- 
ciated by the most of those to whom it was offered. In the last 
months of the year 1894, the poor people were employed more than 
they were in the corresponding months of 1893, and consequently 
did not require so much aid from the City. We aided during the 
year 1,193 persons, an increase over 1893 of 299, divided into 269 
families, an increase of thirty-one. Sixty-three of the above persons 
were insane in hospitals and in private families, and thirty-six were 
sane persons we were fully supporting in out-of-town almshouses and 
private families. 

The Associated Charities have assisted us somewhat in our work, 
by aiding many families who would undoubtedly have applied to us. 
We have worked together very pleasantly, although not always think- 
ing alike in reference to all cases. 

We are not called upon to assist in the expense of as many burials 
as was the case some years ago, owing to the fact that it has become 
the custom among the poorer classes to have the lives of all the mem- 
bers of the family insured for a sum sufficient to pay the funeral bills. 

This may save us something in the line of funerals, but many per- 
sons use what little money they have to pay the assessments on insur- 
ance, and for expensive furniture bought upon the instalment plan, 
and then come to the City for something to eat. 

In the early part of the year, at the request of the Board, a hear- 
ing was granted by the Finance Committee of the City Council in 
reference to securing better accommodation for our full support pau- 
pers. 

All of the members availed themselves of the opportunity of being 
present. Facts were submitted showing that the time had come to 
secure land in a suitable location, and in our opinion, to make ar- 
rangements for the erection of an almshouse. No action was taken, 
however, except to refer the matter to a sub-committee, who did not 
find time to look the matter up and report, so far as we have been 
able to find out. This leaves us at the close of the year just where 
we were at the beginning. 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 407 

At the close of the year 1894, we were paying rent for fifteen 
families, averaging $5.93 each. 

We have assisted in the burial of thirteen persons, at an average 
cost of S11.38. 

We have given five permits for persons to enter the State Almshouse 
at Tewksbury. The Agent has visited persons in whom we were in- 
terested, in Maine, New Hampshire, and in most all parts of this State, 
in the interest of the City of Somerville. 

We can truly say that the year 1894 has been the busiest in the 
history of the department. 

As has been said so many times, if we could have an almshouse 
of our own it would simplify matters very much. 

The Appropriation for 1894 was $15,000. Total Expenditures, 

$19,733.13. Net Expenditures, $16,364.49. Collected from State, 

Si, 032. 09, from Cities and Towns, 81,901.44, from Individuals, 
$418.11. 

We sent bills to the City Treasurer for collection, amounting to 

$4,337.99, against $2,751.26 in 1893. 

The W^orking Committees of the Board in 1894 : — On Finance, 

Messrs Hinckley and Edmands. 

On Investigation and Relief, Messrs. Reed, West, and Merrill. 

For details see accompanying tables. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, Chairman, ex officio. 
NATHAN H. REED, President, Ward One. 
(Signed) HERBERT E. MERRILL, Ward One. 

EDWARD B. WEST, President, Ward Two. 
JAMES G. HINCKLEY, Ward Three. 
ALBERT W. EDMANDS, Ward Four. 

Board of Overseers of the Poor. 



408 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE No. I. 

PARTIAL SUPPORT. 

(^Out-door Relief.) 



Families aided . . 
Persons aided .... 
Burials ..... 
Permits to the Tewksburv Almshouse 



269 

1,193 

13 

5 



TABLE No. 2. 

FULL SUPPORT. 

{During the year.) 

In Almshouses ...... 

In private families ..... 

In hospitals . . . . 

In Massachusetts School for the Feeble-minded 
In House of the Angel Guardian 
Insane persons in private families 
Insane persons in hospitals 



16 

12 

21 

3 

1 

5 

63 



TABLE No. 3. 

FULL SUPPORT. 

( At present time, December 31, 1894.) 

In out-of-town almshouses . 

In private families ...... 

Insane in hospitals (we are reimbursed for 5) 
Insane in private families ..... 



10 

14 

51 

5 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



409 



TABLE No. 4. 
RECAPITULATIOiN . 



Appropriation 
Reimbursements 

» Total receipts 
Total expenditures 

Account overdrawn 
b Net expenditures 



$15,000.00 
3,368.64 



$18,368.64 
19,733.13 

$ 1,364.49 
3 6,364.49 



TABLE No. 5. 








REIMBURSEMENTS. 




Commonwealth of Massachusetts 


. 81,032.09 


City of Boston 






466.22 


" Cambridge .... 






265.49 


" Lowell 






6.00 


" Maiden 






13.60 


'' Medford 






61.05 


" Newton ..... 






469.89 


" Somerville (another department) 






41.00 


'' Waltham .... 






35.00 


" Woburn . . 






21.35 


Town of Brookline .... 






2.U0 


'' Canton .... 






15.41 


*^ Lexington .... 






146.00 


'^ No. Adams .... 






5.00 


" No. Andover .... 






162.09 


" Northampton .... 






24.65 


'^ Revere .... 






114.55 


" Stoneham .... 






52.14 


Guardians and Relatives 






418.11 


Money not called for .... 






17.00 




$3,368.64 



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REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January i6, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 16, 1895. 
Reference concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



I 



Office of the Cut Physician, ) 
January 1, 1895. ) 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the City Cou>xtl : — 

Gentlemen^ — I present the following as a summary of the work 
done by me as City Physician for the year ending December 31, 

1894: — 

Fifteen hundred and twenty-six visits have been made. 

Number of persons treated at my ofhce, three hundred eighty- 
seven. 

One hundred and forty persons have had teeth extracted. 

Seventy-four children have been vaccinated. 

Number of visits at the police station, thirty-two. 

Twenty-five women were attended in childbirth. 

Eighteen persons were examined for the police force, and twenty- 
one for permanent men in the fire department. 

Five visits were made and certificates given where persons had 
died unattended by a" physician. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALVAH B. DEARBORN, 

City Physician. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. Sent 
down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, in 
concurrence. 

CPIARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Ix CoMMiiTEES ON HIGHWAYS, January 1, 1895. 

To THE City Council : — 

Gentlemen, — The Committee on Highways presents the follow- 
ing report for the year ending December 31, 1894 : — 

HIGHWAYS ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 

Appropriation . 860,000.00 

Receipts and credits : 

For labor and materials furnished 
prior to January 1, 1894, the 
bills for which remained uncol- 
lected that day . . ' . 1,408.21 
Rent of dwelling at City Farm . SI 36.00 
Less water rates . . . 18.13 

117.87 



Health Department account, building at Gravel 

Bank 125.00 

Money approved in pay-roll not called for . 12.75 
Value of tools and personal property on hand January 

1,1894 * 11,839.70 

Value of materials on hand January 1, 1894 . . 480.00 

Total credit . . . . . S73,983.53 

(26) 



418 annual reports. 

Debit. 
Expenditures : 

For laying out Bartlett, Bigelow, 
Claremon, Cypress, Hancock, 
Knapp, Leon, Lowell, Munroe, 
Robinson, Trull, Wheeler, War- 
wick, Waldo streets, Cutter ave- 
nue. Fanning avenue and West- 
wood road (advertising notice 
of hearmgs) .... $173.00 

Construction of Streets : 

Billingham street, from William 

street to Broadway . . $260.40 

Claremon street, from Holland 

street to Mead street . . 399.40 

Essex street, from Medford street 

to Richdale avenue . . 52.85 

Greenville street, from Medford 

street to Munroe street . . 427.35 

Gorham street, from Holland street 

to Howard street . . . 197.80 

Hall avenue, from Elm street 

southeasterly 400 feet . . 510.70 

Heath street, from Bond street to 

Temple street . . . 168.60 

Hudson street, from Cedar street 

to Lowell street . . . 504.65 

Jenny Lind avenue, from Broad- 
way to Medford street . . 503.30 

Munroe street, from Walnut street 

easterly 350 feet . . . 241.70 

New Cross street, from Broadway 

to Mystic avenue . . . 811.20 

Porter street, from Highland ave- 
nue to Summer street . . 378.70 



Amoitnts carried forward . . $4,456.65 S173.00 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OX HIGHWAYS. 419 

Amounts brought forward . . $4,456.65 $173.00 
York Terrace, from Central street 

to Harvard place . . . 275.00 

$4,731.65 

Street crossings . . . .... 1,021.65 

Street signs erected . . .... 185.85 

Repairs and improvement of streets 
and paving of gutters in con- 
nection with setting of edge- 
stones : 

Billingham street, northwesterly 
side Broadway to William street, 
paving . . . . • . $225.95 

Beacon street, easterly side, Kent 

to Miller street, paving . . 303.90 

Broadway, southerly side. Rush to 

Cross street, paving . . 57.70 

Bond street, in front of the estate 

of Geo. G. Fox, paving . . 24.20 

Belmont street, in front of the 
estate of Joseph K. James, pav- 
ing 30.30 

Central street, northwesterly side, 
from Highland avenue to Rail- 
road, paving .... 134.20 
Repairs 448.60 

Cherry street, easterly side. High- 
land avenue to Summer street, 
paving ..... 140.00 

Dickinson street, easterly and 
southerly sides, Cambridge line 
to Springfield street, paving . 247.60 

Essex street, both sides, Medford 
street to Richdale avenue, pav- 
ina: 176.00 



Amounts carried forward . . $1,788.45 $6,112.15 



420 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amounts bivught forward . . ^1, 788.45 $6,112.15 

Elm street, in front of Nathan 

Tufts Park, paving . . . 474.20 

Repairs . .- . . . 145.05 

Elm street, southerly side, Rus- 
sell street to Davis square, pav- 
ing 52.80 

Fenwick street, around Langmaid 

terrace, paving . . . 19.05 

Fenwick street, in front of estate 

of Geo. G. Fox, paving . . 51.55 

Highland avenue, in front of Club 

House, paving . . . 36.20 

Hawthorn street, westerly side, 
Broadway to Arlington street, 
paving ..... 80.10 

Heath street, northerly side. Tem- 
ple to Bond street, paving . 454.20 

Heath street, in front of estate of 

Geo. G. Fox, paving . . 239.40 

Kingman court, westerly side, 
Washington street to within 50 
feet of end of court, paving . 35.85 

Lake street, southerly side, Haw- 
kins street to South Church 
street, paving . . . 271.50 

Medford street, in front of estate 
of New England Dressed Meat 
& Wool Co., paving . . 121.10 

Medford street, southwesterly side, 
Central to Bartlett street, pav- 
ing 212.30 

Munroe street, northwesterly side, 
from Walnut street to land of 
Jones, paving . . . 166.50 



Amounts carried forward . . ^4,148.25 $6,112.15 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 

Amoicnts brought forward . . §4,148.25 

Munroe street, southwesterly side, 

from Walnut street to southerly 

line estate of Mary W. Went- 

worth, paving . . . 104.95 

Porter street, both sides, High- 
land avenue to Summer street, 

paving ..... 610.20 

Richdale avenue, southwesterly 

side. School to Sycamore street, 

paving ..... 264.10 

Vernon street, in front of estate 

of B. Binney and others, paving 21.70 

Webster avenue, easterly side, 

Beach avenue to school lot, and 

westerly side, Tremont street to 

Cambridge line, paving . . 451.65 

Repairs ..... 56.00 

Webster avenue, westerly side 

Tremont to Prospect street 

paving ..... 271.55 

Ordinary repairs of streets : 

Broadway, at Willow bridge . S 198.00 

Elm street, from Willow avenue to 

Cedar street .... 1,740.60 

Highland avenue, from Central 
street westerly and easterly, 200 
feet each wav ' . . . 279.80 

Medford street, from Somerville 

avenue to Fitchburg railroad . 1,649.45 

School street, from Berkeley street 

to Somerville avenue . . 765.80 

Washington street, Fitchburg rail- 
road to Beacon street . . 3,923.60 
General repairs . . . 10,201.27 



421 
S6,112.15 



85,928.40 



818,758.52 



Amount carried forward 



830,799.07 



422 



ANNUAL RErORTS. 



Amount brought for2va7'd .... $30,799.07 
Cost to City of sidewalks, the bricks and edgestones 
for which were furnished or paid for by the 
abutters (see Table D at end of this report) . 2,110.38 
Books, stationery and printing . . . 70.00 
Glen Street sewer assessment .... 15.88 
Sundry small expenses ..... 125.19 
Repairs of house at Wellington bridge . . 36.52 
Removing snow and ice and care of slippery side- 
walks 3,814.38 

Repairs of brick sidewalks .... 3,138.75 

Cleaning streets ...... 6,525.95 

Setting stone bounds ..... 39.00 

Setting trees 229.40 

Trimming trees . . . . . . 302.80 

Building at crusher ...... 269.63 

Laying out triangular lot, Broadway at junction of 

Holland street 115.46 

Repairs of Boston Avenue bridge . . . 190.37 

Insurance and grading around new City stable 1,212.95 
Opening of street, Westwood road at Central 

street 20.61 

Opening of street, Westwood road at Benton ave- 
nue 23.55 

Superintendent's salary ..... 1,600.00 

Board of Superintendent's horses . . . 417.17 

Superintendent's telephone . . . . 2.95 
One half cost of maintenance of Middlesex Ave- 
nue bridge, the other half being paid by the 

City of Medford 425.99 

Clearing Cross and Pearl streets, after relaying of 

tracks by the West End Street Railway Co. . 1,643.35 
Private work, the bills for which remain uncol- 
lected 457.05 

Value of materials on hand this day . . . 1,200.00 



Amount carried forwa7'd 



$54,786.40 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OX HIGHWAYS. 



A mount brought forward . 
Value of tools and personal property 
on hand this day : 

Horses ..... 
Carts and implements used with 

Horses .... 
Harnesses and horse clothing 
Stable utensils and property 
Tools .... 

Stone crusher and fittings . 
Steam road roller 

Net loss on tools, property and mate- 
rials ..... 

Total debit . 

Balance unexpended 



$3,100.00 

1,718.00 
256.00 
29.85 
1,279.55 
2,202.00 
2,055.00 



423 

$54,786.40 



$10,640.40 
8,065.54 

S73,492.34 
S491.19 



Labor and materials have also been furnished and property sold, 
for which payment has been received by the City Treasurer or credit 
received from other accounts, as follows : 



Private parties, constructing driveways and side- 
walks ........ 

Fire Department account, constructing driveways 
(Central Fire Station and Hook and Ladder 
House, Highland avenue) .... 

Public Grounds account, sidewalk, Nathan Tufts 
Park 

Sidewalks account, materials and use of horses . 



$2,582.94 



1,284.06 

1,079.94 
1,897.74 



Total 



$6,844.68 



424 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



The Profit and Loss account on city teams, tools, property and 
materials is as follows : 

Debit. 

Steam road roller (depreciation) 
Repairs of steam road roller 



Tools (depreciation) 

Repairs of tools 

Stone crusher and fittings . 

Holland Street ledge 

Edgestones and paving stock 

Crushed stone (to which amount is 

charged repairs at crusher) 
City teams .... 

Total . 



$1,132.21 
856.95 
455.16 
262.42 
217.00 
1,911.70 
10.31 

3,056.32 
163.47 



,065.54 



No charge has been made for the use of the steam roller on the 
streets, except for the time of the engineer, at the same rate as in 
former years. 

Crushed stone placed on the streets has been charged at the rate 
of seventy-five cents for each single load at the crusher, being the 
same rate as has been charged each year. 

Gravel has been charged at the rate of twenty-five cents per single 
horse load, and sand at the rate of fifty cents per single horse load. 



Number of loads of gravel taken from North 
Street bank . . . . . . 

Number of loads of sand taken from North Street 
bank ........ 

Number of loads of stone for crusher from Holland 
Street ledge ....... 

Number of loads of stone crushed 



5,135 

1,409 

5,618 
9,475 



The charges to the City Teams account are as follows : 

Horses (depreciation) ..... $1,095.00 

Carts and implements used with horses (deprecia- 
tion) 992.00 



Amount carried fo7"ward . 



$2,087.00 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OX HIGHWAYS. 



Amou7it brought forward 
Repairs of same . 
Stable Utensils and property 
Stable expenses and repairs . 
Grain and feed . 
Hay and straw 
Horseshoeing 
Horse medicine and doctoring 
Harnesses and horse clothing (de 
Repairs of same . 

Total 



preciation) 



425 



62,087.00 

772.36 

55.85 

1,419.47 

2,929.20 

1,722.48 

760.56 

115.90 

143.00 

575.05 

610,580.87 



The above statement does not include the keeping or use of the 
Superintendent of Streets' team, the cost of which is kept separately, 
as stated in table of expenditures. Each horse is credited at the rate 
of $1.40 for each day he works during the year. 

Five new horses have been purchased during the year at a cost of 
6935 ; one has been sold for 840, and two have died, making the total 
number of horses in the department, including the two used by the 
Superintendent of Streets, twenty-eight, being two more than in 1893. 



SIDEWALKS ACCOUNT. 




Credit. 






Appropriation ..... 


. 


610,000.00 


Debit. 






Expenditures : 






For 33 sidewalks, as per table C 






at the end of this report . 


819,811.22 




Abatement of sidewalk assess- 






ment. Beacon street 


31.67 




Thomas Groom & Co., books 


26.00 






619,868.89 




Less assessments and receipt 


9,905.65 




Cost to City .... 




69,963.24 


Balance unexpended . 


636.76 



426 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



EDGESTONES AND PAVING STOCK. 

Lineal feet of edgestones set (including 4,333 feet reset), 
20,452.3 ; square yards of brick paving laid (including 4,070 yards 
relaid), 16,511.4; square yards of stone paving laid (including 750 
relaid), 7,567. 

CITY STABLE. (New.) 



Credit 


• 




Appropriation .... 


. 


$14,500.00 


Debit. 






Expenditures : 






A. H. Gould, on account of archi- 






tect's services . . . . 


$ 560.35 




Lord Bros., on account of contract . 


9,000.00 




Laying service pipe 


15.00 




Laying drain . . . . 


711.53 




Vane . . . . . 


65.00 




Total debit . 




$10,351.88 


Balance unexpended 


$4,148.12 



TABLES. 

Tables are furnished herewith, giving lists of streets accepted, 
streets improved, sidewalks constructed for which one half the cost 
was assessed, sidewalks constructed, the bricks and edgestones for 
which were furnished by the abutters, driveways constructed at the 
abutters' expense, and crossings laid. 



F. W. GILBERT, Chairman. 
WILLIAM P. MITCHELL, Clerk, 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS. 



427 



TABLE A. 



STREETS ACCEPTED. 



Name. 



Bartlett . . 
Bigelow . 
Claremon . 
Curter avenue 
Cypress 
Delaware . 
Fanning avenue 
Hall avenue 
Hancock 
Knapp . 
Leon 
Lowell . 

Munroe . 

Porter 
Robinson 
Trull . 
Waldo . 

Warwick 
Westwood road 



From. 



To. 



Medford . . 
Boston 

Holland . . 
Highland avenue 
Central 
Pearl . . . 
Highland avenue 
Elm . . . 
Elm . . . 
School 

Concord avenue 
Medford . . 

Walnut . . 

Highland avenue 
Central 

Medford . . . 
Highland avenue 
Cedar . , . . 
Central 



Vernon .... 
Munroe .... 
Mead .... 
Summer .... 
Beach .... 
Aldrich .... 
Lexington avenue . 
Liberty avenue 
Summer . . . . 
Granite .... 
Dickinson . 
Vernon .... 
To land of Hartwell 
and Jones 
Summer .... 
Bartlett .... 
Vernon .... 
Hudson .... 
Warwick avenue . 
Benton avenue 



Length in 
Feet. 



820 
208 
560 
480 
262 
451 
376 
926 
781 
379 
155 
1,141 

375 

830 

582 

1,050 

287 

665 

487 



428 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE B. 



STREETS IMPROVED. 



Street. 


From. 


To. 


Improvement. 


Feet. 


BiUingham 


William . . . 


Broadway . 


Macadamized . 


568 


Central . 






Highland avenue 


Railroad 


Macadamized . 


500 


Claremon . 






Holland . 


Mead . . . 


Macadamized . 


560 


Cross 






Broadway 


Gilman . 


Regraded . 


1,800 


Cross 






Broadway 


Mystic avenue 


Macadamized . 


2,000 


Elm . . 






Junction of . 


Broadway . 


Macadamized . 


400 


Elm . . 






Beach .... 


Soraerville ave. 


Macadamized . 


2,000 


Essex . 






Richdale avenue 


Medford . . 


Macadamized . 


232 


Gorham 






Holland . . . 


Howard 


Remacadamized 


763 


Greenville . 






Medford . . . 


High . . . 


Macadamized . 


660 


Hall avenue 






Elm ... . 


Easterly . . 


Macadamized . 


500 


Heath . . 






Temple 


Bond . . . 


Macadamized . 


1.043 


Highland avenue 


Central 


Westerly 


Macadamized . 


300 


Highland av. and ) 
Medford street / 


In front of . 


Cen. Fire Station 


Remacadamized 


500 


Hudson 


Lowell . . 


Cedar 


Graded . . . 


1,380 


Medford . . 




Washington . 


Somerville ave. 


Macadamized . 


1,000 


Medford . . 




School . . 


Lee .... 


Remacadamized 


1,000 


Munroe 




Walnut . . . 


Easterly 


Macadamized . 


375 


Partridge avenue 




Broadway 


Medford . . 


Macadamized . 


300 


Porter . 




Highland avenue 


Summer . . 


Macadamized . 


830 


School . 




Berkeley . . . 


Somerville ave. 


Macadamized . 


1,200 


Washington . 




Union square 


Beacon . 


Macadamized . 


2,000 


Total length 


improved 


(in feet) 




19,911 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OX HIGHWAYS. 



429 



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430 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CO-MMIITEE OX HIGHWAYS. 



431 



TABLE D. 

SIDEWALKS CONSTRUCTED WHERE THE EDGESTONES AND 
BRICKS WERE FURNISHED OR PAID FOR BY THE 

ABUTTERS. 



For. 



Street. 



Co. 



Fanny I. Bradshaw 
Charles F. Brine . 
John H. Brine . . 
George W. Bean . 
Luizde Soma Bettencurtt 
Barnabas Binney . 
Boston & Maine R. R 
William A. Campbell 
Mary Dorney . . 
Olive H. Durell 
William A. Flaherty 
Nathan E. Fitz . . 
George G. Fox . 
George G. Fox . . 
George G. Fox . 
George G. Fox . . 
Ann Fitzpatrick 
Lavina P. Fuller 
John L. Greenough 
Anthony Haderbolets 
J. F. Ham . . . 
Florence E. Holmes 
Emma O. Hill . 
Joseph K. James 
F. M. Kilmer . 
Edward Keating 
John Kelliher 
E. W. Lundhall . 
Mary Langmaid 
Heirs S. P. Langmaid 
David L. McGregor . 
Christopher T. McGrath 
Christopher T. McGrath 
William Mullan . . . 
Michael Martell . . 
Alexander Munroe 
Ellen A. Murphy . . 
New England Dressed Meat 

and Wool Co. 
North Packing and Provision 

Co 

James O'Donnell 
Mary O'Donnell 
Antonia Preiva . 
David Rosenfeld 
Harriet E. Snow 



Westwood road . . . 
30 Columbus ave. 
38 Columbus ave. . . 
40 Columbus ave. 

59 Webster ave. . 

Vernon st 

Davis sq 

280 Cedar st 

01 Webster ave. . . . 

53 Chandler st. ... 
201 Washington st. . . 
335 Broadway .... 
309 Broadway .... 

Fenwick st 

Bond st 

Heath st 

03 Webster ave. . . . 

Walnut st 

Vernon st 

Walnut st 

102 Flint st 

Heath st 

Prospect Hill ave. . . 
Belmont st 

54 Adams st 

Kent st 

288 Cedar st 

5 Billingham st. . . . 
345 Broadway .... 

Fenwick st 

139 Walnut st. ... 
Kingman court . . 
274 Washington st. . . 
16 and 18 Kingman court 
57 Webster ave. . . 
Newton st 

60 Webster ave. . . . 



Feet of 
Edge- 
stones. 



70.0 



Medford st. 



Medford st. . . 
92 Webster ave. . 
94 Webster ave. . 
55 Webster ave. . 

Main st 

14 Kingman court 



33. 

38.4 

80.0 

38. 

53. 

25.9 



108.4 

120.5 

207.8 

34. 

38. 



141.8 

120.7 

65.9 

38. 

44.7 

104.1 

160.9 
34.9 
42. 
33. 

30. 

427.1 

431.8 
35. 
66. 
17. 
77.9 
21. 



Yards of 
Bricks. 



28 
28 
29 



125 



18 
14 
71 
157 
92 
95 



85 

22 
27 

64 

88 
18 



33 
180 
180 
33 
65 
45 
21 

90 



10 



432 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



TABLE T>.— Concluded. 



For. 


Street. 


Feet of 
Edge- 
Stones. 


Yards of 
Bricks. 


Edmund S. Sparrow . 
Martha M. Sturtevant 
Somerville Journal Co. 
Isabella F. Silva . . 
William Veazie . . . 
Warren P. Wilder . . 
Samuel H. Wilkins . 




18 Meacham st 

Sanborn ave 

Walnut st 

68 Webster ave • 

135 Walnut st 

Summer st. 

1()9 Orchard st. . . . . 


97.8 
102.3 

40. 
139.3 


93 
70 

77 

117 
67 


Total 




3,131.4 


2 042 











TABLE E. 

DRIVEWAYS CONSTRUCTED AT EXPENSE OF ABUTTERS. 



For. 



Margaret A. Brown 

City of Somerville (Fire Department) 
City of Somerville (Fire Department) 

Hiram A. Clarry 

Edward Cox 

George W. Clark 

W. A. Crosby 

James P. Haddie ...'.... 
Edward J. Llewellyn ..".... 

Charles O. Lailer 

Charles Lynam 

Fred L. Pulsifer 

George B. Pitcher 

Catherine J. Sherry 

Eugene Selg 

John Sweeney 

Addie A. Snow 

Harmon S. Trueman 

Andrew Thompson 



Location. 



24 Cutter street . 
Highland avenue . 
Medford street 
Cross street 
63 and Qb Bow street 
40 Prescott street . 
34 Rush street 
Somerville avenue 
216 Somerville avenue 
369 Medford street . 
6 Chandler street . 
55 Prescott street . 
Preston street . 
32 Prescott street . 
15 Adams street . 
212 Somerville avenue 
34 Preston street . 
145 Summer street 
275 Washington street 



REPORT OF THE COISIMITTEE OX HIGHWAYS. 433 



TABLE F. 

CROSSINGS CONSTRUCTED. 

Broadway, across end of Autumn street. 

Cross street, in line with the northeasterly side of Pearl street. 
Cross street, northwesterly side, across end of Otis street. 
Cross street, southeasterly side, across end of Ellsworth street. 
Cross street, southeasterly side, across Pearl street. 
Elm street, in line with the southwesterly side of William street, 
Elm street, northwesterly, across end of Chapel street. 
Holland street, westerly side, across end of Thorndike street. 
Munroe street, across same, in front of house No. 81. 
Summer street, westerly side, across end of Quincy street. 
Union square, across end of Bow street. 
Union square, across end of Warren avenue. 



(27) 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON SEWERS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Hoard of Aldermen, March 13, 1895. 
Referred to Commiltee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 



Sent down for concurrence. 



GEORGE I. VINXENT, Clerk. 



, In Common Council, March 14, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



{ 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Committee on Sewers, January 1, 1805. 
To THE Board of Aldermen of Somerville : — 

The Committee on Sewers presents the following final report for 
the year 1894 : — 

MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 

Appropriation ........ $7, 000. 00 

Receipts and Credits : 

For fee for drainage of asylum build- 
ing into Fitchburg Street sewer S50.00 
labor and materials furnished in 
1893, the bills for which re- 
mained uncollected January 1, 

1894 32.53 

dividend on private sewer Timothy 

Tufts, built in 1888 . . 7.80 

90.33 

Value of tools and property on hand, January 1, 1894, 

transferred from Construction account . . 53.84 

Value of tools and property on hand January 1, 1894 823,60 

Value of materials on hand, January 1, 1894 . . 70.06 

Total credit . . S8,037.83 



438 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Debit. 



Expenditures : 



For repairing sewers and drains . 

inspecting house drains . 

flushing sewers and filhng catch-basins 

cleaning catch-basins 

repairing catch-basins 

opening mouths of catch-basins 

changing Une and grade of catch-basins 

examining catch-basins 

cleanino; sewers .... 

changing Hne and grade of manholes 

changing line and grade of manholes for West 
End Street Railway Co 

repairing manholes . 

cleaning manholes . 

ex'amining manholes 

examining sewers 

soundings for ledge . 

cleaning ditches 

cleaning and dredging Bridge Street sewer out 
let 

removing earth after completion of sewers 

connecting High School drain with Highland 
Avenue sewer ..... 

digging to locate old sewer 

sundry expenses ..... 

A. M. Prescott, bill overpaid to December 31 
1894 

books, stationery and printing . 

unpaid bills of 1893 .... 

arranging tools and property 

repairs of tools and property 
Depreciation in value of tools, property and ma- 
terials ....... 

Value of materials on hand, December 31, 1894 

Amount canded forward .... 



% 132.18 
453.10 
501.52 
1,754.86 
179.11 
198.88 
159.51 
6.75 
280.12 
116.71 

122.08 
13.90 

148.49 

42.00 

51.01 

3.25 

314.26 

2,402.03 
11.75 

13.56 

2.50 

116.42 

35.00 
38.00 
3.50 
20.00 
24.26 

255.53 
40.02 

^7,440.30 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OX SEWERS. 439 

Amount brought forward .... 87,440.30 

Value of materials on hand transferred to Construc- 
tion account ...... 30.00 

Value of tools and property on hand December 31, 

1894 (including purchases during the year, 

S179.72) 732.25 

Total debit . . . S8,202.55 



Amount overdrawn . 8164.72 

Labor and materials have also been furnished and credit has been 
received for the same as follows : 

Public Grounds account, materials furnished at Cen- 
tral Hill and Somerville Avenue cemetery . S 1.00 
Puddling sewer trenches ...... 20.64 

Removing earth after completion of sewer . . 9.64 

Repairing drain ....... 6.25 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 

Appropriation 820,000.00 

Unexpended balance of 1893 . . 256.75 



Receipts and Credits : 

For catch-basin curbs in sidewalks, 
received credit from Sidewalks 
account ..... $ 44.32 

fee for drainage of estates into 

Line Street sewer . . . 100.63 

labor and materials furnished in 
1893, the bills for which re- 
mained uncollected January 1, 
1894 17.44 



Total .... 837.53 



820,256.75 



S 162.39 

unpaid bills of 1894 . . . 2,425.84 

Value of materials on hand January 1, 1894 . . 52.61 

822,897.59 



440 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Debit. 



Expenditures : 



For twenty-four sewers as per ac- 
companying table . 

Less cost of sounding for ledge, 
Hall Avenue sewer, paid in 1 892 



Less assessments 



$15,602.64 
29.74 

$15,572.90 
12,112.61 



$3,460.29 



For fifty-five catch-basins (average cost $72.14) 3,967.65 

rebuilding manhole at end of North Union Street 

sewer ........ 263.52 

awards for taking of land, Hall avenue, Kidder 

avenue and Francesca avenue . . . 200.00 

laying drain from pond on line of sewer, Austin 

street and Mystic avenue to North Union street 59.25 

laying drain at Central Fire station . . . 107.01 

laying drain. Grove street, east side, north line of 

railroad . . . . . . . 28.32 

laying surface drain, Cameron avenue, westerly . 64.76 

digging for ledge ...... 274.98 

. relocating catch-basin, Hamlet street . . 29.49 

extending outlet of North Union Street sewer . 14.00 

books, stationery and printing .... 17.00 

sundry expenses ...... 57.76 

abatement of sewer assessments . . . 233.50 

unpaid bills of 1893 6,111.99 

Value of materials on hand December 31, 1894 . 30.00 

Total debit . . . $14,919.52 



Balance unexpended 



$7,978.07 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OX SE^^'ERS. 441 

Labor and materials have also been furnished and credit has been 
received for the same as follows : 

Highways account, constructing sewer and drain at 

new City stables at City Farm . . . S702.21 

Joseph F. Wilson, constructing sewer in passageway 

off Newbury street ..... 70.93 

Henry Green, drainage of lots in Cambridge into 

Line Street sewer ..... 100.63 

J. E. Parsons, constructing sewer, Pearl street . . 97.97 



Total .... S971.74 

Appended hereto is a table of sewers built during the year. 

Twenty-four sewers have been built during the year, being two less 
than in 1893. 

Fifty-five catch-basins have been built, while in 1894 there were 
but thirty- eight. 

For the committee, 

FRANKLIN F. PHILLIPS, Chairman. 
WILLIAM P. :MITCHELL, Clerk. 



44:2 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT IN 1894. 









Length 


Total 


Assess- 


Cost to 


Street. 


From. 


To. 
















IN Feet. 


Cost. 


ment. 


City. 


Central street and 
Westwood road 


Berkeley street 
Central street 


Westwood road 
Benton avenue 


628.5 


$1,364.28 


$ 853.05 


$ 511.23 


Cross Street place 


Cross street 


Westerly 


122.8 


45.69 


45.24 


.45 


Congress place 


Linwood street 


Southwesterly 


115.6 


66.71 




66.71 


Elmwood street 


East of 


On private land 




147.06 




147.06 


Glen street 


Fountain ave. 

330 feet East Elm 
St., private lands 
from Hall av., 


Northeasterly 

1 


153.1 


108.52 


23.98 


84.54 


Hall avenue and 


in Francesca av., 
east'ly & west'ly 
from private 
lands, and in 
Kidder avenue 


Near 










private lands 
and Francesca 


Liberty ave. 
Kidder ave. 


1,898.6 


4,463.89 


3,020.11 


1,443.78 


and Kidder aves 


Private lands 












east'ly & west'ly 














from 813 feet 














northeast 












Jenny Lind ave. 


From Medford st. 


Near Broadway 


257.8 


312.31 


306.87 


5.44 


Laurel place 


Laurel street 


Westerly 


186. 


311.98 


58 93 


253.05 


Leland street 


Washington st. 


Northeasterly 


262.8 


219.12 


218.39 


.73 


Melvin street 


273 feet from 
Broadway 


Southwesterly 


73.4 


57.74 


56.38 


1.36 


Mystic avenue 


Austin street 


No. Union street 


unfinished 


28.00 




28.00 


North Union st. 
extension 


Mystic river 


No. Union street 


" 


291.74 




291.74 


North Union st. 


65 feet southeriy 
from Mousal pi. 
Pearl Street 


Southwesterly 


192.9 


301.72 


298.07 


3.65 


Pearl Street pi. 


Northeasterly 


170.5 


122.34 


121.78 


.56 


Pitman street 


Spring Street 


Northwesterly 


unfinished 


64.25 




64.25 


Private lands and 
Talbot avenue 


Broadway and in 

Talbot av. e'st'ly 

50 ft. southeast'ly 


Talbot avenue 
College avenue 


1,800.4 


1,920.89 


1,917.56 


3.33 


Putnam street and 
Highland ave. 


from Highland 


Highland avenue 


232.9 


314.24 


148.99 


165.25 


avenue, and in 


Westerly 












Highland ave. 












Snow terrace 


Jaques street 


Southwesterly 


125.2 


191.09 


14.42 


176.67 


Summer street 


Cedar street 


Southeasterly 


257.5 


262.28 


252.26 


10.02 


Summer street 


Willow avenue 


Easterly 


799.3 


915.58 


907.81 


7.77 


Talbot and 


Private lands and 


Packard avenue 
Westerly 










Packard aves. 


in Packard ave. 


1,788.6 


3,609.42 


3,608.90 


.52 


and Sawyer ave. 


and Sawyer ave. 










Sycamore street 


Medford street 


Southwesterly 


220.4 


140.16 


136.64 


3.52 


Wheeler street 


Pinckney street 


Southeasterly 


202.1 


203.27 


123.23 


80.04 


Willow avenue 


Morrison street 


Southerly 




140.36 




140.36 




9,488.4 


$15,602.64 


$12,11261 


$3,490.03 


Less paid on Hal 


1 Avenue sewer in 


1890 






29.74 








$3,460.29 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY ENGINEER 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, April lo, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, April 11, 1895. 

Concurred in. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of City Engineer, 
SoMERviLLE, April 8, 1895. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the City Council : — 

In compliance with City Ordinance, Chapter 9, Section 9, the fol- 
lowing report of the City Engineer for the year ending December 31, 
1894, is respectfully submitted : — 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

The number of persons permanently employed during the year 
has been nine. 

The expenses of the department have been as follows : 



Salary of City Engineer ..... 


$2,400.00 


Salary of assistants ...... 


6,595.68 


Supplies ........ 


99.85 


Car fares ....... 


119.21 


Tapes, plumbs, tools and spikes 


67.26 


Repairs and adjustment of instruments and tools 


25.70 


Stakes ........ 


28.50 



$9,336.20 

The items of expenditures of salaries of assistants are as follows : 

Giving lines and grades for edgestone and brick side- 
walks, examining titles of abutters, and comput- 
ing assessments and cost 



Amount carried forward 
(28) 



$808.99 



8808.99 



446 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount brought forward ..... % 808.99 

Giving lines and grades for defining street lines, for 
grading and macadamizing streets, revising ac- 
ceptance plans, and examining titles of abutters 769.35 
Making surveys and giving lines and grades for public 
sewers, examining titles of abutters, computing 
assessments and making assessment plans, locat- 
ing and recording private drains, giving lines and 
grades for building catch-basins, and rebuilding 
old sewers . . . . . . . . 1,629.04 

Giving lines and grades for laying water-pipe, mak- 
ing surveys and plans, locating and recording 
locations of mains, services, afifixing house numbers 
to service applications ..... 400.61 

City survey . . . . . . . . 552.45 

Grade and lines, and clerical work for department of 

public grounds ....... 292.72 

Surveys and plans, grades, lines Nathan Tufts Park . 555.60 

Preparing plans for numbering streets and affixing 

street numbers to houses ..... 375.60 

Indexing note-books and plans and keeping office 

records 200.22 

Copying plans at Middlesex Registry of Deeds and 

work done for the assessors' department . . 57.95 

City map 84.10 

Surveys, lines and grades for street railroads . . 249.94 

Surveys and lines for Somerville Electric Light Co. . 27.92 

Miscellaneous, including sketches and plans for police 
and law departments used in accident cases, sur- 
veys and estimates for public property department, 
lines and grades for pubHc buildings . . . 591.19 



City Survey. 



1,595.68 



The appropriation made for the City Survey in 1894 was included 
in that made for salaries of engineers' assistants, but the amount of 
work which the engineers' department was called upqn to perform was 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 447 

SO large that the entire amount appropriated was needed for the reg- 
ular office work. 

It is important that some progress should be made in this work of 
making a systematic survey of the city during the coming year, be- 
cause of the demands that will inevitably be made within a short time 
for sewers and water, for the laying out of new streets, and the Metro- 
politan Park boulevards. 

The larger part of the city west of Cedar street, equal to about one 
third of the entire area of the city, has not been surveyed, neither has 
any sewerage system been designed, nor are there any materials, notes, 
plans or surveys on file in this office from which a sewerage system or 
water distribution can be designed. 

The whole district above referred to should be accurately and 
carefully surveyed, and the notes plotted on sectional plans of small 
size to be conveniently filed, and from these plans a study can be 
made for sewers and water mains. 

This work should be undertaken at once, that sufficient time may 
be given the engineers' department to prepare this work before it is 
needed. If it is delayed until it is actually needed, the work must be 
done in a hurry, and the results will not only be unsatisfactory because 
of the haste in which the work is done, but delays must necessarily occur 
in complying with requests of the Board of Aldermen for estimates 
and plans, because of the time required to do the work. Accurate 
plans of the part of the city above referred to would be of great value 
to the assessors' department in locating property and recording trans- 
fers, and it is undoubtedly true that the value of such a set of plans 
would be worth to this department alone more than the cost of the work. 
It is probable that the public will soon demand that all wires re- 
quired for electric lighting, telephone, telegraph and fire-alarm uses 
be placed in underground conduits. When this work is decided upon 
it will first be necessary to know the location of all underground con- 
struction, whether used for sewer, water or gas purposes, and accurate 
plans will then be needed on which these locations can be recorded. 

When this department is called upon for information, it is expected 
that it will be furnished at once and without delay, but it will be im- 
possible to do such work within any reasonable time unless the work 
of the office can be kept in advance of the needs of the city or the re- 
quirements of the City Council. 



448 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

On page 446 it will be noticed that $552.45 has been expended 
on the city survey during the past year. The work done has been 
made necessary by the construction of sewers and the making of 
assessment plans, and the areas surveyed have been in isolated districts. 
The cost of making small surveys of this kind is excessive in first cost, 
and must be further increased by the work necessary to correct errors 
that will be found when a systematic survey of the city is made. 

The attention of the City Council is directed to the reports of the 
City Engineer for the years 1891, 1892, 1893, 1894, in which the need 
of making such a survey as is recommended, and the request heretofore 
made that an appropriation of $500 be made for extending the city 
survey is repeated. 

Street Monuments. 

The correct location of the line of every estate, and especially of 
lines separating adjacent estates, must be referred to the street line of 
the street on which it is located and also to the nearest intersecting 
street, for in this way the exact location of any such line can be 
determined by measurement from these street lines ; hence, that 
there may be no doubt as to the location of these lines, and conse- 
quently of all estate lines, it is important that the street lines should 
be marked or designated by some method by which they can be readily 
found by any one, and at the same time the method adopted must 
be such that they will be preserved in the same location forever. 

The method usually adopted is the placing at the intersection of the 
side lines of intersecting streets, or at the angles or at the ends of 
curves in the street, stone monuments or posts made of sufficient 
depth that when placed m the ground they will not be moved by the 
action of the severest frosts, and marked or cut by a drill hole in the 
top at the intersection of the two lines it is proposed to define the 
location of. 

When such monuments are properly placed, and their locations 
definitely recorded, there is furnished a visible and exact location 
and determination of the line of the street ; and the engineer who is 
■called upon to lay out a ho.use lot, to survey an estate, or the City 
Engineer who is ordered to lay out a sewer, or define a street line, 
•either for edgestone, street railway tracks, electric light poles, the lay- 
ing of water pipes, or the various other uses for which the public use 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 449 

the Streets, has no difficulty in determining a street line or doing his 
work with the least possible difficulty and delay, and the least possible 
chance of error. 

The City of Somerville has never made a systematic effort to place 
stone monuments to define its street lines. 

In 1860 a survey of the town (known as the Richardson survey) 
was made, and at that time many stone monuments were set, on the 
centre lines of the streets ; but excavations since made for sewer con- 
struction have caused the removal of many of them. There is no 
record of the number of monuments set in 1860, but at the present 
time about one hundred and seventeen monuments can be found that 
were set in 1860, about one hundred were set in 1877, and thirty-five in 
1884. Since 1884 no monuments have been set, and there are to-day 
but about two hundred and fifty monuments on fifty-two miles of public 
streets; that is, only one monument exists for every eleven hundred 
feet of street. 

Instead of being referred to permanent marks, street Hues are now 
fixed by measurements from buildings recorded in note-books or 
on plans, or by spikes driven in the earth at intersections of street 
lines. 

The notes are capable of different interpretation by different engi- 
neers, and a great deal of time is lost in endeavoring to establish 
street lines from these notes, or in replacing spikes that may have 
been disturbed by the slightest movement of the ground. Many times 
during the past year, the office has been called upon to adjust street 
lines that other engineers have been unable to run from the imperfect 
notes that now define street lines. 

It will benefit the land owner, make the lines of estates more per- 
manent, and greatly relieve the office force of a constant repetition of 
work in continually replacing points defining street lines that cannot 
be permanently defined unless stone monuments are set as recom- 
mended. It will also place the city in line with what is being done to- 
day in nearly every large town or city. 

The attention of the City Council is referred to the annual reports 
of the City Engineer for the years 1892, 1893, for further information 
on this subject, and the recommendation heretofore made, that an 
appropriation of $500 be made for this purpose is repeated. 



450 annual reports. 

City Map. 

The work on the city map has been pushed during the winter, but 
progress is necessarily slow because of the lack of any method of 
checking the work already done on local surveys. 

Several traverses have been compiled, but errors were found that 
have taken a great deal of time to eliminate. In connection with this 
work it has been found that a new survey of the city, as heretofore 
referred to, would be of the greatest value in correcting and complet- 
ing the city map. 

City Engineer's Office. 

The room assigned the City Engineer and the tables and cases for 
fiUng plans and doing the work of the office, are entirely too small and 
limited to accomplish the work to be done. It is impossible to accom- 
plish half the results desired with the limited space assigned the City 
Engineer at the City Hall. 

The vault for storing note-books and plans is entirely too small, 
and if the building were destroyed by fire it is certain that every note- 
book and plan, the accumulation from surveys and calculations made 
during the last twenty-five years would be entirely destroyed, as well as 
the records of surveys of at least two thirds the area of the city ; 
plans showing the location and depths of sewers, and the locations of 
house drains for about sixty miles of sewers ; the plans of fifty miles 
of public streets j and plans of estates made during the last twenty- 
five years. 

What the expense of replacing the records and plans contained in 
this vault would be, no one can determine ; but it is certain to re- 
place these records would require a resurvey of the city, including 
street lines, property lines and buildings, the re-establishing of every 
street line in the city, that new plans be made of all the sewers in the 
city ; an expense undoubtedly equal to the cost of a new City Hall. 

I would therefore recommend that new rooms be provided for the 
City Engineer's department, that a thoroughly fireproof room of ample 
dimensions be built before these valuable records are destroyed. 

Plans at Middlesex Registry of Deeds. 

Tracings have been made of all plans of real estate in Somerville 
recorded at the registry of deeds during the year 1894, and an index 



REPORT OF THE CIT\' ENGINEER. 451 

has been made showing the street, owner's name and surveyor's name, 
date and record of these plans have been compiled. 

Profiles have been made for establishing the grade of seven and 
one-half miles of street, and two and seven-tenths miles of sewers. 

Grades have been given for two and one-tenth miles of edgestone, 
and measurement made and assessments computed for the same length 
of edgestone, and ten thousand three hundred and ninety-nine square 
yards of brick sidewalk. Grades and lines have been given for ninety- 
six estates. 

Assessment plans have been made for ten thousand three hundred 
and five lineal feet of sewers. Three hundred and seventy water ser- 
vices have been located, and the location recorded. The numbers on 
houses have been compared with the plans, corrections made, and all 
houses completed May 1, 1894, were numbered. In Appendix G 
will be found an ordinance regulating the City Engineer's Department. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Assessments have been levied for ten thousand three hundred and 
five and two-tenths feet, or one and ninety-five one-hundredths miles of 
public sewers, at a cost of 815,759.34; of this amount 812,799.05 was 
assessed on abutters, and 82,960.29 has been assumed by the city, and 
paid from Funded Debt account. In addition to this amount one 
thousand three hundred and ninety-two and four- tenths lineal feet of 
sewer were contracted for in 1894, but have not been completed 
December 31, 1894. 

Private Drains. 

Four hundred and forty-six permits for laying house drains, and 
thirty-nine for repairs of drains were issued during the year. These 
drains have all been located, the locations referred to the street lines and 
side lines of the house, properly recorded in note-books, plotted on . 
the assessment plans and indexed. 

The cost of inspection of house drains was 8453.10. 

Catch-Basins. 
Fifty-two catch-basins were built during the year at a cost of 
13,822.71 j three have been rebuilt at a cost of 8119.29. The number 
of catch-basins in use January 1, 1895, was eight hundred and two. 



452 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Twenty-one catch-basins have been repaired at a cost of $179.11 ; an 
average cost of $8.53. 

The cost of changing the grade and line of eighteen catch-basins 
was $159.51, an average cost of $8.86. 

Nine hundred fifty-seven catch-basins have been cleaned ; one 
thousand seven hundred eighty-one loads, or two thousand fifty-four 
cubic yards of material were removed and disposed of at a cost of 
$1,754.86, an average cost of $1.83 per basin, $0.99 per load, and 
$0.84 per cubic yard. 

The cost of removing snow, ice and street dirt from catch-basin 
openings was $198.88. Eleven miles of pipe sewers were flushed at 
a cost of $439.63; an average cost per mile of $40, or $7.60 per 
thousand feet. One and one-third miles of brick sewers were cleaned 
at a cost of $280.12 ; an average cost per mile of $210.62, or $51.34 
per thousand feet. 

The cost of cleaning out-fall ditches at Winthrop avenue, Austin, 
North Union and Waverly street was $314.26. 

Manholes. 

The cost of changing the grade and line of sixty-six manholes was 
$221.52, an average cost of $3.36. 

The cost of cleaning one hundred and seven manhole dirt-catchers 
was $148.44, an average cost of $1.13. 

Bridge Street Outlet. 
The cost of dredging was ..... $4,323.67 

The items of cost are as follows : — 

Three thousand eight hundred and 

forty-one cubic yards of material 

dredged at $0.64 . . . $2,458.24 
.Removal of shoal at end Bridge street 

pipes 1,650.00 

Labor, advertising, teaming, water and 

clothing 215.43 



$4,323.67 



Five-ninths of this amount, $2,402.03, was paid by the City of 
Somerville, the balance by the City of Cambridge. The item of 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 453 

$1,650 was the cost of removing material from the outlet end of the 
iron pipe out-fall near the channel. 

Extension of the Winthrop Avenue Sewer. 

The attention of the City Council has been regularly called, 
every year since 1888, to the existing condition of the out-fall ditch at 
the end of the Winthrop Avenue Sewer ; it is certain that action by the 
City Council can no longer be delayed, and that this sewer must be 
extended to the Mystic River. 

The attention of the City Council is hereby called to the several 
reports of the City Engineer since the year 1888, for further informa- 
tion with regard to the evils existing, and suggestions made to remedy 
them. 

Intercepting Sewer in the Location of the Boston & Lowell 

Railroad. 

In the area bounded by Cross and Medford streets. Highland 
avenue. Willow avenue and Broadway, the existing sewers are very 
much too small to properly dispose of the areas they drain, so much 
so that during heavy rain storms these sewers are surcharged to such an 
extent that the storm water is forced through the house drains into 
cellars, and frequently streets are flooded and water is forced through 
the manhole covers. In a large part of this area no sewers have been 
constructed, and large tracts of land remain unoccupied because there 
is no outlet for the drainage of these areas. 

In still other parts of this area sewers have been built on the sepa- 
rate system, without any provision for disposing of storm water, and the 
result is that street surfaces are washed out by every heavy rain, and 
cellars and private lands are flooded by storm water that should be 
disposed of by sewers. 

The demand for relief from these evils is growing more urgent 
every year, and it is time that at least a system of disposal of house and 
surface drainage should be adopted. The outlet for this sewer must 
be located at some point on the Mystic River near the Middlesex 
Avenue Bridge, and when the Winthrop Avenue Sewer is extended, a 
common outlet should be provided for both sewers. 

The attention of the City Council is respectfully directed to pre- 



454 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

vious reports of the City Engineer, and the statements there presented 
and recommendations made are repeated. 

Tannery Brook District. 

The area bounded by Holland street, Boston & Maine Railroad 
(Arlington and Lexington branch), Cambridge city line, Alewife Brook 
and Broadway has a considerable population, but has no system of 
sewerage, except a small area drained by the Holland, Elmwood and 
Mead Street sewers, and except in the area last mentioned, the sewer- 
age from a population of about six hundred people is collected either 
in cesspools or is disposed of by a private sewer emptying into Tan- 
nery Brook. This private sewer was originally a part of the Tannery 
Brook, and since houses have been erected has been made a covered 
channel and used as a sewer. Surveys and plans have been made for 
a main sewer, which it is proposed to lay through the valley of this 
brook and connect with Metropolitan Sewer. 

Connections with the Metropolitan Sewer. 

The Metropolitan Sewer is so far completed that it will be necessary 
to make the several connections with the Metropolitan Sewer during 
the coming season. 

Six connections will be made, as follows : 

At Somervihe avenue and Poplar streets with the Somerville 
Avenue Sewer ; the drainage area of this sewer is bounded by East 
Cambridge city hne, Linwood and Medford streets, Highland avenue, 
Central street, Medford street, Broadway, Cedar street, Morrison 
avenue and Morrison street. Elm street, Broadway, Holland street? 
Meacham street and the Cambridge city line. 

Included within the area drained at this connection is a part of 
Cambridge draining into the sewer in Webster avenue, the establish- 
ment owned by the North Packing Company, John P. Squire Com- 
pany, and the New England Dressed Meat and Wool Company, and is 
the largest and most expensive of all the connections. 

Second — At Washington and Waverly streets. The drainage area 
of this sewer is bounded by the Boston city line. Crescent, Pearl and 
Cross streets, the Boston & Maine Railroad (Southern Division), 
and Washington street. 



i 



REPORT OF THE CITV ENGINEER. 455 

These two connections will be made with the Cambridge branch 
of the Metropolitan Sewer. 

Third — At North Union street. The drainage area of this sewer 
is bounded by the Boston city line, ISIystic avenue, Union, Benedict 
and Austin streets. 

Fourth — At Mystic and Winthrop avenues. The drainage area 
of this sewer is bounded by Mystic avenue, Austin, Benedict and 
Union streets, Broadway, Boston city line, Mt. Pleasant, Pearl and 
Cross streets, Boston & Maine Railroad (Southern Division), Cen- 
tral, Medford and Adams streets, Broadway, ^lain, Heath, Jaques 
and Temple streets, and Mystic avenue. 

■ Fifth — At Mystic avenue, at or near Moreland street, extended. 
The area to be drained by the sewer at this connection is bounded by 
Mystic avenue, Temple, Jaques, Heath and Main streets, and the ]sled- 
ford City line, and includes a small area in Medford. 

The three sewers last mentioned connect with the Somerville 
branch of the Metropolitan Sewer. 

Sixth — At the junction of Alewife and Tannery brooks. The 
area to be drained by the sewer at this connection has already been 
described in the description of the proposed sewer in the Tannery 
Brook District. The last-mentioned sewer will connect with the 
Alewife Brook branch of the Metropolitan Sewer. 

Table. 

In appendex A will be found a table showing the location, items of 
cost, cost per lineal foot, amount of assessments made, and the cost to 
the city of sewers built in 1894. 

In appendix H will be found an ordinance relating to the sewer 
department. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

The work of the Highway Department has been done under the 
direction of Mr. Thomas H. Eames, the Superintendent ; the City 
Engineer is only required to give lines and grades, make measurements 
of work done, and compute the assessments for sidewalk improvements. 

The following information has been compiled from the records of 
this office, information obtained from the Superintendent, and from the 
annual report of the Committee on Highways. 



456 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The items of expenditure are as follows : 

Credit. 

The appropriation for highways for 1894 was 
Collections for work of former years 
Net income, city dwellings. 
Health Department account. 
Building at gravel bank. 

Money approved in pay-roll not called for and decrease 
in value of tools, property and materials 

Debit. 

Laying out streets and advertising notices of hearings 
Construction of new streets .... 

Street crossings . . . . 

Street signs in place ...... 

Repairs and improvement of streets in connection with 

setting edgestone ..... 

Ordinary repairs of streets ..... 
General repairs of streets ..... 
Cleaning streets . . 

Planting and trimming trees .... 
Labor, laying brick and edgestone for single estates 
Repairs of brick sidewalks .... 

Salary of drawtend^r and repairs, Middlesex Avenue 

Bridge . - . 

Removing snow and ice from streets and sidewalks 
Sewer Assessment, Glen street .... 

Books, stationery and printing .... 

Setting stone bounds ..... 

Building at crusher ...... 

Laying out triangular lot, Broadway and Holland street 
Repairs, Boston Avenue Bridge .... 

Insurance and grading at city stable 

Opening new streets ...... 

Amount carried forward .... 



$60,000.00 



2,143.13 
$62,143.13 

% 173.00 

4,731.65 

1,021.65 

185.85 

5,928.40 
8,557.25 
10,201.27 
6,525.95 
532.20 
2,110.38 
3,138.75 

462.51 

3,814.38 

15.88 

70.00 

39.00 

269.63 

115.46 

190.37 

1,212.95 

44.16 

$49,340.69 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 457 

Amount brought f 01 ward . ; . . . 849,340.69 

Superintendent's salary ...... 1,600.00 

Board of horses ....... 417.17 

Superintendent's telephone ..... 2.95 

Cleaning Cross and Pearl streets, after the rebuilding of 

West End Street Railway tracks .... 1,643.35 

Private work not paid for in 1894 .... 457.05 

Sundry expenses ....... 125.19 

Net loss on tools, property and materials . . . 8,065.54 



The work done is itemized as follows : — 



Total cost of work done ..... 861,651.94 
Balance unexpended . . . . . . 491.19 



§62,143.13 
Edgestone and Brick Sidewalk. 

The appropriation for sidewalks was . . . S10,000.00 

Thirty-three sidewalks laid in 1804 (see Appendix B) 819,811.22 

Abatements ........ 31.67 

Books 26.00 



819,868.89 
Less assessments and receipts . . 9,905.65 



Cost to City 89,963.24 

Balance unexpended . . . 36.76 



810,000.00 



Sixteen thousand one hundred nineteen and three-tenths lineal feet 
of edgestone. Twelve thousand four hundred forty-one and four- 
tenths square yards of brick sidewalk. 

Repairs of Streets. 

The repairs made on the main streets were as follows : — 

Elm street from Willow avenue to Cedar street, Medford street 
from Somerville avenue to the Fitchburg Railroad, School street, 



458 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Berkeley street to SomervilJe avenue, Washington street, Fitchburg 
Railroad to Beacon street. 

Repairs and Improvement of Streets in Connection with Setting 

Edgestone. 

Edgestones were set on twenty-four streets. The cost of street 
repairs per lineal foot of edgestone set, including the cost of paving 
gutters with cobble stones, was $0.51 per lineal foot. The cost of 
paved gutters per lineal foot of edgestone was $0.34 ; per square yard 
was $1.07. 

Construction of Streets. 

The average cost per square yard of street macadamized in 1894 
was $0.27 (see Appendix C). 

Total Edgestone and Brick Sidewalk. 

December 31, 1894, there were in Somerville three hundred ten 
thousand eight hundred thirty-eight lineal feet, or fifty-nine miles of 
edgestone and two hundred seven thousand and ninety lineal feet or M 
thirty-nine and two-tenths miles of brick sidewalk. 

Tables. 

In Appendix B will be found a table showing the location and 
cost of edgestones, brick sidewalks and paved gutters, and of repairs 
on roadway in streets where edgestones were laid. 

In Appendix C will be found a table showing the location and cost 
of street improvements made during the year. 

In Appendix D will be found a table showing the length and width 
of streets accepted in 1894. 

In Appendix F will be found a table showing the location and 
length of public and private streets. 

Street Numbering. 

Street numbers on all houses in the city have been compared with 
the numbering plans, and all houses without numbers have been num- 
bered according to plans and at the city's expense. 



REPORT OF THE CIT\' EXGIXEER. 459 

PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

Nathan Tufts Park. 

Work on the completion of the Nathan Tufts Park was begun 
March 13th, and completed November 5th. The work done during 
the year comprised the completion of the parapet wall protecting the 
top of the ledge, the planting of trees and shrubs, crushing stone for 
the roads and walks, grading in the vicinity of the Powder House and 
at the foot of the ledge, the construction of roads and walks, paving 
gutters and seeding the areas not planted. 

The planting was made from a design by James H. Bowditch, of 
Boston, forester, and the trees and shrubs were furnished by him. 

The stone for the roads was collected from excavations within the 
park limits, and was broken in sizes convenient for crushing. 

The stone was broken on the park by a crusher erected by Arthur 
J. Wellington, Manager Gates Iron Works Company, of Boston. 

All other work was done by the City, by day labor. 

The plans of laying out and constructing roads, and all landscape 
work, except the planting previously mentioned, were made by the 
City Engineer. 

As the park is practically completed, it may not be out of place to 
allude to its natural beauties, and that there may be no possible 
chances for criticism of motives, the following quotations from an 
editorial in the Boston Herald, October 14, 1894, is made : — 

" A new pleasure ground of exceptional importance for an area of 
only a few acres, is the Nathan Tufts Park in Somerville, the improve- 
ment of which has just been completed. This importance is given by 
the historic associations, and the picturesque character of the central 
feature of the place, * * * the ancient powder tower that constitutes the 
most precious historic possession of Somerville. * * * * The city has 
the appreciative good sense to give it a setting worthy of its character 
and quite in keeping with it. The improvement of the place for park 
purposes has been in hand for something less than two years. * * * * 
The picturesqueness of the fine old tower, impressive in the stateliness 
of its admirable proportions, naturally calls for correspondingly pictur- 
esque surroundings. The piece of hilly ground, at whose summit the 
tower stands, contained the little that was picturesque in itself when 



460 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

taken in hand, having been a rather bare and bleak piece of old pasture. 
To give convenient access to the place, a fine drive has been carried 
up the hill by easy curves and gradients, making a circuit of the park. 
Pleasant walks have also been provided with stone steps, where slopes 
are steep. * * * * To make room for the drive, the rocky hillside has 
been blasted away, forming a steep cliff of rock that makes a most 
appropriate base for the old tower, when seen from the street. This 
ledge is capped by a parapet of rough work. * * * * 

A chief value of the park lies in the opportunity for breathing the 
fresh air from a hill-top, with very pleasant immediate surroundings." 

The amount expended on construction each year, and the cost of 
land are given below. 

Expended in 1892 $ 2,196.40 

Expended in 1893 . . . . . . . 13,466.33 

Expended in 1894 17,655.28 



Total cost of construction ^33,318.01 

Amount paid for land ...... 19,424.55 



Total cost of the park ...... ^52,742.56 

SOMERVILLE AvENUE CeMETERY. 

The report of the City Engineer for 1893 contained^some sugges- 
tions as to the need of further control of burials, and the need of 
making a record of locations of interments, the propriety of allowing 
burials t© be made in a closely populated district, and some method 
of ensuring the care of all the lots. As no action has been taken, I 
respectfully renew the suggestions embodied in the report of 1893. 

The items of expenditure on Public Grounds are as follows : — 

City Hall and Library Grounds. 

Labor, care of walks and grass . . $130.48 

Repairing driveways .... 5.00 

Plants 19.65 

Tree guards 18.00 

$173.13 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



461 



High School Grounds. 



Labor, care of walks and grass 
Repairing driveways 



§90.23 
5.63 



895.86 



Central Hill. 

Labor, care of walks and grass 
Horse hire ..... 
Removing snow and ice from walks. 
Seed and dressing 

Sod and labor .... 

Repairing and painting seats . 
Repairing and painting fences . 
Repairing and painting steps, Medford 

street entrance 
Repairing catch-basins 
Tools, property, oil and repairs 
Plants 



Broadway Park 

Labor, care of walks and grass 

Horse hire .... 

Labor, care of ice for skating . 

Police service 

Raising and lowering flagstaff 

Repairing and painting flagstaff 

Loam, grass seed and dressing 

Plants ..... 

New seats .... 

Tools, property, oil, repairs and sundries 



8534.11 

10.75 

322.27 

168.54 
47.78 
37.99 
59.74 

43.42 

2.41 

40.55 

38.17 



8977.26 
41.25 
18.25 
301.50 
20.00 
17.71 
17.45 
89.15 
63.00 
61.23 



Sl,305.73 



$1,606.80 



Broadway Parkw 



Labor, care of grass 

Horse hire 

Reseeding railway location 

Loam, seed and dressing 

Repairing fence 

Trees and labor of planting 

Three water services 

Use of water 

(29) 



AY. 



8187.75 
6.50 
69.38 
29.08 
38.50 
55.00 
54.70 
15.00 



8455.91 



462 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SOMERVILLE x\VENUE CeMETERY. 



Care of walks and grass 


$211.89 


Plants .... 


3.53 


Loam, sod and dressing 


15.72 


Tools and sundries 


4.17 


Water service . . . , 


16.60 


Use of water 


5.00 



$256.91 



Nathan Tufts Park. 



Labor, care of grass and walks . 


$580.82 


Repairs of roof of Powder House 


23.36 


Flagstaff, halliards, ball, etc. 


42.75 


Fences ..... 


32.68 


Signs 


2.00 


Tools, property and repairs 


91.19 


Water service .... 


9.80 


Use of water .... 


15.00 


Expressing .... 


2.00 



Total . 



$799.60 
$4,705.94 



BRIDGES. 



Bridges over the Boston 6^ Maine Railroad, Southern Division, 

Washington, Cross, Central and Cedar Street, and Broadway bridges 
are all iron bridges of modern construction, and are in excellent con- 
dition. 

Walnut Street Bridge. 

Has been removed, and an iron bridge is under construction. 

School Street Bridge. 

The abutments appear to be in the same condition as in 1893 ; the 
southerly abutment is somewhat out of line at the base, but appears to 
be safe. The easterly sidewalk approaches, supported on posts, need 
some repairs. 



report of the city engineer. 463 

Sycamore Street Bridge. 

The approaches and bridge are in good condition. The surface 
drainage should be diverted into the railroad ditches, and not be 
allowed to run through the abutments. 

Bridges over the Fitchbiirg Railroad. 

Prospect Street Bridge. 

The bridge and approaches are in good condition, the northerly 
abutment should be rebuilt at once. 

Washington Street Bridge. 

The bridge is in good condition, except that the iron work needs 
painting. 

Beacon Street Bridge. 

Is in same condition as in 1893. 

Miscellaneous Bridges. 

Broadway Bridge Over Alewife Brook. 

The retaining walls need pointing. The surface drainage should 
be collected in catch-basins ; at present it runs over and through the 
retaining wall and the arch, and may cause damage to the masonry. 

Boston Avenue Bridge. 

The surface drainage should be collected and disposed of by catch- 
basins. The southerly abutment is in an unsatisfactory condition ; 
the ends of the floor stringers, where they rest on the masonry, are con- 
siderably decayed and must soon be replaced. When it becomes 
necessary to replace the stringers, the southerly abutment should be 
moved northerly to the location of the southerly pier, and an iron bridge 
built to replace the present one. 

Middlesex Avenue Bridge. 

This bridge was built about twenty-five years ago, and was probably 
sufficiently strong for the purpose for which it was designed. The 



464 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

condition of the bridge is such that it will probably be necessary that 
very extensive repairs be made during the coming year, and should an 
electric street railway be built through Middlesex avenue, it will prob- 
ably be necessary that the bridge and draw be rebuilt. 

The planking on the sidewalk and the easterly draw pier should be 
relaid, the faces of the channel way be replanked, and the fences be 
repaired if it should be decided not to rebuild the coming season. 

WATER WORKS. 

Lines and grades have been given when called for ; all mains, gates, 
hydrants and services have been located, and the locations recorded 
in the usual manner. 

The diameters of mains relaid are considerably larger than those 
heretofore used. The benefit of these changes is noticed in the in- 
creased pressure in different parts of the city. 

HORACE L. EATON, 

City Engmeer. 



APPENDIX A. 

TABULAR STATEMENT OF SEWERS BUILT IN 1894. 



LOCATION. 


[TEMS OF COST. 






To. 


Co„_. 


C 


i 

I 
J 


1 
1 

s 

E 


1 


1 


' 


6 


i 


Co.?^'rS"io.. 


1 


1 
1 


1 






Earth. 


Roek. 


1.- 


i 


} 


! 


1 






1 


ll 


1^ 

••3 


i 






Avon .tree, ... 


Timothy F. Crinimilig* 
mil.T.] D. Bryne , . 

WiUatd B. Bryne . . 
Timotliy F. Criminingt 
Dennis C. Collini . . 
Richard Falvey . . . 

Chatlci A. MoDgan . 
Charlci A. Mongan . 

ChariM A. Mongan . 
WilUrd B. Bryne . . 

Charles A. Mongon . 
Timolhy F. CrimmingB 


! 


lii 


Hard-par.. 

Hnid-pao. 

Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan, 
Hntd-pati. 

Hard"psn. 
Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 

Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 


1 


ffrii 




.SSK 


"•r 


:: 


:: 


1 




(A) .00 
(A) .01 

(A) .OS 


52.17 
.37 

.87 


'^,140.sfi 
IM.M 


1 21 








! 


I 




CliyFamlud, . 

Congra. place . , 
Cm.. Slreel plate. 




1 tl 1 Mdleet 




A point m lee. northeart Irom 8er»iel. .treet . 


Westerly /. . . . 
Woeterly 

NS?Liiert^;veoui ! 
France.ca avenue . . 

Near Libirly avenue 

Neat Bro»d*av . . . 

Weilerly 

Konheasieily . . . 

Wcjierlr .... 

NoriheaiteilyOaOleel, 

Highland avenue . . 
KorthwMletly . . . 

South wciterly ■ . ■ 

NcStChn^ilre«: '. 
Southwealedy . . . 




Co. .Ire 1 


« 


F t ■ 


U M 


H.ll....«e 


A point 830 le.te..tl,o» El., .treet . . . . 










'"r"""""' 


iia: ::;;::;;:;;; 


> ••""■" 








Jenny Lind avenue 


Ap.in,™,.etn.rthe..t„.»Med,.rd.tre.t. 


"■" 


Inland 


W h- 1 


-5 


Melvin ..... 


A point 37a rcet joulhwut from Broadway . . 


;- 


pirz"" : 


A'^oinTB30r«t(romB"*dw«y ::'.'.'.'. 


.56 








Sawyer avenue 
HiEhland avenue 


A point no ket southwut from Highlaiid nvenuc 


.53 




176 r 


3 


C^ 1 1 


10 03 




Wll 


















Hard-pan. 




1. 


. 


. 


iz 


.15 




0! 


',.,:« 


.: 


^.. 


::: 




Wh 1 


p- t 


SOW 










Total length an 


d..,t.,ne...e..r.hui,tinlS..« . . . 








IO».tl 
































„.,™.84 


„=.™.05 


,.,««,.!9 



SEWERS CONTRACTED FOR IN i8 



AND UNCOMPLETED DECEMBER 31, 1894, FOR WHICH NO ASSESSMENTS 
HAVE BEEN MADE. 



.a„.ovS„.„. 


..„..„ 


TO. 




CO. 


— 




Si.ei.inoh... 


l^n'ItTi'r. 


M.,e..l.. 


Dee'elTal,™. 




No th Unio 


street se 


—"i«» 


Spring 
A poin 


,;.i.„.tre.t. 


orlheasterly 


My. 




Denni. F. O'Co 


r 






18 and 80 


E 


AkZpipe 


5291.74 






andDe. 


i,C Colli... . 




UnionStree 


andMy.0 




on Mystic a 


enue, near Au.t,n .treet 


hU„..n.tr.et . 






=o,ttoth. 


City 0, ...... butlt,. IS., 






















S.S3.99 


Total 


83 3H33 
























APPENDIX B. 

Table showing the Location and Cost of Edgestone and Brick Sidewalks, of Paved Gutters and Roadway constructed in Streets where Edge- 
stone was laid. 









F.O.. 


TO. 






hU,..,.,.. 


P„„0„^.s. 


Gaavtt,.. 


h..c„.„. 


STREET. 


S,OB. 


StPttwa... 


Ed|=rtone.. 


Sq.Y.td,. 


Co.t. 


S,.vard.. 


Co.t. 


S,. yard.. 


Co.t. 


Sq. V.rd.. 


CO... 


Beacon 

Beacon 

Beacon and 

Kent 

Berkeley 

Billingham 

Broadway 

Broadway 

Central 

Cherry 

Dickinson 

Elm 

Elm 

Eflscx 

Flint 

Gibbens 

Hathotn 

Heath 

Highland avenue . . 
Highland avenue . . 

Lake 

Mcdford 

Medford 

Munroe 

Munroe 

Porter 

sL-avinio: ; ; 

School 

Walnut 

Wallace 

Webster avenue . . . 


Northeasterly . 
Northeasterly 
Northeasterly 
Easterly . . . 
Northerly . . . 
Northwesterly . 
Southerly . . . 
Southerly . . . 
Westerly . . . 
Easterly . . . 
Southeasterly . 
Southwesterly . 
Northwesterly . 
Both .... 
Northeasterly . 
Southerly . . . 
Westerly . . . 
Northeasterly 
Northerly . . . 
Southerly . . . 
Southerly . . . 
South westerly . 
Southwesterly ■ 
Northerly . . . 
Southerly . . . 
South and West . 

Westerly '. '. '. 
Southerly . . . 
Westerly . . . 
Westerly . . . 
Westerly . , . 
Easterly . . . 
Westerly . . . 




Concord avenue 

Kent street 

Easterly line Durell school lot 

School street '.'.'.'.'.'. 
Broadway 

Highland avenue .'.;;; 

Summer street 

Beacon street 

Russell street 

Summit street 

Medford street 

Cross street 

Central street 

Broadway 

Central street 

Hawkins street 

Central street 

School street 

Walnut street 

Walnut street 

School street 

Summer street 

Summer street 

Somerville avenue .... 

Evergreen avenue .... 
Beach avenue 


Miller Street ..'....'. 

Kent street 

Northerly line Durell school lot 

Central street 

William street 

Near Cross street ..... 

Near Arthur street 

Boston & Maine Railroad . . 

Springfield street '.'..'.'. 
Davis square 

Richdale avenue ! '.'.'.'.'. 

Aldrich street 

Benton avenue 

Arlington street 

Bondstrcel 

Westerly line Central Club Ass'n 
Westerly line Est, Johnson heirs 
South Church street .... 

Bartlett street 

Lee street 

Southeasterly line Wentwortli Est. 
Estate of Mary Jones .... 

Summer street 

Highland avenue 

Highland avenue 

Sycamore street 

Broadway 

Broadway 


6 
6 
10 
10 

6 

IC 


10 

00 
00 
00 
67 
67 
00 
00 
67 
67 
67 
67 

10 
IS 


1.087.0 

602.6 
U3.3 

622.2 
604.7 
737.0 
237.0 

4oV.2 

327 8 
1.042.3 

869.8 
647.8 

sVV.ii 

366.3 
1,674.3 

884.0 


447.1 

302^0 
lOfi.O 
502.9 
466.0 
399.1 

889.7 
224.0 

604.7 
333.7 

692.0 
290.6 
269.7 
689.4 

oV-'.i 

671.0 


i 384.36 
780.69 

'926!2G 

eu'.ss 

947.43 
767.79 
498.89 
972.38 
236.85 
339.62 

336.86 

628.36 
569.64 
610.12 
672.63 
1,732.14 
1,096 60 
668.65 
661.65 
667.05 
227.70 
849.10 
437.011 


362 

48 

'174 
168 
246 
79 

'iei 

109 
847 

287 
216 

'iJ6 
122 

'295 

"ei 

148 


S 303.90 

67 jo 

ISV.M 
140 00 
247.60 
62.80 

iVi'.oo 

80.io 
464.20 
36.20 

2'73'.96 
212.30 

104.95 
166.60 

264" 10 
j. 461.66 


2,121' 


S378.'70 


1,311 
1,111 

2,392 
} ■-■ 

400 


S260. 

si.'s 

108.' 
279.8 

241.- 




6 















11,432.0 


10,899.4 


119,811.22 


3,739 


{8,992.80 


2,121 


J378.70 


7.272 



















APPENDIX A. 

TABULAR STATEMENT OF SEWERS BUILT IN 1894. 



City Farm lands 

Congress place . 
Cross Street place 
Glen 



Hall! 
Private lands 



Kidder avenue 

and 
Private lands 

Jenny Lind aven 

Laurel aven 

Leland . . 

Melvin . . 

North Unioi 

Passageway 

Pearl . . 

Pearl Street place 

Private lands 

Talbot avenue 



Snow terrace 
Summer . 
Summer 

Sy. 
Wheelei 



Linwood street 

Cross street 

Fountain avenue 

A point 330 feet east from Elm street . . 

Private lands 

Hall avenue 

Private lands 

Private lands 

Private lands 

Private lands 

Francesca avenue 

A point 313 feet northeast from Medford strt 

Laurel street 

Washington street 

A point 273 feet southwest from Broadway 

A point 65 feet south from Mousal place . 

Northeast of No. 65 Newbury street . . 

Franklin street 

Pearl street 



Broadway (opp. Wallace street) 
A point 930 feet from Broadway 

Private lands 

Private lands 

Talbot avenue 

Packard avenue 



Jaques £ 
Cedar st 



Medford stn 
Pinckney sti 



Near Benton avenue 

Northeasterly 466 feet 
Westerly ... 

Southwesterly . 

Westerly . . . 

Near Oliver street 

Private lands . . . 
Near Liberty avenue 
Francesca avenue 
Liberty avenue . 
Northwesterly . 
Northwesterly . - 
Near Liberty avenue 
Kidder avenue . 

Near Broadway . 

Westerly . . . 

Northeasterly 

Southwesterly . 

Southwesterly . 

Westerly . . . 

Westerly . . . 

Northeasterly . 

Northeasterly 030 
Talbot avenue . 
College avenue . 
Packard avenue . 

Near Curtis street 



Southwesterly 
Near Linden av 



uthwesterly 
•at Mt. Verne 



Charles A. Mongan 



Willard B. Bryne . 

Charles A. Mongan 

Willard B, Bryne . 

Timothy F. Crimming: 

and 
Dennis C. Collins , 
Richard Falvey . . 



Ma 



: Buttimer 



Charles A. Mongan 
Maurice Buttimer . 
Charles A. Mongan 
Maurice Buttimer . 
Charles A. Mongan 
Crimmings & Collins 
Charles A. Mongan 
Willard B. Bryne . 

Charles A. Mongan 
Maurice Buttimer . 
Richard Falvey . . 

Charles A. Mongan 
Maurice Buttimer . 
Charles A. Mongan 



Hervey A. Hanscom 
Charles A. Mongan 



ITEMS OF COST. 



116.6 

1M.8 

153.1 

344.6 
212.1 
234.6 
276.0 
206.3 
234.7 
163.4 
226.0 



100.7 
170.5 



Hard-pan. 



Sand! 
Sand.' 



Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 

Sand. 
Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 

Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 

Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 

Hard-pan. 

Hard-pan. 

Hard-pan. 
Hard-pan. 

Hard-pan. 



72.6 
97.1 

105.9 
24.2 
22.1 

114.2 
67.7 
40.2 



259.8 
22.0 

313.3 
76.0 



Earth. Rock. 



Bould'r 
Bould'l 



3.60 
3.50 
3.60 
3.50 

4.60 

3.50 



.62.00 
6.00 
1.00 

30.00 

48.00 
48.00 

44.50 
47.00 



5.00 
35.00 



35.00 
42.00 
42.00 
40.00 



7.00 
45.00 
47.00 

2.50 
38.00 
6.00 



(A). 
(A). 
1(B). 



(A) .05 
(A) .06 



COST AND ASSESSMENT. 



$2.17 
I 1.14 



2.71 
1.72 



669.21 

66.71 
46.69 
108.. 62 

2,140.85 

826.58 

1,497.46 

312.31 

311.98 

219.12 

57.74 

301.72 

70.93 

97.97 

122.34 

1,138.03 

782.86 

1,764.51 

1,844.91 



191.09 
263.28 
915.58 
140.16 



8.63.05 
659.21 

45.24 
23.98 

1,184.82 
962.84 
872.45 

287.60 
68.93 

218.39 
66.38 

176.77 
70.93 
97.97 

121.78 

1,917.56 



14.42 
252.26 



24.81 
263.05 



176.67 
10.02 



Total length and cost of r 



$13,799.06 $2,960.39 



(A) Removing surplu 



CB) Test pits for location of rock. 



fC) Advertising. 



(D) Filling on line of s 



SEWERS CONTRACTED FOR IN 1894, AND UNCOMPLETED DECEMBER 31, 1894, FOR WHICH NO ASSESSMENTS 

HAVE BEEN MADE. 



Name of Street. 


Fro.y. 


To. 


Contractor. 


Size in inches. 


Approximate 
Length in feet. 


Materials. 


Payments to 
December 31, 1894. 




North Union Street sewer e.\tension 


North Union street, northeasterly 


Mystic river 

Westerly 

North Union street . . 




18 and 20 
10 
12 


376.0 
100.0 
400.0 


frrip'p^ 

Akron pipe 
Akron pipe 


$291.74 
64.25 

2S.00 






Timothy F. Crimmings and Dennis C. Collins . . 




Union Street and Mystic Avenue sewer extension 


-A point on Mystic avenue, near Austin street 












$383.99 


Total cost to the City of sewers built in 1894 




$3,344.38 







i built in the city January 1, 1S95 



APPENDIX B. 

Table showing the Location and Cost of Edgestone and Brick Sidewalks, of Paved Gutters and Roadway constructed in Streets where Edge- 
stone was laid. 



Beacon . . . . 
Beacon . . . . 
Beacon and 

Kent . . . . 
Berkeley . . . 
Billingham . . . 
Broadway . . . 
Broadway . . . 
Central . . . . 
Cherry . . . . 
Dickinson . . . 

Elm 

Elm 

Essex . . . . 

Flint 

Gibbens . . . . 
Hathorn . . . 
Heath . . . . 
Highland avenue 
Highland avenue 

Lake 

Medford . . . 
Medford . . . 
Munroe . . . . 
Munroe . . . . 
Preston . . . . 
Porter . . . . 
Putnam . . . . 
Quincy . . . . 
Richdale avenue . 
School . . . . 
Walnut . . . , 
Wallace . . . . 
Webster avenue . 



Northeasterly 
Northeasterly 
Northeasterly 
Easterly . . 
Northerly . . 
Northwesterly 
Southerly . . 
Southerly . . 
Westerly . . 
Easterly . . 
Southeasterly 
Southwesterly 
Northwesterly 
Both . . . 
Northeasterly 
Southerly . . 
Westerly . . 
Northeasterly 
Northerly . . 
Southerly . . 
Southerly . . 
Southwesterly 
Southwesterly 
Northerly . . 
Southerly . . 
South and West 
Both . . . 
Westerly . . 
Westerly . . 
Southerly . . 
Westerly . . 
Westerly . . 
Westerly . . 
Easterly . . 
Westerly . . 



Concord avenue 

Kent street 

Easterly line Durell school lot 

Beacon street 

School street 

Broadway 

Rush street 

Cross street 

Highland avenue 

Summer street 

Beacon street 

Russell street 

Summit street 

Medford street 

Cross street 

Central street 

Broadway 

Temple street 

Central street 

Putnam street 

Hawkins street 

Central street 

School street 

Walnut street 

Walnut street 

School street 

Summer street 

Summer street 

Somerville avenue .... 

School street 

Evergreen avenue .... 

Pearl street 

Holland street 

Beach avenue 

Treraont street 



Dickinson street 

Miller street 

Kent street 

Northerly line Durell school lot 

Central street 

William street 

Near Cross street 

Near Arthur street 

Boston & Maine Railroad . . 

Highland avenue 

Springfield street 

Davis square 

Kenwood street 

Richdale avenue 

Aldrich street 

Benton avenue 

Arlington street 

Bond street 

Westerly line Central Club Ass'n 
Westerly line Est. Johnson heirs 
South Church street .... 

Bartlett street 

Lee street 

Southeasterly line Wentworth Est. 
Estate of Mary Jones .... 

Summer street 

Highland avenue 

Highland avenue 

Summer street 

Sycamore street 

Broadway 

Veazie street 

Broadway 

Webster school lot 

Cambridge line 



6.67 
11.00 
11.00 

4.17 

6.67 

6.67 
15.00 
15.00 

9.00 

6.67 

6.67 
10.00 
10.00 

6.67 

6.67 

6.67 

6.67 

6.67 
10.00 
10.00 

6.67 

9.17 

8.33 
10 to 6.67 

6.67 

6.67 

6.67 

8 33 

6.67 

6.67 

8.33 

6.67 

6.67 

8.25 



1,087.0 
128.3 
87.4 

592.6 
143.3 

522.2 
504.7 
737.0 
237.0 

494.2 



327 8 

1,042.3 

92.1 

859.8 
647.8 

377.9 
366.3 



182.7 
443.3 



917.2 
392.0 
195.0 
502.9 
455.0 
399.1 

889.7 
224.0 

504.7 
333.7 



75.0 
117.0 



592.0 
290.5 
259.7 
589.4 

947.1 
571.0 

594.0 
190.4 
912.9 



384.35 
780.59 

176.68 

1,026.65 
926.26 
364.62 
604.68 
947.43 
757.79 
498.89 
972.38 
236.85 
339.52 
515.35 
336.85 
256.69 
909.37 
170.05 
138.25 
614.67 
446 91 
628.35 
569.54 
516.12 
572.63 
1,782.14 
1,036 50 
558.55 
661.65 
567.05 
227.70 
849.10 

437.06 



i?19,811.22 



Paved Gutters. 



Sq. Yards. Cost, 



174 
168 
246 



109 
347 
31 

287 
216 

126 
122 



3,739 



226.95 

57.70 

134.20 
140 00 
247.60 
52.80 

176.00 



80.10 
454.20 
36.20 

273.95 
212.30 

104.95 
166.50 



;?3,992.30 



Sq. Yards. Cost 



2,121 



2,392 
666 



S260, 
448 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



465 



APPENDIX C. 



TABLE SHOWIXG LOCATION AND COST OF 

MEXTS. 



STREET IMPROVE- 



Name of Street. 


Macadam. 


Sq. Yards. 


Cost. 


Broadway (at Boston & Lowell R. R. Bridge) 
Claremon (Holland street to Mead street) . 
Cross (Broadway to Mystic avenue) 
Cross (Broadway to Oilman street) 
Elm (at Nathan Tufts Park) .... 
Elm (Willow avenue to Cedar street) . . . ' 
Gorham (Holland street to Howard street) 
Greenville (Medford street to High street) . 
Hall avenue (Elm street to Liberty avenue) 
Hudson (Cedar street to Lowell street) 
Jenny Lind ave. (Medford street to Broadway) 
Medford (Somerville ave. to Washington street) 
Pearl (Cross street to Oilman square) . 
School (Berkeley street to Somerville avenue) 
Washington (Fitchburg R. R. to Beacon street) . 
York terrace (Central street to Harvard place) 


2,000 
1,555 
3,055 
3,400 
1,000 
5,500 
2,100 
1,830 
2,570 
3,600 
1,700 
2,900 
9,500 
3,070 
7,000 
750 


$ 374.55 
399.40 
811.20 
540.00 
145.05 

1,740.60 
197.80 
427.35 
510.70 
504.65 
503.30 

1,649.45 

1,103.35 
765.80 

3,923.60 
275.00 


Totals . . ..... 


51,460 


813,871.50 



466 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



APPENDIX D. 



STREETS ACCEPTED IN 1894. 



Name of Street. 


From. 


To. 


Width in 
Feet. 


Length in 
Feet. 


Bartlett .... 


Vernon st. . . 


Medford st. . 


40 


820 


Bigelow . . . 






Boston St. . . 


Munroe st. . 


50 


208 


Claremon . 






Holland st. . . 


Mead st. 


40 


560 


Cutter ave. 






Highland ave. . 


Summer st. . 


40 


480 


Cypress . . . 






Central st. . . 


Beach st. 


40 


262 


Delaware . . 






Pearl st. . . . 


Aldrich st. . 


40 


451 


Fanning ave. . 






Highland ave. . 


Lexington ave. 


50 


376 


Hall ave. . . 






Elm St. . . . 


Liberty ave. 


40 


926 


Hancock 






Elm St. . . . 


Summer st. . . 


40 


781 


Knapp . . 






School St. . . 


Granite st. . 


40 


379 


Leon . . 






Concord ave. 


Dickinson st. 


40 


155 


Lowell . . 






Medford st. . . 


Vernon st. . . 


40 


1,U1 


Munroe . 






Walnut St. . . 


Easterly . . . 


40 


375 


Porter . . 






Highland ave. . 


Summer st. . . 


40 and 45 


805 


Robinson . 






Central st. 


Bartlett st. . . 


40 


582 


Trull . . . 






Medford st. . 


Vernon st. . 


40 


1,050 


Waldo . . 






Highland ave. . 


Hudson St. . 


40 


287 


Warwick 






Cedar st. . . 


Warwick ave. . 


40 


665 


Westwood road 




Central st. . . 


Benton ave. 


40 


487 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



467 



APPENDIX F. 

TABLE SHOWING THE LOCATION, LENGTH AND WIDTH OF PUBLIC 

AND PRIVATE STREETS. 









Public 
or 


Width 
in 


Length. 


Street. 


From. 


To, 


Private. 


Feet, 


Public. 


Private, 


Adams 


Broadway 


Medford st. 


Public. 


40 


900 




Adrian 


Marion st. 


Joseph St. 


Private. 


40 




'530 


Albion place 


Albion St. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


10 




80 


Albion 


Central st. 


Cedar st. 


Public. 


40 


2,742 




Albion 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


50 




100 


*Albro 


Hoiks st. 


Southwesterly 


Private, 


30 




410 


Aldersey 


Walnut St. 


Vinal ave. 


Public. 


40 


508 




Aldrich 


Pearl st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Public, 


40 


611 


, . 


Alfred 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


50 




50 


Allen 


Somerville ave. 


Charlestown st. 


Private. 


•25 




680 


Allen ct. 


Park St. 


Northwesteily 


Private. 


20 




150 


Alpine 


Cedar st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


30 




670 


Alston 


Cross St. 


Shawmut pi. 


Private, 


40 




420 


Ames 


Bartlett st. 


Robinson st. 


Public, 


40 


580 




Appleton 


Willow ave. 


Clifton St. 


Public. 


40 


510 




Appleton 


Clifton St. 


Liberty ave. 


Private. 


40 




120 


Arlington 


Franklin st. 


Lincoln st. 


Public. 


40 


'440 


, . 


Arnold ct. 


Beacon st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


10 




115 


Arthur ct. 


Linden st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


about 10 




100 


Arthur 


Broadway 


Bonair st. 


Public. 


40 


*438 




Ashland 


Summer st. 


Sartwell ave. 


Private. 


30 




'470 


Asylum ave. 


Washington st. 


McLean Asylum 


Private. 


about 30 




2,000 


Atherton 


Central st. 


Beech st. 


Private. 


40 




264 


Auburn ave. 


Cross St. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private, 


30 




600 


Austin 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


40 


'eso 




Autumn 


Broadway 


Bonair st. 


Private. 


20 




420 


Avon 


School St. 


Central st. 


Private. 


40 




1,360 


Avon place 


Cross St. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


25 




150 


Ayer ave. 


Morrison ave. 


Boston ave. 


Private, 


70 




1.500 


Banks 


Elm st. 


Summer st. 


Private. 


40 




639 


Bartlett 


Vernon st. 


Medford st. 


Public. 


40 


*820 


, , 


Bartlett 


Medford st. 


Broadway 


Private, 


40 




730 


Bartlett 


Washington st. 


Asylum Grounds. 


Private. 


20 




200 


Bay State ave. 


Broadway 


Fosket St. 


Private, 


40 


• • 


1,197 


Beach ave. 


Webster ave. 


Columbia st. 


Private, 


about 20 


.. 


200 


Beacon place 


Beacon St. 


Northeasterly 


Private, 


15 




200 


Beacon 


Cambridge line 


Somerville ave. 


Public. 


66 


e'joo 


, , 


Beacon terrace 


Somerville ave. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


24 




110 


Bean's ct. 


Cutter St. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


16 




100 


Bedford 


South St. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


30 


.. 


160 


Beech 


Somerville ave. 


Spring St. 


Public. 


40 


800 


, , 


Bellevue terrace 


Albion St. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


20 




90 


Belmont 


Somerville ave. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


40 


2",i75 




Belmont place 


Belmont st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


25 




175 


Benedict ave. 


Broadway 


Benedict st. 


Private. 


20 




200 


Benedict 


Union st. 


Austin St. 


Public. 


40 


'eoo 




Bennett ct. 


Bennett st. 


Prospect St. 


Private. 


10 




100 


Bennett 


Prospect St. 


Bennett ct. 


Private. 


40 to 25 




400 


Benton ave. 


Summer st. 


Hudson St. 


Private. 


40 




1,210 


Berkeley 


School st. 


Central st. 


Public. 


40 


1,360 




Berwick 


Lawrence st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 




170 


Bigelow 


Boston St. 


High St. 


Public. 


50 


'2O8 




Billingham 


Broadway 


William st. 


Public. 


40 


563 




Bishop's place 


Glen St. 


Easterly 


Private. 


10 




75 


Blakeley ave. 


Winthrop ave. 


Cross St. 


Private, 


40 




630 


Bleachery ct. 


Somerville ave. 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Private, 


30 


. , 


450 


Bolton 


Oak st. 


Houghton St. 


Private. 


40 


•• 


500 



Proposed. 



468 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 
APPENDIX F.— Continued. 





From. 




Public 
or 


Width 
in 


Length, 


Street. 


To. 


Private. 


Feet. 
















PubHc. 


Private. 


Bonair 


Cross St. 


Walnut St. 


Public. 


40 


1,470 




Bond 


Broadway 


Jaques st. 


Public. 


40 


640 




Bonner ave. 


Washington st. 


Columbus ave. 


Public. 


40 


450 




Boston ave. 


Medford line 


Mystic River 


Public. 


60 


910 




*Boston ave. 


Cedar st. 


Medford line 


Private. 


50 


, , 


1*200 


Boston 


Washington st. 


Prospect Hill ave. 


Public. 


45 


630 




Boston 


Prospect Hill ave. 


Walnut St. 


Public. 


40 


1,250 




Bow 


Union sq. 


Wesley sq. 


Public. 


60 


600 




Bow 


Wesley pk. 


Somerville ave. 


Public. 


50 


500 


, , 


Bowdoin 


Washington st. 


Southerly 


Private. 


40 


, . 


370 


Bow St. place 


Bow St. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


40 




300 


Bradford ave. 


School St. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


40 




150 


Bradley 


Pearl st. 


Walter st. 


Private. 


40 




765 


Brastow ave. 


Lowell St. 


Porter st. 


Public. 


40 


686 


, 




Broadway 


Charlestown line 


Cross St. 


Public. 


100 


2,590 


, 




Broadway 


Cross St. 


Marshall st. 


Public, 


100 to 200 


2,060 






Broadway 


Marshall st. 


Main st. 


Public. 


100 


1,570 






Broadway 


Main st. 


Top of hill 


Public. 


100 to 90 


1,030 


, 




Broadway 


Top ot hill 


Albion St. 


PubUc. 


90 


2,540 






Broadway 


Albion St. 


Willow ave. 


Public. 


90 to 70 


1,030 






Broadway 


Willow ave. 


Paulina st. 


PubHc. 


70 


3,250 






Broadway 


Paulina st. 


Arlington line 


Public. 


65 


3,220 






Broadway place 


Broadway 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


22 




'250 


Brook 


Glen St. 


Cross St. 


Public. 


40 


*500 




Brook 


Dover st. 


Northerly 


Private. 


40 




200 


Browning road 


Sycamore st. 


Central st. 


Private. 


40 




679 


Buckingham 


Beacon st. 


Dimick st. 


Public. 


40 


*300 




Burnside ave. 


Elm St. 


Summer st. 


Private. 


40 


•• 


'720 


Caldwell place 


Washmgton st. 


Southerly 


Private. 


20 


.. 


210 


Calvin 


Beacon st. 


Dimick st. 


Private. 


40 , 




250 


Calvin 


Dimick st. 


Washington st. 


Private. 


30 




395 


Cambria 


Central st. 


Benton ave. 


Private. 


40 




488 


Cameron ave. 


Holland st. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


60 




1,000 


Campbell pk. 


Meacham st. 


Kingston st. 


Private. 


40 




395 


Campbell pk. place 


Kingston st. 


Arlington Br. R. 


Private. 


20 




84 


Carlton 


Somerville ave. 


Lake st. 


Public. 


40 


'300 




Carver 


Porter st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


40 




156 


Cedar 


Elm St. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


4,150 




Cedar ave. 


Cedar st. 


Linden ave. 


Private. 


22 




"290 


Cedar st. place 


Murdock st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 




220 


Central 


Somerville ave. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


33 


1,150 




Central 


Summer st. 


Medford st. 


Public. 


40 


2,480 




Central 


Medford st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


45 


1,070 




Centre 


Albion St. 


B. & L. R. R, 


Private. 


35 




200 


Chandler 


Park ave. 


Broadway 


PubHc. 


40 


1*232 




Chapel 


Elm St. 


Chandler st. 


Public. 


40 


273 


.. 


Chapel ct. 


Sycamore st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


12 




130 


Charles 


Washington st. 


Asylum Grounds. 


Private. 


30 




200 


Charlestown 


Allen St. 


Easterly 


Private. 


15 




400 


Charnwood road 


Willow ave. 


Gordonia road 


Private. 


40 




588 


Chauncy ave. 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


PubHc. 


50 


1,320 




*Chelsea 


Mystic ave. 


Melrose st. 


Private. 


50 




1*390 


Cherry 


Elm St. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


45 


1,450 




Chester 


Elm St. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


850 




Chester ave. 


Medford st. 


Angle 


Public. 


about 22 


220 




Chester ave. 


Angle 


Cross St. 


Private. 


20 




*445 


Chester place 


Chester st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


40 




200 


Chestnut 


Poplar St. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


40 




540 


Church 


Summer st. 


Somerville ave. 


Public. 


40 


560 




Church (south) 


Somerville ave. 


Lake st. 


PubHc. 


40 


340 


.. 


Church St. place 


Church St. (south) 


Northwesterly 


Private, 


25 




170 


Claremon 


Holland st. 


Mead st. 


Public. 


40 


'56O 


' • 



* Proposed. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 
APPENDIX Y.— Continued. 



469 





From. 


To. 


Public 

or 
Private. 


Width 

in 
Feet. 


Length. 


Street. 
















Pubhc. 


Private. 


Clarendon ave. 


Broadway 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


40 




1,210 


Clark 


Newton st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


3.0 




450 


Clifton 


Appleton St. 


Morrison st. 


Public. 


40 


240 




Clifton 


Morrison st. 


Arlington Br. R. 


Private. 


40 




220 


Clyde 


Cedar st. 


Murdock st. 


Private. 


.30 




600 


College ave. 


Broadway 


Medford line. 


Public. 


.50 


1,700 




Columbia 


Glass House ct. 


Cambridge line. 


Private. 


40 




550 


Columbia ct. 


Columbia st. 


Webster ave. 


Private. 


9 




150 


Columbus ave. 


Land of Clark 


Walnut St. 


Public. 


40 


1,000 




Columbus ct. 


Washington st. 


Northerly 


Private. 


.30 




100 


Conpord ave. 


Prospect St. 


Leon St. 


Public. 


40 


1,.500 




Concord ave. 


Leon St. 


Beacon st. 


Private. 


.30 




470 


Congress place 


Linwood st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


16 




200 


Conlon ct. 


Columbia st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


20 




200 


Conwell 


Highland ave. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


35 




360 


Conwell ave. 


Curtis St. 


Westerly 


Private. 


40 




600 


Cook 


Marion st. 


W. ofSo.Wyattst. 


Private. 


40 




450 


Cooney 


Beacon st. 


Line st. 


Private. 


26 




220 


Cottage ave. 


Russell St. 


Chester st. 


Public. 


40 


*500 


.. 


Cottage place 


Washington st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


about 11 




150 


Craigie 


Somerville ave. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


50 


1,2.50 




Crescent 


Washington st. 


Pearl st. 


Private. 


30 to 38 




650 


Crocker 


Highland ave 


Crown St. 


Public. 


40 


'528 




Cross 


Medford st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


45 


2,6.50 




Cross 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


40 


1,100 


.. 


Crown 


Porter st. 


Lowell St. 


Private. 


30 




700 


Curtis 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Public. 


40 


2,300 




Cutler 


Lawrence st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 




'170 


Cutter 


Broadway 


Webster st. 


Public. 


40 


740 


.. 


Cutter ave. 


Summer st. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


40 


430 




Cutter place 


Cutter ave. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


30 




155 


Cypress 


Central st. 


Beech st. 


Public. 


40 


262 


•• 


Dana 


Bonair st. 


Pearl st. 


Public. 


40 


690 




Dane 


Somerville ave. 


Washington st. 


Public. 


40 


1,270 




Dane ct. 


Dane st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


30 




600 


Dartmouth 


Medford st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


1,450 




Day 


Elm St. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


940 




*Dean ave. 


Morrison ave. 


Boston ave. 


Private. 


40 




l',i45 


Delaware 


Aldrich st. 


Pearl st. 


Public. 


40 


4.51 




Dell 


Glen St. 


Tufts St. 


Private. 


40 




465 


Derby 


Temple st. 


Wheatland st. 


Public. 


40 


1,031 




Dexter 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


50 




25 


Dickinson 


Springfield st. 


Beacon st. 


Public. 


40 


'770 




Dimick 


Concord ave. 


Calvin St. 


Private. 


40 




'860 


Distillhouse 


South St. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


35 




150 


Dix place 


Linwood st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


10 




100 


DoYer 


Elm St. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


'940 




Dow 


North St. 


Easterly 


Private. 


40 




'645 


Downer place 


Downer st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


20 




125 


Downer 


Nashua st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


20 




120 


Durham 


Beacon st. 


Hanson st. 


Private. 


40 




450 


Earle 


South St. 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Private. 


30 




500 


East Albion 


E. of Moreland st. 


Medford line 


Private. 


40 




490 


Eastman place 


Highland ave. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


40 




300 


East Newton 


Prospect St. 


Webster ave. 


Public. 


25 


'470 




*Edgeworth 


Mystic ave. 


Melrose st. 


Private. 


50 




1,380 


Edmands 


Broadway 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


40 




.525 


Electric ave. 


Curtis St. 


Westminster st. 


Private. 


40 




265 


Eliot 


Vine St. 


Park St. 


Public. 


40 


'26O 


, . 


Ellington road 


Highland ave. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


35 




120 


Ellington road 


West St. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


30 




405 



Proposed. 



470 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 
APPENDIX F. — Continued. 









Public 
or 


Width 
in 


Length. 


Street. 


From. 


To. 


Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Ellsworth 


Cross St. 


Rush St. 


Public. 


40 


210 




Elm ct. 


Villa ave. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


18 




"'70 


Elm place 


Harvard st. 


East'ly & West'ly 


Private. 


30 




400 


Elm 


Somerville ave. 


Cherry st. 


Public. 


63 


1,500 


' 


Elm 


Cherry st. 


White St. 


Public. 


63 to 60 


330 




Elm 


White St. 


Banks st. 


Public. 


60 


660 


, , 


Elm 


Banks st. 


Beech st. 


Public. 


60 to 77.5 


290 


, . 


Elm 


Beech st. 


Tenney st. 


Public. 


77.5 to 60 


570 




Elm 


Tenney st. 


Medford line 


Public. 


60 


4,300 




Elmwood 


Holland st. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


40 




970 


Elston 


Elm St. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


'396 




Emerson 


Everett st. 


Newton st. 


Private. 


30 




170 


Emery 


Fitchburg R. R. 


South St. 


Private. 


30 




530 


Endicott ave. 


Broadway 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


40 




800 


Essex 


Medford st. 


Richdale ave. 


Public. 


40 


232 




Eustis court 


Beacon st. 


Southwest 


Private. 


30 




150 


Everett 


Webster ave. 


Newton st. 


Private. 


30 




350 


Everett ave. 


Cross St. 


Dana st. 


Public. 


40 


'soo 




Evergreen ave. 


Marshall st. 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


40 


1,320 




Evergreen sq. 


Porter st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


8 


•• 


200 


Fairlee 


Cherry st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


30 




150 


Fairmount ave. 


Curtis St. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


40 




700 


Fanning ave. 


Highland ave. 


Lexington ave. 


Public. 


50 


376 




Farragut ave. 


Broadway 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


40 




840 


Fenwick 


Broadway 


Heath st. 


Public. 


40 


340 




Fisk ave. 


Hinckley st. 


Lowell St. 


Private. 


20 and 25 




'460 


Fitchburg ct. 


Fitchburg st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


10 




225 


Fitchburg 


Linwood st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


40 




400 


Fitchburg 


Linden st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


20 




300 


Flint ave. 


Flint St. 


Northerly 


Private. 


40 




200 


Flint 


Franklin st. 


Aldrich st. 


Public. 


40 


l',773 




Florence 


Washington st. 


Perkins st. 


Public. 


40 


1,280 




Folger 


Broadway 


Fairmount ave. 


Private. 


40 




'28O 


Forrest 


Beacon st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


'l50 




Forster 


Sycamore st. 


Central st. 


Private. 


30 




'430 


Fosket 


Willow ave. 


Liberty ave. 


Private. 


40 




670 


Fountain ave. 


Cross St. 


Glen St. 


Private. 


30 




550 


Francesca ave. 


Elm St. 


Liberty ave. 


Public. 


40 


'762 




Francis 


Porter st. 


Conweil St. 


Private. 


30 




ISO 


Franklin ave. 


Washington st. 


Franklin st. 


Private. 


20 




500 


Franklin ct. 


Somerville ave. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 




, . 


200 


Franklin place 


Franklin st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


15 




100 


Franklin 


Broadway 


Northerly 


Private. 


40 




120 


Franklin 


Broadway 


Washington st. 


Public. 


40+ 


2,230 




*Frederick ave. 


Willow ave. 


Cedar st. 


Private. 


45 




1,360 


Fremont 


Main St. 


Near Mystic ave. 


Private. 


40 




1,397 


Fremont ave. 


Parker st. 


East'ly & West'ly 


Private. 


30 




235 


Frost ave. 


Somerville ave. 


Dane st. 


Private. 


35 




550 


Garden ct. 


Somerville ave. 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Private. 


25 


, , 


370 


Garfield ave. 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Private. 


40 




1,150 


Garrison ave. 


Broadway 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


40 




850 


George 


Broadway 


Lincoln ave. 


Private. 


40 




350 


Gibbens 


Central st. 


Benton ave. 


Public. 


40 


'492 




Giles place 


Walnut St. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


32.71 




168 


GiU's ct. 


Franklin st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


10 




100 


Gilman 


Cross St. 


Walnut St. 


Public. 


40 


1,430 




Gilman terrace 


Pearl st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


40 




360 


Glass House ct. 


Webster ave. 


Easterly 


Private. 


40 




200 


Glen 


Broadway 


Tufts St. 


Public. 


40 


2,300 




Glover circle 


Meacham st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


20 




"iio 


Gordonia road 


Summer st. 


Charnwood road 


Private. 


40 




263 



* Proposed. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



471 



APPENDIX F. — Continued. 









Public 
or 


Width 
in 


Length. 


Street. 


From. 


To. 


Private. 


Feet. 


Public, 


Private. 


Gorham 


Holland st. 


Howard st. 


Public. 


40 


763 




Gould ave. 


Porter st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


16 




'i56 


Grand View ave. 


Walnut St. 


Vinal ave. 


Public. 


40 


470 




Granite 


Somtrville ave. 


Osgood St. 


Private. 


40 




*400 


Grant 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Private. 


40 




1,350 


Greene 


Summer st. 


Laural st. 


Public. 


40 


555 




Greenville 


Medford st. 


High St. 


Public. 


40 


660 




Greenwood terrace 


Beacon st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


2.5 


. . 


165 


Grove 


Elm St. 


Morrison st. 


Public. 


40 


985 


•• 


Hadley ct. 


Franklin st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


20 




150 


Hall 


Cedar st. 


Cherry st. 


Private. 


30 




350 


Hall ave. 


Elm St. 


Liberty ave. 


Public. 


40 


926 


. . 


Hamlet 


Highland ave. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


30 


, . 


400 


HammoHd 


Dickinson st. 


Concord ave. 


Private. 


40 




273 


Hancock 


Elm St. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


781 




Hanson ave. 


Hanson st. 


Easterly 


Private, 


30 


, . 


252 


Hanson 


Washington st. 


Vine St. 


Private. 


35 




750 


Harding 


South St. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


30 




115 


Harris 


Beacon st. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


35 




150 


Harrison 


Ivaloo St. 


Mondamin ct. 


Public. 


40 


335 




Harrison 


Mondamin ct. 


Kent St. 


Private. 


40 




335 


Harrison 


Elmwood St. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


40 




210 


Harvard 


Summer st. 


Beech st. 


Public. 


40 


650 




Harvard place 


Harvard st. 


East'ly & West'ly 


Private. 


35 




400 


Hathorn 


Broadway 


Arlington st. 


Public. 


40 


330 




Hawkins 


Somerville ave. 


Washington st. 


Public. 


40 


330 




Hawthorne 


Willow ave. 


Cutter ave. 


Private. 


30 




810 


Hayden terrace 


Linden ave. 


Easterly 


Private. 


20 




120 


Heath 


Temple st. 


Bond St. 


Public. 


45 


1,043 




Heath 


Bond St. 


Morelandst. 


Private. 


45 




750 


Henderson 


Richardson st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


20 




535 


Hennessey ct. 


Medford st. 


Fisk ave. 


Private. 


20 


.. 


250 


Henry ave. 


Highland ave. 


Lexington ave. 


Private. 


40 




290 


Herbert 


Chester st. 


Day St. 


Public. 


40 


'360 




Hersey 


Berkeley st. 


Oxford St. 


Private. 


40 




230 


High 


Boston St. 


Monroe st. 


Private. 


50 




1,100 


Highland ave. 


:Medford st. 


Davis sq. 


Public. 


60 


9,100 


.. 


Hillside ave. 


Pearl st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


30 




1.50 


Hillside park 


Walnut St. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


40 




245 


Hinckley 


Broadway 


Lawrence st. 


Private. 


30 




430 


Hodgdon place 


Dane ct. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


about 20 




150 


Holland 


Davis sq. 


Broadway 


Public. 


60 


2,650 




HoUis 


Cameron ave. 


W^esterly 


Private. 


30 




422 


Holmes 


Cameron ave. 


Westerly 


Private. 


30 




422 


Holt ct. 


Wyatt St. 


Westerly 


Private. 


10 




70 


Holt's ave. 


Oak St. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


10 




100 


Homer sq. 


Bonner ave. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


30+ 




200 


Horace 


South St. 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Private. 


30 


.. 


510 


Houghton 


Prospect St. 


Springfield st. 


Private. 


40 


.. 


750 


Howard 


Thorndike st. 


Gorham st. 


Private. 


40 




430 


Howard 


W^hipple St. 


Willow ave. 


Private. 


30 


.. 


255 


Howe 


Marshall st. 


School St. 


Public. 


; 40 


445 




Hudson 


Central st. 


Cedar st. 


Public. 


40 


2,760 




Hunting 


South St. 


Carjibridge line 


Private. 


1 30 


•• 


125 


Irving 


Holland st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


' 40 


1,180 




Ivaloo 


Beacon st. 


Park St. 


Public. 


! J^o 


650 


! 


Jackson 


Medford st. 


Maple St. 


Private. 


30 




150 


James 


Pearl st. 


Veazie st. 


Public. 


40 


'320 




Jaques 


Chauncey ave. 


i Temple st. 


Public. 


40 


1,200 


.• 


Jaques 


Temple st. 


1 Bond St. 

1 


Public. 


45 


1 1,050 


■■ 



Proposed. 



472 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 
APPENDIX F. — Continued. 









Public 
or 


Width 
m 


Length. 


Street. 


From. 


To. 


Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


*Jasper 


Pearl st. 


Oilman st. 


Private. 


40 




300 


Jay 


Holland st. 


Howard st. 


Private. 


40 




525 


Jenny Lind ave. 


Vernon st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


1,507 




Jerome ct. 


Sycamore st. 


Jerome st. 


Private. 


10 




150 


Jerome 


Montrose st. 


Jerome ct. 


Private. 


20 




125 


Joseph 


Newton st. 


Northwesterly 


Public. 


40 


385 


.. 


Josephine ave. 


Morrison ave. 


Broadway 


Private. 


45 




1,715 


Joy 


Washington st. 


Poplar St. 


Private. 


30 




1,150 


Joy St. place 


Joy St. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


30 




175 


Kensington ave. 


Broadway 


Blakeley ave. 


Private. 


40 




440 


Kent ct. 


Kent St. 


Northerly 


Private. 


about 25 




420 


Kent 


Somerville ave. 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Private, 


40 




300 


Kent 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Beacon st. 


Private. 


25 




400 


Kenwood 


Elm St. 


Billingham st. 


Private. 


40 




322 


Kidder ave. 


Elm St. 


Willow ave. 


Private. 


40 




1,280 


Kilby 


Somerville ave. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 




180 


Kingman ct. 


Washington st. 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Private. 


25 




400 


Kingston 


Meacham st. 


Campbell pk. 


Private. 


40 




620 


Knapp 


School St. 


Granite st. 


Public. 


40 


*379 


.. 


Knowlton 


Oliver St. 


Tufts St. 


Private. 


40 




925 


Lake 


Hawkins st. 


Church St. 


Public. 


40 


860 


, , 


Lamson ct. 


Linwood st. 


Poplar St. 


Private. 


20 




370 


Landers 


School St. 


Westerly 


Private. 


40 




280 


Laurel ave. 


Laurel st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


18 




125 


Laurel 


Somerville ave. 


Summer st. 


PubHc. 


40 


'940 




Lawrence 


Hinckley st. 


B. &L. R. R. 


Private. 


35 




650 


Lawrence 


Boston ave. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


35 




710 


Lawson terrace 


Putnam st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


5 




200 


Lee 


Medford st. 


Richdale ave. 


Private. 


40 




385 


Leland 


Washington st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


40 




250 


Leon 


Concord ave. 


Dickinson st. 


Public. 


40 


155 




Leonard place 


Joy St. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


13+ 




98 


Lesley ave. 


Highland ave. 


Lexington ave. 


Private. 


40 




333 


Leslie place 


Highland ave. 


Northerly 


Private. 


12 




75 


Lester place 


Meacham st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 




190 


Lexington ave. 


Willow ave. 


Cedar st. 


Private. 


50 




1,360 


Liberty ave. 


Appleton St. 


Broadway 


Private. 


40 




1,495 


Lincoln ave. 


Lincoln st. 


Mt. Vernon st. 


Private. 


40 




450 


Lincoln place 


Lincoln ave. 


Northerly 


Private. 


9 




120 


Lincoln 


Broadway 


Perkins st. 


Public. 


40 


"550 




Linden 


Somerville ave. 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Private. 


30 




705 


Linden ave. 


Elm St. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


45 


1,'()50 




Linden ave. 


Summer st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


45 




'250 


Linden place 


Linden ave. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 




160 


Line 


Washington st. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


33 




1,750 


Linehan ct. 


Linwood st. 


Chestnut st. 


Private. 


about 15 




200 


Linwood place 


Linwood st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


about 12 




150 


Linwood 


Somerville ave. 


Washington st. 


Public. 


50 


2,050 




London 


Linwood st. 


B. &L. R. R. 


Private. 


40 




340 


Loring 


Somerville ave. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


40 




400 


Louisburg place 


Autumn st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


13 




90 


Lowell 


Somerville ave. 


Albion St. 


Private. 


33+ 




2,580 


Lowell 


B. & L. R. R. 


Vernon st. 


Private. 


33+ 




60 


Lowell 


Vernon st. 


Medford st. 


Public. 


40 


1,141 




Lowden 


Broadway 


Fosket St. 


Private. 


40 




1,205 


Madison 


School St. 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


40 


891 




Main 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Public. 


50 


950 




*Malden 


Mystic ave. 


Melrose st. 


Private. 


50 




1,360 


Mallet 


Willow ave. 


Liberty ave. 


Private. 


40 




580 


Malloy ct. 


Somerville ave. 


Merriam ave. 


Private. 


30 




255 



Proposed. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



473 



APPENDIX F. — Continued. 









Public 
or 


Width 
in 


Length. 


Street. 


From. 


To. 


Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private, 


Mansfield 


Somerville ave. 


Washington st. 


Private. 


40 




730 


Maple ave. 


School St. 


Southeasterly 


Private, 


40 




300 


Maple 


Poplar St. 


Jackson st. 


Private, 


30 




470 


Maple place 


Marshall st. 


Maple ave. 


Private, 


5 




125 


Marion 


Concord ave. 


Adrian st. 


Private. 


40 




170 


Marshall 


Broadway 


Pearl st. 


Public. 


40 


1,650 




Mason ave. 


Orchard st. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


3.5 




220 


May place 


Hawkins st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


12 




100 


Mc Culphe place 


Medford st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


10 




110 


McGregor place 


Wigglesworth st. 


Walnut St. 


Private. 


about 10 




250 


Meacham 


Orchard st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


100 




Meacham 


ArlingtonB. R. R. 


Orchard st. 


Private. 


40 




'eoo 


Meacham 


Mt. Vernon ave. 


Medford line 


Private. 


40 




800 


Mead 


Cameron ave. 


Moore St. 


Private. 


40 




340 


Medford 


Cambridge line 


Central st. 


Public. 


50 


s'.ioo 




Medford 


Central st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


55 


1,950 




Melburn place 


Summer st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


30 




125 


Melrose 


Mystic ave. 


Middlesex ave. 


Private. 


50 




2,310 


Melvin 


Broadway 


Bonair st. 


Private. 


40 




487 


Merriam ave. 


Merriam st. 


Malloy ct. 


Private. 


15 




255 


Merriam 


Somerville ave. 


Charlestown st. 


Private. 


30 




500 


Middlesex ave. 


Mystic ave. 


Medford Hne 


Public. 


60 


3,400 




Milk St. place 


Somerville ave. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


about 30 




100 


Miller 


Sacramento st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


33 




350 


Mills 


Walnut St. 


Sargent ave. 


Public. 


40 


'560 




Miner 


Vernon st. 


Ames St. 


Public. 


40 


244 




Minnie ave. 


Meacham st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


40 




705 


Mondamin ct. 


Ivaloo St. 


Harrison st. 


Private. 


25 




250 


Montgomery ave. 


Broadway 


Wellington ave. 


Public. 


40 


265 


.. 


Montrose ct. 


Montrose st. 


B. &L. R. R. 


Private. 


12 




110 


Montrose 


School St. 


Sycamore st. 


Public. 


40 


886 




Moore 


Holland st. 


Mead st. 


Public. 


40 


695 




Moreland 


Main st. 


Mystic ave. 


Private. 


40 




1,513 


Morgan 


Beacon st. 


Park St. 


Public. 


40 




350 


Morrison ave. 


Willow ave. 


Cedar st. 


Private. 


50 


.. 


1,366 


Morrison place 


Morrison st. 


Northerly 


Private. 


20 


.. 


190 


Morrison place 


Morrison pi. 


Easterly 


Private. 


15 




175 


Morrison 


Willow ave. 


Elm St. 


Public. 


40 


1,700 




Mortimer place 


Marshall st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


20 




150 


Morton 


Glen St. 


Knowlton st. 


Private. 


40 




285 


Mossland 


Somerville ave. 


Elm St. 


Public. 


40 


350 


.. 


Mountain ave. 


Linden ave. 


Porter st. 


Private. 


22 




310 


Mousal place 


North Union st. 


B. & M. R. R. 


Private. 


20 




200 


Mt. Pleasant ave. 


Curtis St. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


40 




700 


Mt. Pleasant ct. 


Perkins st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


40 




260 


Mt. Pleasant 


Broadway 


Perkins st. 


Public. 


33 


570 


.. 


Mt. Vernon ave. 


Main st. 


Meacham st. 


Private. 


50 




800 


Mt. Vernon 


Washington st. 


Pearl st. 


Public. 


40 


600 


.. 


Mt. Vernon 


Pearl st. 


Perkins St. 


Public. 


50 


450 


.. 


Mt. Vernon 


Perkins st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


600 


.. 


Monroe 


Walnut St. 


High St. 


Public. 


40 


375 




Murdock 


Cedar st. 


Clyde St. 


Private. 


30 




900 


Murray 


Washington st. 


Southerly 


Private. 


30 


.. 


250 


Museum 


Beacon st. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


40 




170 


Myrtle ct. 


Myrtle st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


10 


• • 


100 


Myrtle 


Washington st. 


Perkins st. 


Public. 


40 


1,400 




Mystic ave. 


Charlestown line 


Union st. 


Public. 


60 


350 


.. 


Mystic ave. 


Union st. 


Medford line 


Public. 


66 


6,900 




Mystic 


Washington st. 


Somerville ave. 


Public. 


40 


360 




Mystic 


Benedict st. 


Mystic ave. 


Private. 


40 




330 


Nashua 


Richardson st. 


B. & L. R. R. 


Private. 


35 




640 


Nevada ave. 


Village St. 


Hanson st. 


Private. 


20 




200 



* Proposed, 



474 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 
APPENDIX F. — Continued. 









Public 
or 


Width 
in 


Length. 


Steeet. 


From. 


To. 


Private. 


Feet. 


PubUc. 


Private. 


Newberne 


Appleton St. 


Morrison st. 


Private. 


40 




200 


Newbury 


Holland st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


1*250 




Newman place 


Cedar st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


10+ 




'ioo 


Newton place 


Newton st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


about 10 




100 


Newton 


Webster ave. 


Concord ave. 


Public. 


40+ 


'650 




Norfolk 


Webster ave. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


200 




North 


Broadway 


Medford line 


PubHc. 


40 


2,550 




North Union 


Mystic ave. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


30 




'eoo 


Norton 


Nashua st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


20 




200 


Norwood ave. 


Broadway 


Medford st. 


Public. 


40 


'350 


•• 


Oak 


Prospect St. 


Angle 


Public. 


40 


670 




Oak 


Angle 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


30 




'530 


Oak St. place 


Oak St. 


Northerly 


Private, 


4 




85 


Oakland ave. 


Marshall st. 


School St. 


Public. 


40 


440 




Olive ave. 


Linden ave. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


2.5 


, , 


155 


Olive sq. 


Lake st. 


Southerly 


Private. 


about 15 


, . 


100 


Oliver 


Franklin st. 


Cross St. 


Pubhc. 


40 


1,050 




Orchard 


Cambridge line 


Meacham st. 


Public. 


40 


1,625 


. . 


Osgood 


Granite st. 


East'ly & West'ly 


Private. 


40 




450 


Otis 


Cross St. 


Wigglesworth st. 


Public. 


40 


1,200 




Oxford 


School St. 


Central st. 


Private. 


30+ 




1,330 


Oxford 


Beacon st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


50 


"ioo 




Packard ave. 


Broadway 


Medford line 


Private. 


60 




2,000 


Palmer ave. 


Franklin st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 




200 


Park ave. 


Elm St. 


Wallace st. 


Public. 


40 


'450 




Park place 


Laurel st. 


Easterly 


Private. 


30 




220 


Park place 


Park pi. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


20 




150 


Park 


Somerville ave. 


Beacon st. 


Public. 


50 


l",300 




Parker place 


Porter st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 




150 


Parker 


Washington st. 


Fremont ave. 


Private. 


35 




200 


Partridge ave. 


Vernon st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


1,457 




Patten ct. 


Cutter St. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


8 




'ioo 


Paulina 


Broadway 


Holland st. 


Private, 


40 




775 


Pearl 


Crescent st. 


Mt. Vernon st. 


Public. 


40 


300 




Pearl 


Mt. Vernon st. 


Franklin st. 


Public. 


50 


950 




Pearl 


Franklin st. 


Cross St. 


Public, 


40 


1,025 




Pearl 


Cross St. 


Medford st. 


Public. 


50 


2,475 




Pearl St. place 


Pearl st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


20 




*200 


*Pearson ave. 


Morrison ave. 


Boston ave. 


Private. 


45 




1,300 


Pembroke ct. 


Pembroke st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


25 


, . 


130 


Pembroke 


Central st. 


Sycamore st. 


Private. 


40 




440 


Perkins place 


Perkins st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


20 




200 


Perkins 


Franklin st. 


Charlestown line 


PubHc. 


40 


1,350 




Pinckney place 


Pinckney st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


24 




'i25 


Pinckney 


Washington st. 


Perkins st. 


Public. 


40 


l",i70 




Pitman 


Beech st. 


Spring St. 


Private. 


30 




'38O 


Pitman 


Spring St. 


Belmont st. 


Private. 


26 




390 


Pleasant ave. 


Walnut St. 


Vinal ave. 


PubHc. 


40 


470 




Poplar ct. 


Poplar St. 


Southeasterly 


Private, 


10 




"80 


Poplar 


Somerville ave. 


Linwood st. 


Private, 


30 




350 


Poplar 


Linwood st. 


Joy St. 


Private, 


35 




300 


Porter ave. 


Porter st. 


Northwesterly 


Private, 


20 




220 


Porter place 


Porter st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


20 




195 


Porter 


Elm St. 


Mountain ave. 


Public. 


45 


1,530 




Porter 


Mountain ave. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


40 


425 




Prescott 


Summer st. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


50 


1,050 




Preston 


School St. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


800 




Professors row 


College ave. 


Curtis St. 


Private. 


40 




1,900 


Propect 


Washington st. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


50 


2,050 




Prospect Hill ave. 


Medford st. 


High St. 


Public. 


40 


450 


.. 


Prospect place 


Prospect St. 


E. Newton st. 


Private. 


20 




130 



Proposed, 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



475 



APPENDIX F. — Contimied. 



Street. 



\ 



Putnam 

Quincy 

Randolph place- 
Raymond ave. 
Record's place 
Reed's ct. 
Remick ct. 
Richardson 
Richdale ave. 
Richmond hi'h'ds 
Roberts 
Robinson 
Rogers ave. 
Roseland 
Rossmore 
Rush 
Russell 

Sacramento 
Sanborn ave. 
Sargent ave. 
Sartwell ave. 
Sawyer ave. 
School 
School 
Sellon place 
Sewall ct. 
Sewall 

Shawmut place 
Shawmut 
Shedd 

Sherman place 
Sherman 
Sibley ct. 
Sibley place 
Simpson ave. 
Skehan 
Smith ave. 
Snow place 
Snow place 
Snow terrace 
Somerville ave. 
Somerville ave. 
South 

*Southwick ave. 
Spring ct. 
Spring 
Springfield 
Stanford terrace 
Stickney ave. 
Stiles 

St. James ave. 
Stone ave. 
Stone place 
Summer 
Summit ave. 
Summit 
Sumner 
Sunnyside ave. 
Sycamore 
Sycamore 



From. 



To. 



Public 

or 
Private. 



Summer st. 

Somerville ave. 

Cross St. 
Curtis St. 
Broadway 
Oliver st. 
Cutter St. 
Lowell St. 
School St. 
Madison st. 
Lawrence st. 
Central st. 
Morrison ave. 
Beacon st. 
Somerville ave. 
Broadway 
Elm St. 

Somerville ave. 
Warren ave. 
Broadway 
Cedar st. 
Packard ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Highland ave. 
Marshall st. 
Sewall St. 
Grant st. 
Shawmut st. 
Washington st. 
Somerville ave. 
Sargent ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Cutter St. 
Cutter St. 
Broadway 
Dane st. 
Beacon st. 
Belmont st. 
Snow pi. 
Jaques st. 
E. Cambridge line, 
Union sq. 
Medford st. 
Morrison ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Somerville ave. 
Concord ave. 
Beacon st. 
Marshall st. 
Cameron ave. 
Elm St. 
Union sq. 
Stone ave. 
Bow St. 
Walnut St. 
Elm St. 
Lawrence st. 
Walnut St. 
Broadway 
Medford st. 



Highland ave. 

Summer st. 

Westerly 
North St. 
Southwesterly 
Southwesterly 
Southeasterly 
Lawrence st. 
Sycamore st. 
Southerly 
Northwesterly 
Bartlett st. 
Broadway 
Cambridge line 
Washington st. 
Flint St. 
Cambridge line 

Cambridge line 

Walnut St. 

Mills St. 

Cherry st. 

Curtis St. 

Highland ave. 

Broadway 

Northwesterly 

Southwesterly 

Temple st. 

Alston St. 

Cross St. 

Merriam ave. 

Marshall st. 

Frost ave. 

Northwesterly 

Northwesterly 

Holland st. 

Durham st. 
' Line st. 

Easterly 
I Northerly 

Southwesterly 
! Union sq. 
, N. Cambridge line 
i Westerly 

Boston ave. 
I Westerly 
I Summer st. 
I Cambridge line 
I Northeasterly 

School St. 

Cambridge line 

Summer st. 

Columbus ave. 

Southeasterly 

Elm St. i 

Vinal ave. | 

Billingham st. 

Northwesterly 

Wigglesworth st 

Medford st. 

Richdale ave. 



Public. 
Public. 

Private. 

Public. 
i Private. 
t Private. 
I Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Pnvate. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

PubHc. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Public. 

Pnvate. 

Public. 

Pubiic. 

Public. 

Private. 

Private. 

Public. 

Private. 



Width 

in 
Feet. 



Length. 



Public. Private. 



50 

40 

15 
40 
10 
20 
10 
35 
40 
30 
20 
40 
45 
40 
40 
40 
40 

40 

40 

40 

35 

40 

40 

50 

12 

25 

40 

30 

40 

40 

10 

35 

10 

10 

40 

30 

25-f- 

30 

25 

16 

75 

70 

30 

40 

20 

40 

40 

20 

40 

40 

40 

40 

30 

45 

45 

40 

20 

35 

45 

40 



1,240 
700 

1,345 



875 
*582 

ioo 

1,400 
700 



2S0 
522 



1,S70 
2,500 



615 
550 



2,300 
8,800 



1,200 
SOO 



488 
676 

r,700 
470 
262 



1,250 



244 

iio 

105 
100 
480 

150 
170 

1*700 



600 



400 
690 



120 
190 

200 

310 
250 
270 
100 
100 
825 
720 
200 
160 
100 
120 



940 
990 
200 



200 
450 
200 



145 



175 
250 

550 



* Proposed. 



476 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 
APPENDIX Y.— Contimied. 









Public 
or 


Width 
in 


Length. 


Street. 


From. 


To. 


Private. 


Feet. 


Public. 


Private. 


Sycamore 


Richdale ave. 


Highland ave. 


Private. 


33 




800 


Sidney 


Wheatland st. 


Temple st. 


Private. 


40 




925 


Talbot ave. 


Packard ave. 


College ave. 


Private. 


50 




1,409 


Taunton 


So. Wyatt St, 


Easterly to angle 


Private. 


30 




170 


Taunton 


Angle 


Marion st. 


Private. 


20 




95 


Taylor place 


Somerville ave. 


Southerly 


Private. 


15 




200 


Taylor 


Mystic ave. 


Sidney st. 


Private. 


40 




310 


Temple 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


PubHc. 


66 


1,540 




Tenney ct. 


Mystic ave. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


30 




400 


Tennyson 


Forster st. 


Medford st. 


Public. 


40 


469 




Tennyson 


Medford st. 


Pembroke st. 


Private, 


40 




'400 


Thorndike 


Holland st. 


Kingston st. 


Private. 


40 




580 


Thorpe place 


Highland ave. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


30 




450 


Thurston 


Broadway 


Richdale ave. 


Public. 


40 


1,660 




Tower ct. 


Tyler st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


25 




150 


Tower 


Crown St. 


Highland ave. 


Private. 


40 




550 


Tremont place 


Tremont st. 


Southeasterly 


Private. 


about 10 


.. 


75 


Tremont 


Webster ave. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


40 


589 




Trull 


Vernon st. 


Medford st. 


Public. 


40 


1,050 




Trull lane 


Highland ave. 


Oxford St. 


Private. 


15 




200 


Tube Works ct. 


Somerville ave. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


20 




150 


Tufts 


Washington st. 


Cross St. 


Public. 


40 


940 




Tyler 


Vine St. 


Dane st. 


Public. 


40 


404 


•• 


Union 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


40 


330 


, , 


Union place 


Linwood st. 


Southwesterly 


Private. 


10 


•• 


100 


Veazie 


Walnut St. 


Bradley st. 


Private. 


40 


.. 


650 


Vernon 


Central st. 


Jenny Lind ave. 


Public. 


40 


740 




Vernon 


Jenny Lind ave. 


Lowell St. 


Private. 


80 




600 


Villa ave. 


Winslow ave. 


Arlington B. R. R. 


Private. 


35 


. ; 


200 


Village 


Dane st. 


Vine St. 


Private. 


25 




370 


Vinal ave. 


Summer st. 


Highland ave. 


Public. 


45 


1,400 




Vinal 


Richardson st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


20 




'200 


Vine ct. 


Vine St. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


25 




140 


Vine 


Somerville ave. 


Hanson st. 


Private. 


40 




780 


Vine 


Hanson st. 


Beacon st. 


Private. 


25 




650 


Virginia 


Aldrich st. 


Jasper st. 


Public. 


40 


405 


•• 


Wade ct. 


Cedar st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


20 


, , 


180 


Waldo 


Highland ave. 


Hudson St. 


Public. 


40 


287 




Wallace 


Holland st. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


1,350 




Walnut 


Bow St. 


Broadway 


Public. 


40 


3,830 




Walter place 


Walter st. 


Southwesterly ■ 


Private. 


40 




222 


Walter 


Walnut St. 


Bradley st. 


Private. 


40 




548 


Ward 


Medford st. 


Earl St. 


Private. 


30 




610 


Warren ave. 


Union sq. 


Columbus ave. 


Public. 


40 


650 




Warren 


Medford st. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


30 




100 


Warwick ave. 


Warwick st. 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


15 




150 


Warwick 


Cedar st. 


Warwick ave. 


Public. 


40 


665 




Washington ave. 


Washington st. 


Northerly 


Private. 


18 




350 


Washmgton 


Charlestown line 


Franklin ave. 


Public. 


75 


1,060 




Washington 


Franklin ave. 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Public. 


60 to 100 


3,870 


.. 


Washington 


Fitchburg R. R. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


60 


2,380 


.. 


Water 


South St. 


Northerly 


Private. 


25 




250 


Waverly 


Washington st. 


Southerly 


Private. 


35 


.. 


200 


Ware 


Curtis St. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


40 




700 


Webster ave. 


Union sq. 


Cambridge line 


Public. 


49.5 


1,950 


.. 


Webster 


Franklin st. 


Cross St. 


Public. 


40 


1,000 




Wellington ave. 


Walnut St. 


Montgomery ave. 


Public. 


40. 


215 


.. 


Wellington ave. 


Montgomery ave, 


Easterly 


Private. 


40 




85 


Wesley pk. 


Wesley sq. 


Northeasterly 


Public. 


40 


'405 





* Proposed. 



REPORT OF THE CITY EXGIXEER. 



477 



APPENDIX F. — Concluded. 









PubUc 
or 


Width 
in 


Length. 


Street. 


From. 


To. 


Private. 


Feet. 


PubUc. 


Private. 


Wesley 


Pearl st. 


Northeast to angle 


Private. 


40 




350 


Wesley 


Angle 


Otis St. 


Private. 


30 




165 


West 


Broadway 


Heath st. 


Private. 


30 


, , 


250 


West 


Hawthorne st. 


Arlington B. R. R. 


Private. 


30 


, , 


590 


Westminster • 


Broadway 


Electric ave. 


Private. 


40 


, . 


376 


Weston ave. 


Clarendon ave. 


Broadway 


Private. 


40 


, . 


525 


Westwood road 


Central st. 


Benton ave. 


Public. 


40 


487 


, . 


Wheatland 


Broadway 


Jaques st. 


Public. 


40 


495 


, , 


Wheatland 


Jaques st. 


Mystic ave. 


Private. 


40 




800 


Wheeler 


Pinckney st. 


Mt. Vernon st. 


Private. 


40 


, , 


269 


Whipple 


Hawthorne st. 


Arlington B. R. R. 


Private. 


30 




575 


White 


Elm St. 


Cambridge line 


Private. 


20 




300 


White St. place 


White St. 


Southeasterly 


Private, 


20 




200 


Wigglesworth 


Bonair st. 


Pearl st. 


Private. 


40 




740 


William 


Chandler st. 


Elm St. 


Public. 


40 


381 




Williams ct. 


Porter st. 


Northwesterly 


Private. 


30 




150 


Willoughby 


Central st. 


Sycamore st. 


Private. 


30 




400 


Willow ave. 


Elm St. 


Broadway 


Public. 


50 


3,440 


• • 


Willow place 


Cambridge line. 


South St. 


Private. 


25 




150 


*Willowdale 


Willow ave. 


Easterly 


Private. 


40 




550 


Wilson ave. 


Broadway 


B. &L. R. R. 


Private. 


20 




310 


Wilton 


Lowell St. 


Lawrence st. 


Private. 


35 




470 


Windom 


Elm St. 


Summer st. 


Public. 


40 


'300 




Winslow ave. 


Elm St. 


Grove St. 


Public. 


40 


514 




Winslow ave. 


Grove st. 


Clifton St. 


Private. 


40 




"572 


Winter 


Elm St. 


Holland st. 


Private. 


30 


, , 


430 


Winter Hill cir. 


Broadway 


Northeasterly 


Private. 


25 




177 


Winthrop ave. 


Broadway 


Mystic ave. 


Public. 


50 


1,1T0 




Woodbine 


Centre st. 


Lowell St. 


Private. 


30 




600 


*Woods ave. 


North St. 


Alewife Brook 


Private. 


40 




1,350 


Wyatt ct 


South Wyatt st. 


Westerly 


Private. 


13 




200 


Wyatt (South) 


Concord ave. 


Northerly 


Private. 


40 




400 


Wyatt (North) 


Washington st. 


Southerly 


Private. 


40 


•• 


350 


York terrace 


Central St. 


Harvard pi. 


Public. 


40 


267 




Total . . . 


274,240 


173,226 















Public. 51.9 miles; private, 32. S miles. 



* Proposed. 



(ao) 



478 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

APPENDIX G. 

Ordinance Regulating City Engineer's Department. 



Duties of 
committee 
on city en- 
gineering. 



Section 1. The Committee on City Engineering shall 
have the care and supervision of the City Engineer's de- 
partment, and the appointment and discharge of all as- 
sistants employed therein shall be with its approval, and it 
shall fix the compensation of every such assistant. 

Cityengi- Sect. 2. The Mayor and Aldermen shall annually, as 

neer, how •' •' ' 

elected. soon after their organization as practicable, appoint a city 
engineer, who shall hold his office for the term of one year, 
unless sooner removed. He shall be removable at the pleas- 
ure of the mayor and aldermen, and a vacancy may be filled 
at any time for the unexpired term. He shall receive such 
compensation as the City Council may determine. 

General Sect. 3. Hc shall bc at the head of the department of 

duties of -"^ 

cjfy^engi- city engineering, and shall exercise a general supervision of 
all matters within said department. He shall be consulted in 
relation to public improvements of every kind, where the 
advice of a Civil Engineer would be of service. He shall 
have the charge, under the direction and control of the 
Committee on City Engineering, of all plans of every kind, 
not especially belonging to other departments, and shall keep 
the same properly classified and indexed ; and he may make 
such rules and regulations concerning the taking of plans from 
his office as he may deem necessary to insure their safety. 



neer. 



Location of 
water- 



Sect. 4. He shall, under the direction of the Water 
plans,' etc. Board, have general supervision of the location of all water- 
pipes in the city, and shall make and keep on file in his office 
accurate plans of the same, said plans to be carefully preserved 
for future reference. 

ft^c^Hobe Sect. 5. He shall, either by himself or his assistants, 

^g^^^e^'^^^^make such surveys, plans, profiles, estimates, and descriptions 



I 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 479 

as may be required of him by the Mayor, either branch of the 
City Council, or any committee thereof ; and he shall per- 
form all other such services, and impart such information 
concerning any department of the city's affairs, properly re- 
lating to the office of City Engineer, as may be required of 
him by the Mayor, either branch of the City Council, or any 
committee, board, or officer thereof. 

Sect. G. He shall take charge of all plans and surveysCityengi- 

<^ i- J neer to have 

relating to the laying out, widening, extending, or grading of^^argeof 

i)i3^ns J etc. J 

streets, and the estabhshiner of correct lines for the same, and^o^ laying 

' ° ' out, etc., of 

of all such structures and public works of the city as the Citystreets. 
Council or any committee thereof may direct; and under 
their direction he shall prepare all plans and specifications for 
the same, and shall prepare, or cause to be prepared, all con- 
tracts that they may require, said specifications and contracts 
to be approved by the City Solicitor; provided, that nothing in 
this section shall be so construed as to authorize him to inter- 
fere with existing departments or boards of officers, or with 
any that may hereafter be established, whose duties may be 
clearly defined. 

Sect. 7. He shall give to all applicants, so far as thecity engf- 
files and records of his office will permit, any informationnishinfor- 

, ,. IT iir !•! mation in 

they may desire as to the lines and grades of streets on whichpossession 
their estates are situated, or upon which they intend to build ; department, 
and all information of this character furnished to owners of 
estates, or persons representing them, or to those intending 
to build, shall be without charge. 



APPENDIX H. 

Ordinance Relating to Sewer Department. 
Section 1. Main drains or common sewers, which shallcommon 

sGwcrs i 

be ordered by the Board of Aldermen to be made, shall bes., c. 5b,§i. 
laid in such places and manner, and shall be made of such 
materials and dimensions, as the Committee on Sewers shall 



480 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

direct, unless the Mayor and Aldermen specially determine 
otherwise. 

Every sewer or drain, laid in any land, or street, or way, 

public or private, opened, or proposed to be opened, for 

public travel and accommodation, for the purpose of draining 

more than one estate, shall be deemed to be a common 

To be laid scwcr, and no such common sewer shall be laid or connected 

only by 

city. with any existing common sewer, except by the city. No 

person shall cut into, interfere with, or obstruct a main drain 
or common sewer, or shall enter, or attempt to enter, a private 
or other drain or sewer therein, or into any private drain 
connecting with any main drain or common sewer, except 
in accordance with a permit in writing from the City 
Engineer. 

Landtaken Sect. 2. When land is taken for the purpose of con- 

lor sewers. 

P.S., c. 50, structing a main drain or common sewer, the proceedings 
shall be the same as provided in chapter fifteen of these 
ordinances in regard to the laying out of streets or ways in 
the city. 

Entrance of Sect. 3. Said committec shall have full power to direct 

private ^ 

drains into ^nd coutrol the placcs and manner of entering^ all private 

mam ^ ox 

drains. drains into such main drains or common sewers. 

Committee Sect. 4. The Committee on Sewers shall have the direc- 

on sewers. 

tion and control, subject to the orders of the Board of Alder- 
men, of all the main drains and common sewers of the city, 
and of the construction, maintenai:»ce, repairs, and use of the 
same. 

The City Engineer, under the direction of the Committee 
on Sewers, shall have the supervision and control of the con- 
struction, alteration, repairs, and maintenance of such drains 
neSto^^" ai^d sewers, and all appurtenances thereto and connections 
constmc- therewith ; and when sewers are constructed he shall cause 
Snf*^'' °^ accurate plans thereof to be made, representing their loca- 
tion, depth, and materials, with a ''section plan" of each 
sewer, indicating its size, shape, thickness, and construction, 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 481 

and he shall cause to be shown by said plans all existing con- 
nections with said sewers, and all future connections as they 
are made. 

The location of all catch-basins shall be under the direc- 
tion of the City Engineer. 

The City Engineer and Clerk of the Committee on Sewers 
shall, on the last day of each calendar week, prepare pay-rolls 
made up to the end of such week, of all employees in the 
Sewer Department required by law to be paid weekly, and 
present the same to the Chairman of the Committee on 
Sewers for approval, and on the last day of each month (or 
as soon as practicable, not exceeding four days thereafter) 
shall prepare pay-rolls for other labor and materials purchasedpay-roiisof 
in the Sewer Department, and present the same with the billSpaTtment. 
to the Committee on Sewers. 399. '' 

Sect. 5. Whenever any street is opened for the laying of^Pg"^^"!^®^ 
pipes for water, gas, or other purposes, or for the prosecution^a^^'P^ip^^'^^ 
of any works of construction, such laying of pipes and the^'<^- 
work connected therewith, or such work of construction, shall 
be so executed as not to obstruct in anv wav the course, 
capacity, or construction of a common sewer ; and whenever 
pipes for any purpose or any work of construction are found to 
exist at such a depth or in such a location as to interfere with 
any existing sewer, or with the building of any common sewer 
of the required size and at the proper depth and grades, the 
department, corporation, or person maintaining the same 
shall, upon notice thereof, at once remove, change, or alter 
said pipe or pipes, or other works, in such manner as the City 
Engineer may direct. If such department, corporation, or 
person neglects to comply immediately with the terms of such 
notification, the City Engineer may make such removal, 
change, or alteration, and the cost thereof shall be paid by 
such department, corporation, or person. 

Sect. 6. The Committee on Sewers shall keep an accu- Committee 

. , on sewers to 

rate account of the cost of each mam dram or common sewerkeep ac- 
count of 

constructed, and make report thereof to the Board of Alder-cost, and re- 
port. 

men. 



482 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Sewer as- 



Sect. 7. The Board of Aldermen shall make assessments 
trbe^made ^^^ ^^^ main drains or common sewers heretofore constructed 
afde°men°^ or reconstructcd by the city, the expenses of which have not 
R s., c. 50 already been assessed and collected, in the same manner as 
for those which may hereafter be constructed ; and the City 
Engineer shall render all the services and perform all the 
duties in regard to the main drains or common sewers hereto- 
fore constructed, the expenses of which have not already been 
assessed and collected, which he is required to render and 
perform in regard to those hereafter" to be constructed. 

Apportion- Sect. 8. In makinsj assessments for constructing or re- 

ment of ° ^ 

sewer as- pairing main drains or common sewers, the Board of Aldermen 

sessments. 

P. s., c. 50, may deduct from the expenses such part as they may deem 
expedient, to be charged to, and paid by, the city, and shall 
apportion and assess the remainder, or the whole, if no de- 
duction be made, upon the persons and estates benefited by 
the main drains or common sewers, either by the entry 
of their drains thereinto, or by any more remote means, and 
shall prescribe when such assessment shall be paid. 

Sewer as- Sect. 9. The Board of Aldermen shall deliver a list of 

sessments 

to be given such asscssmeiits, when made, to the Collector of Taxes, for 

to collector 

forcoiiec- collection, who shall forthwith, in writing, demand the same 

tion. p. S., ' JO) 

c. 50, §5. of the parties liable, and proceed in the collection thereof, in 
the manner prescribed by law. 



Size, mate- 



Sect. 10. Every drain which enters into any common 
rials', etc., scwcr in any Street shall be built of such size and materials, 

of drains. 

P. s.,c. 80, in such direction, at such grade, and in such manner as shall 
be satisfactory to the Committee on Sewers, and with a due 
observance of all regulations of the Board of Health, so far 
as applicable thereto ; and every opening into such common 
sewer for the purpose of connecting a drain therewith, and 
the repairs of every drain laid from any house, building, 
cellar, or land to such common sewer, and every opening into 
such drain, and all openings and excavations in any street for 

Srtobe^' the purpose of constructing or repairing any private drain, 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



483 



shall be made by a person licensed in writing for that purpose^^^°^^^-_^ 
by the Board of Aldermen, and by no other person. § ^-• 

All licenses under this chapter shall expire on the first day 
of May annually, unless sooner revoked by the Board of 
Aldermen, 

Sect. 11. Any person licensed as provided in the pre-^^^J^g'^^^^" 
ceding section shall, before performing any work authorized^^^^p^^^' 
thereby, execute a bond to the city, in such sum as the Board*^- ^^' § ■^^• 
of Aldermen may prescribe, with one or more sureties, satis- 
factory to them, conditioned that he will properly make the 
openings into all common sewers opened by him ; that he 
will construct or repair the drains to be connected by him 
with the common sewers or with other drains, in a thorough 
and workmanlike manner; that he wdll leave no material or 
obstruction of any description in the sewer w^hich he may 
open, or in any drain leading into any sewer ; that he will 
properly close up the excavation, and restore the earth and 
pavement taken up, and regrade and repave the street, and 
put it in good and proper condition, and remove all super- 
fluous material, all to the satisfaction of the superintendent - 
of streets; and if he fails so to do, or if at any time within 
one year from the date of the completion of* any drain, the 
surface of the street shall settle or otherwise become unsafe 
for public travel, then the Superintendent of Streets shall re- 
pave and regrade the street at the expense of the said drain 
layer, and within five days thereafter deliver a bill of the 
same to the treasurer for collection, and said drain layer shall 
immediately pay the same, and he shall not be entitled to 
receive another permit until the said bill and all other bills 
of expense incurred by the city on account of his negligence 
or default, shall be paid in full ; also, that he will cause a 
sufficient fence to be placed so as to enclose the excavation, 
and the earth, stone, and other materials which may be put 
into the street, and that he will maintain such fence during 
the whole time such excavation, earth, or other material may 
obstruct the street, and will cause a sufficient number of 
lighted lanterns to be maintained in suitable places over such 



484 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

excavation, earth, material, and fence, from the beginning of 
twihght every evening and through every night during the 
time such obstruction in the street may exist ; and, further, 
that he will comply with the ordinances which may be at any 
time in force in relation to sewers, drains, and streets, and 
with such orders and regulations as the Board of Aldermen 
have adopted, or may from time to time adopt, for the gov- 
ernment of persons Hcensed to construct or repair private 
drains, or open or dig in the streets for that purpose ; and 
that he will indemnify and save harmless the city from all 
damages, costs, and expenses which it may incur or sustain, 
by reason of any and all injuries resulting to any one in per- 
son or property, from the neglect or carelessness of himself 
or his servants in opening, closing, making, or repairing any 
sewer or drain, in performing work connected therewith, or 
in properly fencing, or in lighting by night any excavation or 
obstruction caused or made by him or his servants, or which 
the city may incur or sustain in any manner by reason of the 
excavation or construction of any sewer or drain by him or 
his servants or agents, or any work or acts performed or done 
by him or them connected therewith. 

No licensed drain layer shall perform any piece of work 
such as is specified in section ten of this ordinance, without 
first obtaining a written permit therefor from the City Engi- 
neer J and he shall in all cases comply with every condition 
of such permit. 

Penalty for Sect. 12. Whocver shall employ any person not licensed 

employing -"■ -^ ■' '- 

unlicensed |;o lay private drains in this city, to perform any work such 
layer. ^s is Specified in section ten of this ordinance, shall be liable 
for all damages caused by such person, as well as to the pen- 
alty hereinafter provided. 

Owners of Sect. 13. Any real estate, to the owner or owners of 

private 

drains not towMch pcrmission has been or may be ^iven to construct pri- 

be exempt ^ y o 

from assess- yatc drains for such estate, shall not by the construction of 

ment for 

common such private drains be exempted from any assessment law- 
sewers. 

fully imposed for constructing common sewers in the same 
vicinity. 



REPORT OF THE CUT ENGINEER. 485 

Sect. 14. No drain connecting with a common sewer, P^^^'^^i^^- 

° 'ject to the 

subject to the action of the tide-water, shall be constructed^"^°^9,^^^® 

■' ' tide to have 

without a plug or clapper to prevent completely the reflux oM^s or 
drainage matter, storm or tide-waters. 

Sect: 15. No exhaust from steam-ensrines and no blow-E'^^^^s^ 

'-' blow-on. 

off from steam-boilers shall be connected with any common 
sewer or private drain. 

Sect. 16. No person shall place or deposit in any catch- p^^^J^.^o"^ 

^ c r J intertermg, 

basin any animal or vegetable matter, sohd or liquid, or any^^^^-'^^i^h 
other filthy substance, or any solid matter of any kind. 

Sect. 17. Any person who shall violate any of the pro-^.^^^'^y ^°^ 

•' ^ '' ^ violation 01 

visions of this ordinance shall be liable to a penalty of not°'''i^°^°"- 
more than twenty dollars. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports^ 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports^ 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Cojnbiittee ox Fire Department, 
January 1, 1895. 

To THE City Council of Somerville : — 

The Committee on Fire Department presents the following report 
for the year 1894 : — 

The manual force of the department consists of one hundred and 
two men, including the Chief and assistant engineers, and the acting 
call ladder-men on Ladder Company No. 2, who have not as yet 
received full appointment. 

The apparatus in service consists of three steam fire engines — 
one of which is held in reserve, two ladder trucks, five hose wagons, 
one combination chemical and hose wagon, and one chemical engine ; 
one ladder truck and the chemical engine being additional apparatus 
purchased and placed in active service during the year by authority 
of the City Council. The chemical engine was purchased in pur- 
suance of an order dated March 28, 1894, of S. F. Hayward & Co., 
for the sum of $1,825, and was received and placed in active service 
July 1, 1894. Its value to the city and citizens has on several oc- 
casions been clearly demonstrated, the fires in a number of houses 
having been extinguished by the chemical engine alone, thereby pre- 
venting large losses which would have occurred had the houses been 
flooded with water. 

The ladder truck was purchased in pursuance of an order dated 
June 13, 1894, of the Combination Ladder Co., for the sum of S2,250, 
and was received and placed in service December 1. The truck pur- 
chased is what is known as the "Seagrave Truck," the truck itself and 
all the ladders being trussed ; they are therefore made lighter, and con- 



490 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

sequently easier to handle and operate. The workmanship of the 
whole apparatus is first class, and your committee believes it to be a 
valuable addition to the department. 



LAND FOR ENGINE HOUSE, WARD ONE. 

In pursuance of an order, dated March 28, 1894, there was pur- 
chased of Frank Jones and George H. Goodwin, trustees, a lot of land 
at the corner of Broadway and Franklin street extension, containing 
eight thousand, two hundred and seventy-nine feet, for the sum of 
$6,000. 

CENTRAL FIRE STATION. 

Under authority of orders of the City Council, dated March 28, 
May 23, and June 13, plans prepared by Aaron H. Gould, architect, 
were accepted for the Central Fire Station, proposals received and 
contracts awarded to George M. Starbird for its construction, for the 
sum of $24,875, and to the Smith & Anthony Co. for heating, for the 
sum of $993. 

Work was begun under the contract the last of May, and the 
building was completed December 31, although it was to have been 
finished December 1. The delay was occasioned by the putting in of 
a granite foundation instead of blue stone, the committee considering 
the granite preferable to blue stone, the change being secured at no 
extra cost to the city. 

The committee is of the opinion that the city has in its Central 
Fire Station a building surpassed by none for the purpose designed. 
It is as strongly and substantially built as any ever built within the 
city limits, and is commodious and convenient in its arrangement. 
It is designed not only for the immediate wants of the department, 
but also for its future needs. Ample facihties for growth in the de- 
mands of the fire-alarm system are provided in the arrangement of the 
battery and the battery room, which are estimated sufficient for the 
next fifty years. 

By an order, dated June 13, the committee was authorized to pur- 
chase a new fire-alarm repeater, galvometers, and other apparatus 
connected therewith ; to change the number of fire-alarm circuits ; 



1 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FIRE DEPARTMENT. 491 

and also purchase a new bell, furniture, etc., for the new station. 
Acting under said order a new eight-circuit repeater was purchased 
of the Gamewell Fire Alarm Co., the fire-alarm circuits were increased 
from three to six, and a new bell weighing three thousand and forty- 
two pounds was purchased of the Blake Bell Co., and placed in the 
tower of the new station. 



HOOK AND LADDER STATION. 

By authority of orders, dated March 28, May 23, and June 13, 
plans prepared by Loring & Phipps, architects, were accepted for a 
Hook and Ladder Station, on Highland avenue, proposals received, 
and contracts awarded to George M. Starbird for its construction, for 
the sum of $9,541.96, and to Albert B. Franklin for heating apparatus 
for the sum of S494. The construction of the building was begun 
the first of June, and was completed November 25. 

Both the Central Fire Station and Hook and Ladder Station were 
occupied and used by the department as soon as completed. 



FIRE-ALARM BOXES. 

Now that ample provision has been made for the fire-alarm bat- 
tery, your committee would recommend the purchase of a reasonable 
number of new fire-alarm boxes, to be distributed over the city. A 
prompt alarm insures a promptness in reaching a fire, which is im- 
possible unless fire-alarm boxes are within easy reach of every one. 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

The experience of the past year in the matter of the care and 
custody of the fire-alarm telegraph leads your committee to recom- 
mend that it be placed entirely in the hands of the Committee on 
Fire Department and the Chief Engineer, and that they be held re- 
sponsible therefor. Divided authority is not desirable in such an im- 
portant matter, and it would seem by comparison of the expenses of 
this year and those of 1892, that considerable saving could be made. 



492 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



BUILDINGS. 

The old buildings used by the department have all been repaired, 
and some have been painted inside and out. A new floor, or part of 
a new floor, was put into the stable used by Hook and Ladder Co. 
No. One^ on Washington street, as there was danger of the horses 
falling through. We especially call the attention of the City Council 
to this building, which is entirely out of date, and is not adapted to 
the wants of the department of to-day. It is the most important fire 
station in the city, as it is surrounded by more valuable taxable prop- 
erty than any other station. The large buildings in Union square, 
the churches and schools in the immediate vicinity, the millions of 
dollars worth of property of the North Packing & Provision Co., John 
P. Squire & Co., N. E. Dressed Meat & Wool Co., the Fitchburg rail- 
road freight yard, the Union Glass Co., the several oil companies, 
and other large establishments near by, and on the other side of 
Union square, the American Tube Works and Middlesex Heachery are 
all within the fire limits of this station. 

A proper protection of this valuable area not only requires but de- 
mands that a steam fire engine be placed in or near Union square. 
Your committee would therefore recommend that a new fire station be 
built to accommodate a steam fire engine, hose wagon, and ladder truck, 
and would suggest that it be erected on the site now occupied by the 
Prospect Hill School. 

HYDRANTS. 

The recommendations of the committee of last year in the matter 
of hydrants, are respectfully referred to you for your consideration. 

In conclusion, we submit as the wants of the fire department for 
the coming year the following : 



New fire-alarm boxes. 
New fire station. Ward One. 
New fire station in Union square. 
More hydrants. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FIRE DEPART:MEXT. 



493 



The appropriation for fire department for the year 1894, was 
$43j000 ; the amount paid out was 848,091.13; amounts expended, 
over appropriation and credits, 84,961.74. 

In the appropriation no provision was made for the new men and 
apparatus placed in active service during the year. The salaries of 
the new men alone amounted to 81,200. 

The bills left ovei from 1893, in accordance with custom, were 
considerably more than 83,000, but it was thought best by the com- 
mittee, and His Honor, the Mayor, to pay all outstanding bills and 
leave the new committee, as far as possible, free from incumbrances. 

A detailed statement of appropriations, receipts, and expenditures 
is submitted herewith. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ACCOUNT. 



Credit. 



Apppropriation .... 


. 843,000.00 




Receipts : 






Rebate on telephone rentals . 


43.75 




For manure sold . 


19.00 




copper and zinc 


66.64 




Total credit 


, 


843,129.39 



Debit. 
Expenditures : 

For salaries of permanent men 
salaries of call men 
substitute drivers 
improvements and repairs of ap- 
paratus and vehicles 
new vehicles and apparatus 
improvements and repairs of 
buildings and furniture, and 
new furniture .... 

A77iounts carried forward . 
(31) 



818,004.40 
8,449.12 
2,325.22 

846.17 
190.00 



2,113.10 



831,928.01 



843,129.39 



494 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forivard . 
jfire-alarm telegraph 
hose and repairing hose 
supplies . ., . 
new horses 
grain and feed . 
hay and straw . 
washing and ironing . 

fuel 

harnesses and repairing same 

horseshoeing 

water .... 

gas 

ice ..... 

insurance 

hand fire extinguishers 

horse medicine and doctoring 

telephones .... 

incidentals 

Total debit . 

Amount overdrawn 



531,928.01 

3,571.74 

1,261.10 

156.84 

940.00 

880.92 

1,610.04 

221.48 

1,040.53 

387.86 

568.36 

3,359.00 

662.82 

80.00 

447.50 

80.99 

120.50 

90.35 

683.09 



$43,129.39 



$48,091.13 



$4,961.74 



FIRE DEPARTMENT.— LAND FOR FIRE STATION, WARD 

ONE, ACCOUNT. 



Appropriation 



Credit. 



$6,000.00 



Debit. 

Expenditure : 

For land corner Broadway and Frankhn street 



$6,000.00 



• REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



495 



FIRE DEPARTMENT.— CENTRAL FIRE STATION, BRASTOW 
SCHOOL LOT, ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 
Appropriation $26,000.00 

Debit. 
Expenditures : 

George M. Starbird, on account 



contract ..... 


$20,000.00 




iron H. Gould, architects' ser- 






vices ..... 


921.87 




)r water service .... 


91.00 




iron work ..... 


11.30 




gilding vane .... 


39.78 




constructing driveway 


1,222.48 




Total expenditures 




822,286.43 


Balance unexpended 


83,713.57 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. — CENTRAL FIRE STATION, ELEC- 
TRICAL APPARATUS AND FURNITURE, ACCOUNT. 



S5,250.00 



Credit. 




Appropriation ..... 


. 


Debit. 




J_jA.UCilLli LUi Co . 

For labor on fire-alarm system 


S687.51 


fire-alarm wire and cable 


271.30 


jars, copper, etc. 


204.15 


fire-alarm bell .... 


536.51 


horse for use on fire-alarm system 


90.00 


landing pads for sliding poles 


50.00 


fire-alarm fixtures, etc. 


266.85 



Total expenditures 
Balance unexpended 



2,106.32 
§3,143.68 



496 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. — HOOK AND LADDER STATION, 
HIGHLAND AVENUE, ACCOUNT. 



Credit. 
Appropriation . . 


. . . 


$10,000.00 


Debit. 






Expenditures : 






George M. Starbird, on account 






contract ..... 


$7,800.00 




George M. Starbird, extra work 


388.45 




Loring & Phipps, architects' services 


477.00 




For water service . 


26.90 




connecting gas . 




12.99 




gas fixtures 




72.00 




electric wiring . 




77.60 




concreting . 




218.08 




grading 




55.68 




hardware . . . 




20.63 




harness and door springs 




63.00 




taxes on land for 1893 




20.15 




Total expenditures 


. . 


9,232.48 


Balance unexpended 


$767.52 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. — HOOK . AND LADDER STATION, 
HIGHLAND AVENUE, EQUIPMENTS AND FURNI- 
TURE, ACCOUNT. 



Appropriation . 

Expenditures : 
For ladder truck 
horses 



Credit. 
Debit. 



$2,250.00 
400.00 



$3,750.00 



Amounts carried forward . 



$2,650.00 



$3,750.00 



REPORT OF THE CO:iBIITTEE ON FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



49' 



Amounts brought forward . 
harnesses and horse clothing 
heating apparatus 
fire-alarm gong and indicator 
hose washing machine 
furniture . . . ". 

Total expenditures 

Balance unexpended 



$2,650.00 


83,750.00 


174.30 




497.50 




175.00 




60.00 




162.20 




. 


3,719.00 


. 


$31.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. — CHEMICAL ENGINE AND EQUIP- 
MENTS, ACCOUNT. 



Appropriation . 



Credit. 



Debit. 



cpenditures : 




For chemical engine 


. $ 1,825.00 


plate for engine . 


36.00 


hose pipe . 


80.00 


horses 


325.00 


harnesses . 


136.00 


blankets 


17.25 


carpentering 


46.43 


water service 


32.85 


Total credit 





$3,000.00 



2,498.53 



Balance unexpended 



8501.4' 



For the Committee, 



FRANKLIN J. HAMBLIN, Chairman. 
WILLIAM P. MITCHELL, Clerk. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE 
DEPARTMENT. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. Sent 
down for concurrence, 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, in 
concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERViLLE. 



Office of Chief Engineer of Fire Department, I 

January 1, 1895. j 

To THE Committee on Fire Department : — 

Gentlemen : — I herewith present to you a report of the operations 
of the Fire Department for the year ending December 31, 1894. 

The number of fire alarms during the year was one hundred and 
thirty-one, of which one hundred and eight were bell alarms and 
twenty-three were still alarms. 

The total loss by fire was 879,1-44, and the amount of insurance 
covering property was S144,944. 



MANUAL FORCE. 

The manual force of the department consists of one hundred and 
two men ; of this number twenty-two are permanent and eighty are 
call men. There are now nine vacancies in the call force. 

The manual force of the department is distributed as follows : 

One Chief Engineer 
One Assistant Engineer 
Engine Company No. 1 
Engine Company No. 4 
Ladder Company No. 1 
Ladder Company No. 2 
Hose Company No. 1 
Hose Company No. 2 
Hose Company No. 3 
Hose Company No. 5 
Chemical Company A 



4 permanent 


and 10 call 


men. 


6 


'' 8 




2 


'•' 13 




2 


'•' 12 




1 


u 9 




1 


'•' 9 




1 


u 9 




1 


'' 9 




3 


'•' 





502 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



OBITUARY. 

During the year the department has lost one of its most faithful 
members, William A. Perry, who died of hemorrhage at Engine House 
No. 1, on November 1. He was driver of Engine No. 1, and had 
been a member of the department for ten years. 



APPARATUS. 

The apparatus in service consists of two steam fire engines, one 
chemical engine, four hose wagons, two ladder trucks, and one com- 
bination hose, chemical and ladder wagon. There are also one relief 
engine, one ladder truck, and two hose reels not in permanent service. 
Ladder Truck No. 2 and Chemical Engine A have been added to the 
equipment of the department during the past year, and companies 
organized to operate them. 

BUILDINGS. 

The new central fire station which has been erected during the 
past year at the junction of Medford street and Highland avenue, has 
been built in anticipation of all demands of the department which may 
be made for a number of years to come. On the first floor accommo- 
dations are furnished for a steam fire engine, hose wagon, chemical 
engine, fire-alarm wagon, and chief engineer's wagon, and there is 
also ample room for an aerial truck. This is a piece of apparatus 
which the city will soon require, as such apparatus is very valuable as 
a means of saving life, and a necessity in extinguishing fires in build- 
ings three or more stories in height. The second floor of the station 
is devoted to sleeping-rooms for the permanent men, a recreation 
room, office of the chief engineer, toilet rooms, hay loft, etc. The 
third floor is used exclusively for the apparatus connected with the fire- 
alarm system, and is divided into an ample and commodious battery 
room, a large room for the electrical machinery, and a well-appointed 
work room. The building, as a whole, is in every way equal to that 
owned by any city in the State, and one in which the citizens of Som- 
erville may ustly take pride. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF EXGIXEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 503 

A new station has also been erected on Highland avenue, near 
Cedar street, for the accommodation of a ladder truck, which is now 
in service. This building is also designed to accommodate additional 
apparatus, which will soon be required for the western part of the city. 

The other buildings of the department are in good condition, 
needing only ordinary repairs, with the exception of the wooden 
building on Webster street, occupied by Hose Company Xo. 1. This 
building, which was erected about 1865 for the accommodation of a 
hand hose carriage, has been in constant use, and though extensive 
repairs and improvements have been made upon it from time to time, 
it would require a considerable expenditure of money lo put. it into 
proper condition. I would recommend that only such repairs as are 
absolutely necessary to keep it serviceable be made upon it, and that a 
new building be erected upon the land owned by the city on Broad- 
way, opposite Franklin street. 

CIVIL SERVICE. 

Under the provisions of Chapter ninety-five of the Acts of the 
Legislature of 1893, the Board of Aldermen, on the 28th of June, 
1893, passed an order requesting the Civil Service Commissioners to 

include in the classified service all permanent members thereafter to 
be appointed in this department. Such request having been complied 
with, the appointments to the permanent force since the passage of 
said order, have been made under the Civil Service rules. 



HYDRANTS. 

I wish at this time to express my appreciation of the good work 
which has been done by the Water Board during the year, in the 
location of hydrants. Whereas, until recently, hydrants have been at 
considerable distance, one from another, the Board has endeavored to 
locate them at as frequent intervals as possible, and with an interven- 
ing distance, when possible, of not over three hundred feet. 
Obviously this makes a considerable saving in the length of hose 
required to reach a fire; the pressure obtained is much stronger and 
the streams more effective. 



504 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SERVICE PERFORMED BY THE SEVERAL COMPANIES. 





Engine Co. 


Hose Company. 


Ladder 

Co. 
No. 1. 


Chemi- 




No. 1. 


No. 4. 


No. 1. 


No. 2. 


No. 3. 


No. 5. 


Co. A.* 


Feet of hose used. • . • 


11,650 


12,600 


14,850 


8,600 


14,650 


10,900 






Feet of ladders used. 


150 


1,350 


830 


135 




231 


2,955 


325 


Feet of chemical hose 

jj5g(J ,. 


9 


5,400 

28 


27 


13 


12 


20 




4,400 
51 


No. of 30-gal. chemical 
tanks used 

No. of 30 -gal. chemical 
tanks used 

No. of hand chemical 
extinguishers used. • 


No. of miles run 


165 


121 


145 


91 


70 


150 


213 


91 


Number of still alarms 
an«;wprpf] 


8 


12 


18 


3 


4 


6 


4 


1 







* In service six months. 



I desire to extend my sincere thanks to His Honor, the Mayor, 
and the Honorable Committee on Fire Department for their support 
in all matters appertaining to the department. 

Respectfully submitted, 



JAMES R. HOPKINS, 

Chief of Fu'e Department. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON FUEL AND STREET 

LIGHTS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January i6, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the xVnnual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 16, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Ix Committee ox Fuel axd Street Lights, I 
January 1, 1895. j 

To THE ClT\' COUXCIL OF SOMERVILLE : 

The following is the final report of the Committee on Fuel and 
Street Lights for the year ending December 31, 1894. 



Appropriation 



SCHOOL FUEL ACCOUNT 

Credit. 

89,000.00 



Fuel removed from Brastow School building 26.75 



Total credit 


• 


Debit. 




Expenditures : — 




For fuel to Beach Street School 


S 43.95 


Bell School 


417.46 


Bennett School 


138.99 


Bingham School 


417.89 


Burns School 


272.00 


Cedar Street School 


43.55 


Cummings School . 


195.25 


Davis School 


252.76 



Amounts carried forward 



. 81,781.85 



89,026.75 



89,026.75 



508 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts 


brought forward 


$1,781.85 




Durell School 


115.00 




Edgerly School 


1,252.10 




Forster School 


542.25 




Franklin School 


228.19 




Glines School 


546.60 




Harvard School 


22.97 




High School 


169.45 




Highland School . 


825.45 




Jackson School 


178.26 




Knapp School 


624.53 




Lincoln School 


183.35 




Morse School 


735.26 




Pope School 


962.46 




Prescott School 


540.23 




Prospect Hill 


228.33 




Church building (for 






school purposes) 


11.84 



$9,026.75 



Total debit 
Balance unexpended 



,948.12 



$78.63 



STREET LIGHTS ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 

Appropriation .... $44,000.00 

Receipts for old lanterns . . 165.00 

Total credit ..... $44,165.00 

Debit. 
Expenditures : — 

For electric lighting . . $42,648.39 

lighting and care of oil lamps 39.60 

changing location of electric 

lights and poles . . 74.00 

Amounts carried forward $42,761.99 $44,165.00 



REPORT OF THE COM^IITTEE ON FUEL AND STREET LIGHTS. 509 

S42,761.99 844,165.00 



Amounts brought forward 
instruments for testing electric 

lines and lights 
moving gas lamp poles 
printing .... 
car fares .... 

Total debit 

Balance unexpended 



141.25 
14.10 

34.60 
3.90 



842,955.84 
Sl,209.16 



SCHOOL FUEL. 

In pursuance of authority conferred on this committee by an 
order dated July 11, 1894, contracts were made with Horatio 
Wellington & Company, and B. F. Wild & Company, for furnishing 
coal, and with the Baker-Hunnewell Company for furnishing wood 
until December 31, 1894, at the following prices : 



Coal. 


Wood. 


Furnace. 


Egg. 


Stove. 


Hard. 


Soft. 


$4.31 


$4.31 


$4.31 


$7.75 


85.75 



and fuel has been purchased as authorized by said order. The com- 
mittee was especially fortunate in securing prices for coal ; the price 
being $1.04 per ton less than was paid in the year 1893, while the 
price for wood was the same for both years. 



STREET LIGHTS. 

January 1, 1894, there were in the city three hundred and eighteen 
arc, and two hundred and ten incandescent electric lamps, and three 
oil lamps. 

The three oil lamps, which are located on Boston avenue near the 
(32) 



510 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Medford line, are on the extreme outskirts of the city, and are cared 
for by the Wheeler Reflector Company. 

During the year it has been the policy of the committee to sub- 
stitute arc for incandescent lights as far as possible, one arc frequently 
being of much more service, and lighting much better than several in- 
candescents. During the year there have been added thirty arc 
lights and twenty-one incandescents, and twenty-three incandescents 
have been discontinued, making a total in the city, December 31, 
1894, of three hundred and forty-eight arcs and two hundred and 
eight incandescents. 

The committee has carefully considered the locations of lights so as 
to secure the best results, and the locations of many of them have been 
changed, so as to light as much as possible in every direction, and it 
is recommended that the trees on the highways be trimmed early in 
the Spring so that the best possible results may be obtained. 

Following is a table showing the number of lamps in the city, the 
locations of the same being given in the report of the Superintendent 
of Electric Lines and Lights : 







o 


^ ^ 






to 

ex. 


%H 


S 6 






s 


<U Oh 


a; ^— 1 


"rt 




yA 


w 1 

C3 


'^a 






-;:5 


o K-! 


Gj !- 






o 


< 






Lamps in the city January 1, 1894, as per 










last report . . . . . 


3 


318 


210 


531 


Erected during the year . . ' . 




30 


21 


51 


Discontinued during the year 






23 


23 


Lamps now in service 


3 


348 


208 


559 



For the Committee, 

ISAIAH H. WILEY, Chairman. 
WILLIAM P. MITCHELL, Clerk. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 30, 1895. 
Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. Sent 
down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of Electric Lines and Lights, 
CiTT Hall, January 1, 1895. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the City Council : — 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit my report relating to 
street lights for the year 1894. 

There were in the city on January 1, 1894, five hundred and thirty- 
one street lamps. During the year thirty electric arcs and twenty- 
one incandescents have been added, and twenty-three incandescents 
discontinued, making the number in the city December 31, 1894, 
three oil lamps, three hundred and forty-eight electric arcs, and two 
hundred and eight incandescents. Three of the arc lights are situated 
on city parks, one on Central Hill and two on Broadway. 

The arc and incandescent lights are to burn, by teims of the con- 
tract made for five years from October 1, 1892, three thousand, eight 
hundred and twenty-eight hours in each year. A schedule of the time 
of lighting and extinguishing is given to the company each month 
by me. 

A fine of six cents per hour for arc, and one cent per hour for in- 
candescent lights is imposed on the company for all lights out during 
the time they should be in service. The way of obtaining the outs is 
by the police patrolmen, the best way yet devised, as the police cover 
the whole city, and a report from them each morning comes as near 
being correct as any that can be obtained without great expense. 

At the present time the Electric Light Co. has but one man to 
patrol the entire city. This is an insufficient force, and I would again 
recommend that the company appoint an additional patrolman. It 
could be arranged that these two men should receive from police 
headquarters from time to time during the night, the locations of lamps 



514 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

not burning, as reported by police patrolmen, and by communicating 
these outs to the Electric Light Co. a better lighting service could be 
rendered the city. 

An am-meter and also a volt-meter have been purchased, and tests 
in ascertaining the quantity of light have been made. 

In many places we are not getting the best results from our lamps 
on account of the trees which shade our streets. The only remedy 
for this will be a general trimming, which it is hoped will be done 
before the trees leaf out in the Spring. 

The electric arc lamps in streets are placed as follows : Four upon 
iron extensions, which belong to the city; one (in Union Square) on 
an iron extension belonging to the West End Street Railway Com- 
pany ; three suspended across the street, twenty upon wooden poles, 
and three hundred and seventeen upon arms. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 



515 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS. 

The following table gives the location of lights, their kinds, and 
how placed : — 



ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTS. 



O ^ 



Adams street, between Broadway and 

Medford street 
Adrian street, near Knapp School 
Albion street, cor. Centre street 
Albion street, near Cedar street 
Albion street, near No. 104 
Alpine street 

Ames street, opp. Miner street 
Appleton street, cor. Newberne street 
Arlington street, near Hathorn street 
Arthur street, between Broadway and 

Bonair ..... 
Ashland street, cor. Sartwell avenue 
Auburn avenue, in front of estate No. 21 
Austin street, cor. Benedict street 
Avon street, near School street . 
Bartlett street, opp. Robinson street 
Beach street, at bend 
Beach street, near Spring street . 
Beacon street, between Sacramento and 

Harris streets 
Beacon street, cor. Kent street 
Beacon street, cor. Sacramento street 
Beacon street, cor. Smith avenue 
Beacon street, cor. Washington street 
Beacon street, opp. Buckingham street 
Beacon street, opp. Concord avenue 
Beacon street, opp. Forest street 
Beacon street, opp. Ivaloo street 
Beacon street, opp. Park street . 
Belmont street, cor. Belmont place 
Benton avenue, opp. Gibbens street 
Berkeley street, cor. Hersey street 
Bonair street, cor. Arthur street . 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



516 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS.— Continued. 



ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTS. 



l\< 



Bond street, at elbow 

Boston street, cor. Greenville street 

Boston street, cor. Prospect Hill avenue 

Bow street, cor. Bow-street place 

Bow street, cor. Walnut street 

Bow street, cor. Wesley park 

Brastow avenue 

Broadway, at Willow Bridge over B. & 

L. R. R 

Broadway, cor. Adams street 
Broadway, cor. Benedict avenue 
Broadway, cor. Cedar street 
Broadway, cor. Dartmouth street 
Broadway, cor. Elm street . 
Broadway, cor. Endicott avenue 
Broadway, cor. Fenwick avenue . 
Broadway, cor. Holland street 
Broadway, cor. Main street 
Broadway, cor. Marshall street 
Broadway, cor. Medford street . 
Broadway, cor. North street 
Broadway, opp. Packard avenue 
Broadway, cor. Union street 
Broadway, cor. Wallace street 
Broadway, cor. Willow avenue 
Broadway, front of estate No. 285 
Broadway, opp. Cross street 
Broadway, opp. Franklin street . 
Broadway, opp. Glen street 
Broadway, opp. Partridge avenue 
Broadway, opp. School street 
Broadway Parkway 
Cameron avenue, cor. Mead street 
Carlton street, cor. Lake street . 
Cedar street, opp. Clyde street . 
Central street, at Berkeley street 
Central street, between estates No. 192 

and 194 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 



517 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS.— Continued. 



ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTS. 



Bonner avenue 
Warren avenue 



Central street, cor. York terrace 

Central street, opp. Albion street 

Central street, opp. Forster street 

Central street, opp. Vernon street 

Chandler street, near Chapel street 

Chandler street, near WilHam street 

Chauncey avenue 

Cherry street, opp. Sartvvell avenue 

Chestnut street . 

Church street 

Claremon street 

Clarendon avenue 

Columbia street 

Columbus avenue, cor 

Columbus avenue, cor 

Concord avenue, at Leon street . 

Concord avenue, at Springfield street 

Concord square, opp. Knapp School 

Cottage avenue, in front of estate No. 21 

Craigie street 

Crescent street, cor. Pearl street 

Crocker street, at Hospital 

Cross street, at Lowell Railroad Bridge 

Cross street, cor. Oliver street 

Cross street, cor. Otis street 

Cross street, cor. Pearl street 

Cross street, opp. estate Xo. 62 . 

Curtis street, cor. Professors' Row 

Curtis street, opp. Fairmount avenue 

Cutter street, near Sibley court . 

Cypress street, between Central and 

Beech street . 
Dana street, cor. Otis street 
Dane street, opp. Dane avenue 
Davis square 

Day street, cor. Orchard street 
Day street, opp. Herbert street 



518 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS.— Cojtifi'mied. 



ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTS. 



Delaware street, at elbow 

Dimick street, cor. Buckingham street 

Dover street, at Glover circle 

Elm street, at White street 

Elm street, cor. Chester street 

Elm street, cor. Elston street 

Elm street, cor. Kenwood street 

Elm street, cor. Mossland street 

Elm street, cor. Russell street 

Elm street, cor. William street . 

Elm street, cor. Willow avenue 

Elm street, opp. Davenport street 

Elm street, opp. Morrison street 

Elm street, opp. Porter street 

Elm street, opp. Winter street 

Elm wood street, in front of escate No 

22 

Everett avenue, opp. estate No. 23 
Evergreen avenue, at Dartmouth street 
Evergreen avenue, at Marshall street 
Evergreen avenue, at School street 
Evergreen avenue, at Thurston street 
Fanning avenue, cor. Lexington avenue 
Flint street, opp. Flint place 
Flint street, opp. Rush street 
Florence street, between estates No. 33 

and 35 . 
Fountain avenue, opp. estate No. 12 
Francesca avenue, between Elm street 

and Liberty avenue 
Franklin street, opp. Flint street 
Franklin street, opp. Perkins street 
Fremont street, between estates No. 11 

and 17 . 
Frost avenue, at bend 
Oilman square .... 
Oilman street, cor. Aldrich street 



o •^. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 



519 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS.— Continued. 



ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTS. 



M 



Oilman street, opp. Jasper street 

Glen street, cor. Flint street 

Glen street, opp. Brook street 

Gorham street, cor. Howard street 

Grand View avenue 

Grant street, cor. Sewall street 

Greene street, at bend 

Hall avenue, between Elm street and 

Liberty avenue 
Hancock street .... 
Harrison street, junction Mondamin 

court ..... 
Harvard street, cor. Harvard place 
Heath street, cor. Bond street 
Heath street, opp. estate No. 44 
High street, opp. Prospect Hill avenue 
Highland avenue, at Central street 
Highland avenue, cor. Belmont street 
Highland avenue, cor. Cedar street 
Highland avenue, cor. Cherry street 
Highland avenue, cor. Grove street 
Highland avenue, cor. Medford street 
Highland avenue, cor. Porter street 
Highland avenue, cor. School street 
Highland avenue, cor. Walnut street 
Highland avenue, cor. West street 
Highland avenue, cor. Willow avenue 
Highland avenue, opp. Prescott street 
Highland avenue, opp. Trull lane 
Holland street, cor. Cameron avenue 
Holland street, opp. Gorham street 
Holland street, opp. Wallace street 
Hudson street, at bend 
Hudson street, near Benton avenue 
Hudson street, cor. Lowell street 
Irving street, near Holland street 
Jaques street, cor. Temple street 



520 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS.— Continued. 



ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTS. 



Jay Street, between Holland street, and 

Howard street .... 

Jenny Lind avenue, between Medford 

and Vernon streets 
Joy street, cor. Leonard place 
Kidder avenue, cor. Liberty avenue 
Kingston street, opp. Campbell Park 
Laurel street, near Greene street 
Lincoln street, at Lincoln avenue 
Linden avenue, cor. Linden place 
Linden avenue, near Elm street . 
Linwood street, between Poplar and 

Washington streets 
Linwood street, cor. Poplar street 
Lowell street, between Summer street 

and Somerville avenue 
Lowell street, cor. Fiske avenue . 
Lowell street, opp. Wilton street 
Madison street .... 
Main street, cor. Moreland street 
Maple street .... 
Marion street, cor. Cook street . 
Marshall street, cor. Stickney avenue 
Marshall street, opp. Howe street 
Meacham street, opp. Kingston street 
Medford street, at Central square 
Medford street, cor. Central street 
Medford street, cor. Essex street 
Medford street, cor. Greenville street 
Medford street, cor. Jenny Lind avenue 
Medford street, cor. Norwood avenue 
Medford street, cor. School street 
Medford street, cor. Somerville avenue 
Medford street, cor. South street 
Medford street, cor. Sycamore street . 
Medford street, cor. Thurston street . 
Medford street, cor. Walnut street 



\A 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 



521 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS.— Continued. 



ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTS. 



vt 


X 


-a 




•yj 


i> 










•v3 














O 


^ 


^ 


^ 


c. 


^ 


< 


^ 


"~ 










V 




















O 


o 


W 




M 



Medford street, cor. Ward street 
Medford street, in front of estate No 

137 ... . 

Miller street 
Montrose street 
Moore street, cor. Mead street 
Morgan street, at bend 
Morrison street, opp. Clifton street 
Morrison street, opp. Grove street 
Morrison street, opp. Rogers avenue 
Mt. Pleasant street 
Mt. Vernon street, at Lincoln avenue 
Myrtle street, at top of hill 
Myrtle street, near Washington street 
Mystic avenue, near Medford line 
Mystic avenue, cor. Middlesex avenue 
Mystic avenue, cor. North Union street 
Mystic street (ward 1) 
Newton street, cor. Joseph street 
Newbury street .... 
Oak street, at bend 
Oakland avenue, cor. School street 
Oliver street, cor. Glen street 
Orchard street, cor. Chester street 
Orchard street, cor. Dover street 
Orchard street, cor. Russell street 
Park avenue, opp. Chandler street 
Park street, between Somerville avenue 

and Fitchburg railroad 
Parker street, cor. Fremont avenue 
Partridge avenue, between T^Iedford and 

Vernon streets 
Pearl street, cor. Aldrich street 
Pearl street, cor. Bradley street 
Pearl street, cor. Florence street 
Pearl street, cor. Franklin street 
Pearl street, cor. Glen street 



5 22 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS.— Continued. 



ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTS. 



Pearl street, cor. Mt. Vernon street 
Pearl street, cor. Walnut street . 
Perkins street, cor. Mt. Pleasant street 
Perkins street, opp. Pinckney street 
Pinckney street, between Pearl and 

Washington streets 
Prescott street .... 
Preston street, near School street 
Professors' Row, at College avenue 
Professors' Row, at Packard avenue 
Professors' Row, opp. new street 
Prospect street, cor. Prospect place 
Prospect street, opp. Oak street . 
Putnam street, midway betw^een High 

land avenue and Summer street 
Quincy street, midway Somerville ave 

nue and Summer street . 
Richardson street, opp. Henderson 

street ..... 
Richdale avenue, opp. Lee street 
Rossmore street, midway between Som- 
erville avenue and Washington street 
Rush street, cor. Brook street 
Sargent avenue, cor. Sherman place 
School street, opp. Berkeley street 
School street, opp. Montrose street 
Springfield street, opp. Houghton street 
Somerville avenue, at Central street 
Somerville avenue, at Craigie street 
Somerville avenue, at Fitchburg rail 

road bridge .... 
Somerville avenue, at Fitchburg R. R 

crossing .... 

Somerville avenue, at Spring street 
Somerville avenue, cor. Franklin court 
Somerville avenue, cor. Granite street 
Somerville avenue, cor. Laurel street 



a V 
O t? 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 



523 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS.— Continued. 



ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTS. 



o -^ 

(4 



Somerville avenue, cor. Prospect street 
Somerville avenue, cor. Sacramento 

street ..... 
Somerville avenue, cor. School street 
Somerville avenue, cor. Washington st 
Somerville avenue, near Bow street 
Somerville avenue, near Mystic street 
Somerville avenue, near oil works at 

Fitchburg railroad crossing 
Somerville avenue, opp. Hawkins street 
Somerville avenue, opp. Poplar street 
Spring street, near estate No. 42 
St. James avenue 

Summer street, cor. Belmont street 
Summer street, cor. Benton avenue 
Summer street, cor. Cedar street 
Summer street, cor. Central street 
Summer street, cor. Cherry street 
Summer street, cor. Porter street 
Summer street, cor. Prescott street 
Summer street, cor. Preston street 
Summer street, cor. Putnam street 
Summer street, cor. School street 
Summer street, cor. Spring street 
Summer street, cor. Vinal avenue 
Summer street, cor. Willow avenue 
Summer street, opp. Windom street 
Summit street, cor. Billingham street 
Svcamore street, in front of estate No 

' 141 

Svcamore street, cor. Montrose street 
Sycamore street, near Highland avenue 
Temple street, cor. Sewall street 
Temple street, opp. Derby street 
Tennyson street, between Forster and 

Medford streets . . . . 

Thorndike street . . . . 



524 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS.— Continued. 



ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTS. 



Tremont street . 
Tufts street, cor. Glen street 
Union square ..... 
Vernon street, cor. Trull street 
Vinal avenue, opp. Aldersey street 
Vinal avenue, opp. Pleasant avenue 
Vine street, cor. Eliot street 
Wallace street .... 
Walnut street, cor. Aldersey street 
Walnut street, cor. Columbus avenue 
Walnut street, opp. Mills street . 
Walnut street, cor. Summit avenue 
Ware street .... 

Warren avenue, cor. Sanborn avenue 
Washington street, at Fitchburg rail 

road bridge .... 
Washington street, at Medford street 
Washington street, cor. Bonner avenue 
Washington street, cor. Bowdoin street 
Washington street, cor. Calvin street . 
Washington street, cor. Florence street 
Washington street, cor. Mt. Vernon 

street ...... 

Washington street, cor. Mystic street . 
Washington street, cor. Washington 

avenue . . . . . . 

Washington street, opp. Franklin street 
Washington street, opp. Joy street 
Washington street, opp. Kingman court 
Washington street, opp. Tufts street 
Webster avenue, junct. Newton street at 

Fitchburg railroad . . . . 

Webster avenue, opp. Everett street . 
Webster avenue, opp. Norfolk street . 
Webster avenue, opp. Prospect street . 
Webster street, opp. Cutter street 
Webster street, opp. Rush street 



w 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 



525 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTS.— Condt^ded. 



ELECTRIC ARC LIGHTS. 


On Poles. 


e 
< 

c 

C 


« 

•a 

c 

V 
Ck. 

s 


E.2 

C U 

C X 


Wellington avenue, opp. Montgomery 

avenue ..... 
Wheatland street, cor. Jaques street 
Wigglesworth street, cor. Otis street 
Willow avenue, opp. Morrison street 
Wilton street, cor. Lawrence street 
Winslow avenue, cor. Grove street 
Wyatt street .... 






1 
1 




■ 






Total 


20 


317 


3 


5 



(33) 



526 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

LOCATIONS OF INCANDESCENT LIGHTS. 



LOCATION. 



Allen street, at end. 

Allen street, near Somerville ave. 

Arnold court. 

Autumn street, cor. Louisburg pi. 

Belmont street, between Highland 

avenue and Summer street. 
Belmont street, cor. Snow place. 
Benedict street, between Nos. 3 

and 5. 
Bleachery Court (2). 
Bolton street. 

Bolton street, corner Oak street. 
Bonair street, corner Cross street. 
Bonair street, cor. Melvin street. 
Bonair street, corner Wigglesworth 

street. 
Bonair street, in front of No. 85. 
Boston street, corner High street. 
Bow street place. 
Bowdoin street, at Fremont ave. 
Bradford avenue. 
Broadway, between Liberty and 

Willow avenues. 
Broadway, near Arlington line. 
Broadway place. 

Cedar avenue, cor. Linden avenue. 
Cedar street,at Lowell R.R. bridge. 
Cedar street, at railroad crossing. 
Cedar street, corner Hall avenue. 
Cedar street, opposite No. 14. 
Cedar street, opposite Sartwell ave. 
Central St., at Lowell R.R. bridge. 
Central street, opp. Hudson street. 
Chapel court. 

Chester avenue, opposite No. 19. 
Chester place. 

Claremon street, near Mead street. 
Clark street. 

Clyde street, cor. Murdock street. 
College avenue (2). 
Columbia street, opp. Casey court. 



LOCATION. 



Concord avenue, between Concord 
square and Prospect street. 

Cooney street, corner Line street. 

Craigie street, opposite No. 74. 

Crescent street, opposite No. 10. 

Curtis street, between Weare street 
and Raymond avenue. 

Dane avenue (2). 

Dane street, at Fitchburg railroad. 

Dane street, corner Frost avenue. 

Day street, opposite No. 38. 

Dell street. 

Dickinson street, opposite Ham- 
mond street. 

Ellsworth street, between Cross 
and Rush streets. 

Elm place, near westerly end. 

Elm street, corner Chapel street. 

Emerson street. 

Everett street, opposite Emerson 
street. 

Fairmount avenue. 

Fitchburg street. 

Flint street. 

Florence street, between Perkins 
and Pearl streets. 

Forster street, cor. Tennyson st. 

Franklin avenue. 

Franklin street, between Washing- 
ington street and Hadley court. 

Franklin street, cor. Oliver street. 

Garden court (2). 

George street. 

Giles place. • 

Oilman street, between iVldrich 
and Cross streets. 

Oilman street, cor. Walnut street. 

Glen street, between Pearl and 
Flint streets. 

Granite street, opp. Knapp street. 

Hall street. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF LIGHTS. 527 

LOCATIONS OF INCANDESCENT LIGHTS.— Co7i^inue^. 



LOCATION. 



LOCATION. 



Hamlet street (2). 

Hanson street, cor. Durham street. 

Hanson street, cor. Skehan street. 

Harris street, near Beacon street. 

Hawkins street, cor. Lake street. 

Heath street, opposite West street. 

Hillside avenue. 

Hinckley street, opp. Fiske ave. 

Holt place, corner Oak street. 

Homer square. 

Houghton street, opp. Bolton st. 

Howe street, corner School street. 

Irving street (o). 

Ivaloo street. 

James street. 

Jaques street, between Grant and 

Temple streets. 
Jaques street, between Temple 

and Bond streets. 
Jerome street, at bend. 
Joseph street, corner Adrian street. 
Joy street, opposite No. 68. 
Kent court (2). 
Kent street, at railroad. 
Kingman court. 
Lake street, between Hawkins and 

Carlton streets. 
Lake street, cor. South Church st. 
Lake street, corner Oliver square. 
Laurel street, opposite No. 27. 
Leon street, at Dickinson street. 
Lester terrace. 
Line street, between Cambridge 

line and Smith avenue. 
Line street, between Cooney street 

and Smith avenue. 
Line street, cor. Smith avenue. 
Line street, near Washington st. 
Linden street (2). 
Linvvood street, near Washington 

street. 



London street. 

Loring street, at end. 

Loring street, cor. Somerville ave. 

Lowell street, cor. Richardson st. 

Lowell street, cor. Vernon street. 

Madison street, near School street. 

Maple avenue. 

Marshall street, cor. Sherman ct. 

Mason avenue. 

May place. 

McGregor place. 

Meacham street, opp. Orchard st. 

Medford St., at Fitchburg railroad. 

Medford street, at J. P. Squires' 

factory. 
Medford street, cor. Adams street. 
Medford street, opp. N. E. Dressed 

Meat and Wool Co.'s works. 
Mills street, at Sargent ave. 
Mills street, opp. No. 23. 
Mossland street, between Elm and 

Somerville avenue. 
Munroe street, between Bigelow 

and Greenville streets. 
Munroe street, between Boston 

street and Prospect Hill avenue. 
Munroe street, between Walnut 

and Bigelow streets. 
Murdock street (2). 
Myrtle street, between Perkins 

and Pearl streets. 
]\Iystic avenue, cor. Austin street. 
Mystic avenue, near Boston line. 
Oakland avenue, opposite No. 10. 
Otis street, opposite No. 25. 
Oxford street, between Hersey 

and Central streets. 
Oxford street, between Trull Lane 

and School street. 
Oxford street, cor. Hersey street. 
Park street, cor. Ivaloo street. 



528 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

LOCATIONS OF INCANDESCENT LIGHTS.— Conc/utfe^. 



LOCATION. 



Pearl street, between Franklin 

street, and Hillside avenue. 
Pearl street, corner Rush street. 
Pearl street place. 
Pembroke st., near Sycamore st. 
Perkins place. 

Perkins street, cor. Mt. Vernon st. 
Perkins street, opp. Florence st. 
Perkins street, opposite Myrtle st. 
Pitman street. 
Pleasant avenue. 

Poplar street, opp. Chestnut street. 
Porter street, cor. Williams court. 
Prospect street, between Oak 

street and Cambridge line. 
Putnam street, opposite No. 65. 
Richdale avenue. 
School street, between Preston 

and Osgood streets. 
School street, opposite Landers 

street. 
Sherman street. 
Skehan street, at end. 
Skehan street, corner Dane street. 
Somerville avenue, at Beach street. 
Somerville avenue, at Belmont st. 
South street, cor. Hunting street. 
Summer street, between Harvard 

and Central streets. 
Summer street, corner Craigie st. 
Stickney avenue, opposite No. 8. 
Stickney avenue, opposite No. 24. 



LOCATION. 



Stone avenue, near Columbus ave. 

Summit avenue. 

Sunnyside avenue. 

Sycamore street, cor. Madison st. 

Sycamore street, opp. Forster st. 

Tenney court. 

Thorpe place (2). 

Tufts street, corner Dell place. 

Tyler street, opposite Tower court. 

Vernon street, cor. Jenny Lind ave. 

Vernon street, opp. Bartlett st. 

Vernon street, opposite Miner st. 

Vine street, near Beacon street. 

Vine street, opposite Hanson st. 

Vine street, opposite Tyler street. 

Virginia street (2). 

Waldo street. 

Walnut street, corner Veazie st. 

Walnut street, near Bow street. 

Walnut street, near Broadway. 

Ward street, at end. 

Warwick street (2). 

Washington street, cor. Hanson st. 

Washington street, cor. Wyatt st. 

W^averly street, at end. 

Webster street, near Franklin st. 

Wesley park. 

Wesley park, opposite No. 1 1. 

Wesley street, at end. 

Wesley street, near Pearl street. 

Wilson avenue. 

Wyatt street, corner Cook street. 



Respectfully submitted, 

LEIGHTON W. MANNING, 
Superintendent of Electric Lines and Lights. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January i6, 1895 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 16, 1895. 
Accepted, in concurrence, and referred to the Committee on Printing, to be 
printed in the Annual Reports, 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Ix CO-MMITTEE ON PUBLIC PrOPERIT, I 

January 1, 1895. | 

To THE City Coun'cil of Soisierville : — 

The Committee on Public Property presents the following report 
for the year 1894 : — 



POLICE STATION INCIDENTALS ACCOUNT. 





Credit. 




Appropriation 


. 


$3,500.00 


Transfer from Schoolhouse Incidentals 




account . 


. 


600.00 


Receipts for rent of armory 


. 


300.00 


Receipts for old junk 


, , 


7.00 


Total credit . 


• 




Debit. 




Expenditures : — 






For janitor's salary . 


• • 


$ 850.00 


gas . 


. 


921.77 


fuel . 


. 


387.50 


water 


. 


92.40 


insurance . 


. 


300.00 


disinfectant 


. 


27.33 


repairs and improvements of 




buildings and furniture . 


2,341.66 


incidentals 


• * 


46.14 


Total debit . 


• 


Amount overdraw 


n 





$4,407.00 



4,966.80 



S559.80 



532 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



SCHOOLHOUSE INCIDENTALS. 

Credit. 
Appropriation ... . $12,000.00 

Received from Dana W. Bennett : — 

rebate on insurance . . 61.80 

Received from Hartford Steam Boiler 

Insurance Co. : — 

rebate on insurance . . 50.00 

Received from sale of old iron . 1.00 



Total credit . 


• 


Debit. 




Transfer to Police Station Incidentals 




account ..... 


% 600.00 


Expenditures : — 




For repairs . . . . 


7,251.70 


improvements . 


1,089.89 


furniture .... 


1,326.04 


repairing furniture 


455.56 


repairing heating apparatus 


1,447.60 


repairing blackboards 


143.94 


insurance .... 


2,036.94 


emptying privy vaults 


48.00 


heat, rent, etc. ( Superintend- 




ent of Schools' office) 


334.75 


setting edgestones at Durell 




School .... 


88.34 


concrete walks . 


468.00 


moving furniture from Web- 




ster School 


44.00 


adjusting Webster School- 




house insurance 


22.50 


school supplies . 


269.55 


books and printing 


15.00 


A^nounis carried forward 


$15,641.81 



2,112.80 



$12,112.80. 



REPORT OF IHE CO^DIITTEE OX PUBLIC PROPERTY. 



533 



A77iounts brought forward 
For care of church for school 
purposes 

carriage hire 

incidentals 

Total debit 
Amount overdrawn 



S15,641.81 


812,112.80 


25.00 




32.50 




23.08 




. 


15,722.39 


. 


83,609.59 



The expenditures at the various schoolhouses were as follows : 







Beech 


Street. 




Repairs . 


^ 


• • • 






829.02 


Repairing 


heating 


apparatus 






39.70 






Luther 


V 


. Belt. 




Repairs . 


, 


• • . 






81,097.14 


Improvements 


. 








94.00 


Furniture 


. 


. 








206.53 


Repairing 


furniture 


. 








65.70 


Repairing 


heating 


apparatus 








35.87 


Repairing 


blackboards 








14.81 


Insurance 


• 


. 








50.00 



8 68.72 



1,564.05 



Bennett. 



Repairs .... 
Repairing heating apparatus 
Removing night soil 



866.74 
77.64 

20.00 



164.38 



Amount carried forward 



81,797.15 



534 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward 



SI, 797. 15 



Bingham. 



Repairs 




$868.76 




Improvements 




70.20 




Furniture 




76.75 




Repairing furniture 




100.75 




Repairing heating apparatus 




5.10 




Insurance 




125.00 


1 946 56 




Burns. 




X j^iryj 9tJ \J 


Repairs .... 


, 


$ 73.89 




Repairing heating apparatus 


. 


121.75 




Insurance 


• 


50.00 


245 64 


Cedar Street. 




i- TX t-' • VTC 


Repairs .... 


, 


$21.61 




Repairing heating apparatus 


. 


16.97 




Removing night soil 


• 


8.00 


46 58 




Cummings. 




^t V^ •<-/ v-' 


Repairs .... 


. 


$112.86 




Furniture . . . 


. 


21.33 




Repairing heating apparatus 


. 


102.11 




Insurance 


• 


202.50 


438 80 




Davis. 




\^ t/ *_/ • V_/ \/ 


Repairs .... 


. 


■ $203.77 




Furniture 


. 


10.18 




Repairing furniture 


. 


88.50 




Repairing heating apparatus 


. 


24.32 




Insurance 


^ ^ 


202.50 






f . 




529 27 






%J ^d %J m^ • 


A?nount carried forwarc 


$4,304.00 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OX PUBLIC PROPERTY. 



535 



Amount brought forward . 


• 


84,304.00 


Durell. 






Repairs ...... 


$ 23.80 




Improvements .... 


89.30 




Furniture ..... 


65.42 




Insurance ..... 


loO'.OO 




Setting edgestones .... 


88.34 


416 86 


Edgerly. 




Tt X V •(J W 


Repairs ...... 


S197.88 




Improvements .... 


135.00 




Furniture ..... 


173.00 




Repairing furniture 


14.90 




Repairing heating apparatus 


60.48 


5jsl ^G 


Forster. 




^*J L % i^\J 


Repairs ...... 


S539.56 




Furniture ..... 


20.40 




Repairing furniture 


2.50 




Blackboards ..... 


50.25 




Repairing heating apparatus 


240.80 




Insurance ..... 


50.00 


003 51 


Frank Im. 




tj \J fj 9%J X. 


Repairs ...... 


S551.69 




Repairing heating apparatus 


111.73 




Furniture ..... 


11.68 




Removing night soil 


12.00 


687 10 


G lines. 




\JO 1 . i V/ 


Repairs 


S145.12 




Improvements .... 


39.00 




Furniture ..... 


51.53 




Repairing heating apparatus 


61.80 


297 4o 






u 'J 1 .ri»y 


Amount carried forward . 


87,190.18 



536 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Amount bt'oiight forward . 

Harvard. 
Repairs ...... 

Repairing heating apparatus 
Removing night soil 



$ (3.13 
11.05 

8.00 





High. 




Repairs . . . 




$1,593.78 


Improvements 




257.40 


Furniture 




225.70 


Repairing furniture 




7.10 


Blackboards . 




78.88 


Insurance 


Highland. 


650.00 






Repairs .... 




$218.12 


Furniture 




338.13 


Repairing furniture 




13.38 


Repairing heating apparatus 




28.10 


Laying concrete in yard . 


Jackson. 


243.00 






Repairs .... 


. 


$229.64 


Improvements 


. 


404.99 


Furniturel 


. 


25.33 


Repairing furniture 


. 


5.50 


Repairing heating apparatus 


0. S. Knapp. 


47.40 




• 


Repairs .... 


. 


$194.42 


Furniture 


. 


10.11 


Repairing heating apparatus 


. 


184.34 


Insurance 


' 


450.00 



$7,190.18 



25.18 



2,812.86 



840.73 



712.86 



Amount carried forward 



838.87 



$12,420.68 



REPORT OF THE COIVLMITTEE OX PUBLIC PROPERTY 



537 



Amount brought foi'ward . 



812,420.68 



Repairs . 
Furniture 
Repairing furniture 



Repairs .... 
Furniture 

Repairing furniture 
Repairing heating apparatus 
Concrete around building 



Repairs .... 
Repairing heating apparatus 



Repairs . 

Furniture 

Repairing furniture 

Repairing heating apparatus 

Insurance 



Repairs .... 
Repairing heating apparatus 
Insurance 



Lincoln. 



Morse. 



Pope. 



Sp?ing Hilt. 



Repairs . . . . 

Amount ca rried fo riva rd . 



$222.71 
5.00 

57.40 



§424.33 

49.83 

5.00 

112.38 

225.00 



8108.26 
124.23 



Pi-escott. 






8211.1)7 




35.12 




94.83 


. 


8.86 




50.00 


Prospect Hill. 




. 


883.15 


. 


32.97 


• 


56.94 



285.11 



816.54 



232.49 



400.78 



173.06 



.60 



814,329.26 



Anioimt brought forward . 


• 


$14,329.26 


Webster. 






Repairs . . ... 


$26.75 




Removing furniture, furnace, etc. 


44.00 




Adjusting insurance 


22.50 


Qfl ^n 



Superintendent of Schools^ Office. 

Rent (11 months, to Nov. 30) . $275.00 

Heat 50.00 

Repairing furniture . . . 9.75 



School supplies (brushes, dusters, 

baskets, etc.) . 
Books and printing 
Care of church for school purposes 
Carriage hire .... 
Incidentals .... 

Transfer to Police Station Incidentals 
account . . . . . 

Total debit (as above) . 



$269.55 
15.00 
25.00 
32.50 
23.08 



334.75 



;14,757.26 



365.13 

600.00 
.5,722.39 



SCHOOLHOUSE, ENGLISH HIGH, ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 
Balance unexpended December 31, 



1893 

Debit. 
Expenditures : — 

Walter S. Sampson, on account 

contract .... 

Walter S. Sampson, extra work . 

Amounts carried forward . 



$81,482.00 



$40,000.00 
1,893.40 



$41,893.40 $81,482.00 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY. 



539 



Amounts brought forward . $41,893.40 $81,482.00 

Hartwell & Richardson, archi- 
tect's services . . . 1,000.00 

J. F. Bubert, contract for electric 

wiring ..... 500.00 

Labor (heating building) . . 254.75 

Water service .... 174.18 

Referees' services on finish of 

woodwork .... 150.00 

Sewer assessment . . . 138.00 

Insurance .... 75.00 

Total expenditures .... 44,185.33 

Balance unexpended . . . . $37,296.67 



SCHOOLHOUSE, HIGH AND ENGLISH HIGH, HEATING, 
VENTILATING AND PLUMBING, ACCOUNT. 



Credit. 



Appropriated in 1894 



$35,000.00 



Debit. 

Expenditures : — 

A. A. Sanborn, on account con- 
tract for heating . . . $20,000.00 

A. A. Sanborn, extra work . 2,811.74 

James Tucker & Sons, on account 

contract for plumbing . . 1,700.00 

James Tucker & Sons, extra work 740.99 

Walter S. Sampson, extra mason 

and carpenter work . . 714.94 

Air shaft and mason work . 1,235.08 

Carpentering .... 183.48 

Plastering .... 211.73 

Amounts carried forward . . $27,597.96 



15,000.00 



540 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amounts brought forward 


$27 


,597.96 


$35,000.00 


Wire lathing, asbestos packing, 








etc. . . . . . 




60.07 




Wire guards ... 




23.20 




Water . . . . . 




56.40 




Gas ..... 




17.28 




Incidentals .... 




42.37 




Total expenditures 


• 


• 


27,797.28 


Balance unexpended 


$7,202.72 



SCHOOLHOUSE IN WARD FOUR, SOUTH SIDE 
FITCHBURG RAILROAD, ACCOUNT. 

(George W. Durell School.) 

Credit. 

Balance unexpended December 31, 

1893 $ 4,244.61 

Appropriation in 1894 . . . 12,000.00 

Total credit $16,244.61 

Debit. 
Expenditures : — 

F. G. Coburn & Co., on account 

contract .... $12,065.00 

F. G. Coburn & Co., extra work 1,091.83 

A. A. Sanborn, on account con- 
tract for heating . . . 1,000.00 

Samuel D. Kelley, architect's ser- 
vices ..... 750.00 

Furniture .... 780.50 

Insurance .... 7.50 

Blackboards .... 270.75 

Amounts carried forward . $15,965.58 $16,244.61 



REPORT OF THE COM^vIlTTEE OX PUBLIC PROPERTY. 



541 



Amounts brought forward 


%\h 


,965.58 


816/244.61 


Lumber .... 




84.82 




Carpentering . 




68.26 




Labor on furniture . 




48.75 




Incidentals 




27.69 





Total expenditures 
Balance unexpended 



16,190.10 



854.51 



SCHOOLHOUSE, EDGERLY ADDITION, ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 
Balance unexpended December 81, 



1893 


$456.67 


Appropriated in 1894 


2,000.00 


Total credit . 


• 


Debit. 




Expenditures : — 




Smith Heating and Ventilating 




- Company, on account contract 


81,696.50 


Mason work .... 


44.95 


Asbestos ..... 


50.50 


Lumber ..... 


45.24 



Total expenditures 
Balance unexpended 



82,456.67 



1,837.19 



8619.48 



SCHOOLHOUSE, BINGHAM ADDITION, ACCOUNT. 

Credit. 
Balance unexpended December 31, 

1893 $8,290.00 

Appropriated in 1894 . . 1,000.00 



Total credit . 

Amount cari'ied forward 
(34) 



§9,290.00 

89,290.00 



542 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount brought forward . 

Debit 
Expenditures : — 

John Kelley, on account contract 
John Kelley, extra work . 
A. A. Sanborn, on account con- 
tract for heating 
Plumbing 
Carpentering 
Asbestos . 
Furniture 

Repairing furniture 
Moving furniture 
Concreting 

Total expenditures 

Balance unexpended 



$9,290.00 



;4,482.11 
360.88 

3,635.84 
75.00 
8.40 
75.33 
411.92 
25.75 
36.24 
95.40 



9,206.87 
$83.13 



SCHOOLHOUSE, O. S. KNAPP ADDITION, ACCOUNT. 



Credit. 



Appropriation 



Debit. 
Expenditures : — 

John Kelley, on account contract. $9,750.00 

John Kelley, extra work . . 568.10 
Braman, Dow & Co., on account 

contract for heating . . 1,000.00 
Loring & Phipps, architect's ser- 
vices 325.00 

Plumbing .... 14.95 

Gas fitting . . . . 18.10 

Plastering .... 4.25 

Grading 8.00 

Amounts carried forward . $11,688.40 



$15,500.00 



$15,500.00 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY. 543 

$15,500.00 



Amounts brought forward 
Furniture .... 

Labor on furniture . 
Gas ..... 

Insurance .... 

Total expenditures 

Balance unexpended 



$11,688.40 

804.43 

67.50 

23.13 

40.00 



12,623.46 

S2,876.54 



SCHOOL CONTINGENT ACCOUNT. 

(Janitors' Salaries.) 

Credit. 



Appropriation 



Debit. 



Expenditures : — 

For salaries paid janitors . 

Balance unexpended 



$11,000.00 



10,686.13 



S313.87 



EXPENDITURES BY THIS COMMITTEE FROM MISCEL- 
LANEOUS ACCOUNT. 



City Hall expenses : — 




For electric lighting- 


S275.00 


gas . 


22.27 


fuel 


183.00 


water 


22.00 


ice .... 


35.00 


telephone connections 


176.90 


furniture . 


85.83 


repairing furniture 


30.87 


repairs of building 


157.34 


Amount c a rried forward . 


8988.21 



544 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Amount bj'oitght foi'ward . 


$988.21 


supplies . . . . 


40.62 


rent of P. 0. box 


4.00 


express on bundles 


11.90 


teaming ashes 


16.00 


labor . • . . . 


47.50 



City messengers' team : — 

For maintenance 
City engineers' team : — 

For maintenance 
Election expenses-: — 

For fitting up voting precincts, 

repairs of boxes, fittings, etc. 

Care of rooms for elections and 

caucuses .... 

Rent of rooms for elections and 

caucuses .... 



Moving band stand 



Incidentals 



Total expenditures 



;301.47 

109.00 

85.00 



11,108.23 
606.40 
270.00 





495.47 




20.30 




12.50 


$2 


,512.90 



Under a contract made with Walter S. Sampson in 1893 (reported 
in the annual report of the committee of last year), work has been 
advanced as rapidly as possible on the English High School building, 
and the building will probably be completed early in the Spring of 
1895. The committee understands, however, that it is the intention 
of the School Board not to occupy the building for English High 
School purposes until the commencement of the school year of 
1895-96. By authority of orders dated July 11 and August 27, 
Tespectively, contracts were made with James Tucker Sz: Sons for 
$3,137 for plumbing, and with J. F. Bubert for $1,530 for electric 
wiring in this buildmg. 

In pursuance of an order dated May 9, a contract was made with 
A. A. Sanborn for the heating and ventilating apparatus for the High 
and Enghsh High School buildings for the sum of $26,306. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC PROPERTY. 545 

In pursuance of authority conferred on this committee by an order 
dated February 28, 1894, the church building on Highland avenue 
was sold to the First Congregational Society in Somerville for the sum 
of $400, said building to be removed on or before August 1, 1894. 
The time for removal of the church building was extended by 
authority of the City Council to November 5, 1894, and further 
extended to March 1, 1895, by which date the building is to be 
entirely removed. 

As reported by the committee of 1893, proposals were received 
for the construction and for the heating and ventilating apparatus for 
the schoolhouse in Ward Four, south side of Fitchburg Railroad. 
Under authority of orders dated February 28 and April 11, contracts 
were made with Frank G. Coburn Sz Co. for the sum of 812,065, and 
with A. A. Sanborn for the sum of $1,689, — the first for construction, 
and the latter for heating and ventilating apparatus, — the committee of 
1893 having recommended that contracts be made with said parties, 
they being the lowest bidders. By an order dated March 28, this 
school was named the " George W. Durell School." The building was 
completed during the Summer, and has been used for school purposes 
since the beginning of the Fall term. 

In pursuance of an order dated June 13, a contract was made with 
the Smith Heating and Ventilating Co. for changing the system 
of heating and ventilating apparatus in the Edgerly Schoolhouse, from 
furnace to steam ; the amount to be paid for the same to be 82,262, 
in which sum is included the sum of $597, being the final payment on 
account of the former contract with said company. The change has 
been made under said contract, but in the judgment of the committee 
the results are not in accordance with the contract, and the apparatus 
has not as yet been accepted. 

The Bingham Schoolhouse addition, which was commenced by the 
committee of 1893, was completed early in the year, and is now in use 
for school purposes. 

During the year the O. S. Knapp Schoolhouse has been enlarged 
by the addition of four rooms, in accordance with plans prepared by 
Loring and Phipps, architects. By authority of orders dated May 23 
and June 13, contracts were made with John Kelley for construction 
for the sum of $13,000, and with Braman, Dow & Co. for heating 
and ventilating apparatus for the sum of $1,600. This building 



546 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

will be ready for occupancy at the beginning of the Spring term of 
1895. 

In pursuance of an order dated April 25, extensive alterations 
have been made in the basement of the police building. Six addi- 
tional cells have been constructed, a room prepared for the use of the 
matron, and a battery and work room fitted for use in the operation of 
the police-signal system. 

In the report of the Superintendent of Public Buildings may be 
found a detailed statement of repairs and improvements of the school- 
houses and public buildings under the care of this committee. 

For the Committee, 

JOHN ANDREWS, Chairman. 
WILLIAM P. MITCHELL, Clerk. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. Sent 

down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of Inspector of Buildings, 
January 1, 1895. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Ciiy Council : — 



Gentlemen, — In accordance with city ordinance the following 
report of this department for the year ending December 31, 1894, is 
respectfully submitted. 

The number of building permits issued during the year was 513, 
classified as follows : — 







WARDS. 




'AL. 




1 


2 


3 


4 


O 


Single dwellings .... 


17 


47 • 


128 


126 


318 


Dwellings in blocks 




6 


3 


8 


17 


Apartment houses .... 
Additions and alterations to buildings 


14 


3 
24 


1 
19 


11 


4 
68 


Stablds 


5 


16 


16 


12 


49 


Stores ...... 


5 


5 


20 


9 


39 


Shops ...... 

Sheds ...... 


2 


2 
2 


3 


1 


8 
2 


Dry House ..... 
Churches ..... 




1 


1 


1 


1 
2 


Manufactories ..... 






1 


1 


2 


Laundry ....... 

Business block (brick) 




1 




1 


1 
1 


Office 




1 






1 




43 


18 


192 


17 


513 



Frequent examinations have been made of buildings in the course 
of construction and those upon which alterations have been made. 



550 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Notices have been sent to owners and builders in cases where faulty 
construction, violation of ordinance, or danger from fire was dis- 
covered, and in all cases, owners and builders have acceded to re- 
quests or notices sent, and cheerfully complied with the suggestions of 
the Inspector. 

Special attention has been given to the following cases : 



Building in a dangerous and unsafe condition 

Woodwork too near chimney . 

Cellar walls improperly constructed (rebuilt) 

Boiler setting and chimney unsafe 

Woodwork against furnace pipe 

Brick wall ordered between buildings . 

Brick party wall improperly built (ordinance violated) 

Chimney resting on iron columns . . . , 



1 
10 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 



The number of city buildings built or additions made thereto is 

as follows : — 



City stables (built) 


. 1 


Fire houses (built) ..... 


. 2 


Schoolhouses (built) • . . . 


1 


Schoolhouses (now building) 


. 1 


Schoolhouses (additions) .... 


. 2 



The average dwelling of to-day is being built in a more thorough 
manner than that of a few years ago, which means progress and sta- 
bility. I would recommend a change in the Building Ordinance, 
requiring girts instead of ledger boards for the support of floor 
beams. 

Under an Act of the Legislature approved June 10, 1893, requir- 
ing the Inspector of Buildings to make an appointment of an Inspec- 
tor of Plumbing, the Inspector appointed Duncan C. Greene, on May 2, 
1894, for the probationary term of six months, in accordance with the 
Civil Service rules, and Mr. Greene at once entered upon his duties. 
On'November 3, 1894, his appointment was made permanent, and he 
will be continued in office under the law until he resigns or otherwise 
vacates his office, or is removed for cause. Previous to the appoint- 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 551 

ment of Mr. Greene, Mr. Gustavus F. Andrews acted as Inspector of 
Plumbing, he having been appointed by me and approved by the 
Board of Health. 

The laws further require the Inspector to act as one of the Board 
of Examiners of plumbers making application for licenses, to examine 
all plans for which plumbing permits are to be issued, grant certificates 
and permits to do plumbing, and also to fix the amount of compen- 
sation of the Inspector of Plumbing. After consultation with the 
Finance Committee of the City Council, your Inspector fixed his pay 
at $100 per month. 

The total number of permits for plumbing was six hundred "and 
fifty-two, covering six hundred and forty-six buildings. 

Permits for plumbing in new buildings . . 341 

Permits for plumbing in old buildings . . . 311 

The Inspector of Plumbing reports that six hundred and twenty- 
five buildings for which permits to do plumbing were issued, have 
been inspected with the following results : — 

Number of buildings where the pipes were tested with 

water ........ 523 

Number of buildings with defective pipe or fittings 71 

Faulty construction of waste or vent system . . 49 



Faulty connection with drain 
Insufficient number of clean-outs . 
Vent pipes not carried through the roof 
Insufficient number of traps . 



11 

33 

8 

26 



These violations were pointed out to the plumbers having charge of 
the work, and the plumbing was reconstructed in accordance w^th the 
provisions of the plumbing ordinance. The Inspector has kept him- 
self informed of the condition of the plumbing as the buildings have 
progressed, and as necessity required, given directions how the work 
should be done. 

The following is the total number of licenses and certificates issued 
to plumbers during the year, under the Acts of 1893 and 1894, and 
receipts for the same paid to the city Treasurer : — 



552 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Number of master plumbers' certificates issued 18 Receipts $36.00 
^' journeymen '' '' 

" master '' licenses 

" journeymen '• " 



40 




a 


20.00 


'' 15 




a 


30.00 


11 




a 


5.50 


• 


. $91.50 


uses rejec 


ted 




. 2 


i( 






. 2 



Total receipts 

Applications for master plumbers' licenses rejected 

'' journeymen " 

Applicants for journeymen plumbers' licenses not ap- 
pearing for examination ...... 4 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS R. ROULSTONE, 

Inspector of Buildings. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC 
BUILDINGS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



I 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of Superintendent of Public Buildings, ) 

January 1, 1895. | 

To THE Honorable, the Mayor and the City Council : — 

Gentlemen, — In compliance with city ordinance No. nineteen, 
section eight, this report is respectfully submitted. Repairs, altera- 
tions, and improvements have been made at the Police building, City 
Hall, and the several schoolhouses of the city. The following is a 
brief summary of the nature of such repairs, etc. : — 

Police Station. — Six cells have been constructed in the basement, 
a battery room built and fitted with shelves for the jars, and conven- 
iences for filling and cleaning the battery. The room formerly used 
as a battery room was fitted for the matron's use. K storage room has 
been fitted, room for supplies built, and a main trap placed in the 
drain outside the building. The room used by the clerk of the court 
was enlarged, newly plastered, new hardwood floor laid, cases built 
for books and papers, etc. 

City Hall, — Slight repairs have been made, such as shellacing 
floors, new window cords, etc. 

Beech Street School. — The old sanitary building in the yard has 
been removed ; seats and desks in one room replaced by those of a 
larger size, taken from the Franklin School ; hall was repapered. 

Luther V. Bell School. — All the room and hall ceilings have been 
whitened, and the walls painted ; dressmg rooms ventilated by open- 
ings cut into the hall ; one half the desks and seats in two of the 
rooms removed to the Franklin School, and new desks and seats of the 
adjustable pattern furnished ; seats and desks in four rooms redressed 
and varnished j all the basement windows screened, and additional 
concrete laid in the yard. 



556 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Bennett School. — New plank walks have been laid, and repairs 
made in the janitor's quarters. 

Bingham School. — An addition of four rooms has been completed, 
and was first occupied in April. The boys' sanitaries have been en- 
larged and new sanitaries for the girls built in the east side of the 
basement, with an entrance from the yard. In the old part of the 
building, the walls and ceilings of the halls and rooms have been 
painted and whitened, and the furniture refinished and varnished. 
The fence in front of the building has been moved back to conform 
with the line of the street. 

Burns School. — The boiler has been retubed and the fire-box re- 
paired, and platforms built in front of blackboards. 

Cedar Street School. — Slight repairs have been made to building, 
walks, etc. 

Cunimings School. — Rooms have been whitened, and general 
repairs made to building. 

Davis School. — The ceiling of the furnace room has been 
plastered ; chimney topped out, and alterations made in the flues, im- 
proving the draft ; desks and chairs in all the rooms refinished and 
varnished. 

George W. Ditrell School. — This is a four-room brick building 
heated by direct and indirect steam. It has been erected during the 
year, and was occupied in September. A flagstaff has been placed on 
the building, walks laid, and two hundred feet of fence built. 

Edgerly School. — The old furnaces have been removed and a 
steam heating plant substituted, designed to heat the building by 
direct and indirect steam. Slight repairs have been made to doors, 
windows, etc. 

Fo7'ster School. — Walls and ceilings in four rooms have been 
whitened and painted ; one heating boiler retubed ; case for books 
built in Principal's office ; slate blackboards put in two of the upper 
rooms ; furniture in one room redressed and varnished. 

Franklin School. — Ceilings have been replastered ; inside wood- 
work and walls painted ; platforms removed, and the furniture 
removed from the Bell School put into one of the rooms on the second 
floor. 

Jacob T. Glines School. — An iron gate has been placed at the 
entrance to the ward-room, and slight repairs have been made to the 
roof. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 00/ 

Harvard School, — Slight repairs have been made to the out-build- 
ings and walks. 

High School. — The heating and ventilating system in this building 
has been entirely remodelled. The two old boilers have been replaced 
by three of a larger capacity, designed to heat the new English High 
School as well as the old building. By the alteration, drains were cut 
off, making it necessary to build new ones, and also to place conduc- 
tors on the outside of the building. 2^Iost of the plumbing had to be 
taken out and replaced at quite an expense, but nothing has been 
done to improve the sanitaries. In addition to the work done by 
contract, the city constructed the cold air ducts and heating ducts in 
the chemical room and placed a radiator m the upper hall. Slate 
blackboards have been put in the recitation rooms. 

Highland School. — One room was fitted with new furniture, the old 
being too small ; one room has been painted and whitened, and addi- 
tional concrete laid in the yard. 

Jackso7i School. — The old sanitaries have been removed, and new 
ones constructed in the basement, and a portion of the yard has been 
graded. 

O. S. Knapp School. — An addition to this building of four school- 
rooms and a ward-room has been completed during the year. This 
part of the building is heated independently from the old part by 
direct and indirect steam from one boiler. The old portion of the 
building needs extensive repairs. 

Lincobi School. — The walls of the rooms were painted ; new tin 
put on roofs of porches ; desks and chairs redressed and varnished. 

Morse School. — All the outside woodwork and tin roofs have been 
painted two coats ; a portion of the boys' yard concreted ; walls of 
dressing room and office painted. 

Charles G. Pope School. — Slight repairs have been made to the 
roof and plumbing. 

Prescoit School. — The furniture in four rooms was redressed and 
varnished, and dressing rooms painted. 

Prospect Hill School. — This building has had but slight repairs. 

Spring Hill School. — This building has not been in use for school 
purposes, but has been used for storage of old school furniture. 

Webster School. — This building was destroyed by fire during the 
year 1893. What remained of the old building was sold. 
(35) 



558 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

The usual repairs have been made to out-houses, walks, fences 
steps, floors, sanitaries, plumbing, furniture, blackboards, furnaces 
stoves, boilers, clocks, doors, windows, roofs, drains, electrical ap- 
paratus, etc. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOS. R. ROULSTONE, 

Supe7"intendent of Public Buildings. 



■ \ 



REPORT 



OF THE 



INSPECTOR OF MILK. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January i6, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



Reference concurred in. 



In Common Council, January 16, 1895. 
CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the Inspector of Milk, ) 
January 8, 1895. j 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Council : — 

Honored Sirs, — Respectfully I submit to you the following brief 
report of the work of milk inspection, and the giving of licenses for 
the past year. 

I have licensed as milk producers, contractors and sellers, two 
hundred and twenty-six men. These men handle daily nine thousand 
and fifty-nine cans of milk. There are also owned by the various 
dealers, five hundred and twenty-eight cows. There are one hundred 
and eighty-one wagons running almost constantly through the city, for 
the purpose of distributing milk. 

I have registered this past year thirty-three new stores. There are 
now in the city, four hundred and sixty-two stores where milk is sold. 
I have also licensed seventeen men, with wagons, to sell oleomargarine 
and other imitations of butter. Total number of milk and oleomarga- 
rine licenses, and store registers, equals two hundred and seventy-six. 
Therefore, at fifty cents each, one hundred and thirty-eight dollars 
have been turned into the city treasury, for which I have the city 
treasurer's receipts. 

I have examined and tested, during the year, the usual number of 
samples of milk, and found them to compare favorably with those of 
previous years. Hence there have been no causes for prosecution. 

Trusting, gentlemen, that this report will meet with your approval, 
I remain respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

THOMAS CUNNINGHAM, 

Inspector of Milk. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND 
PROVISIONS. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January i6, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. Sent 
down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



Reference concurred in. 



In Common Council, January 16, 1895. 
CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the Inspector of Animals and Provisions, ] 

January 8, 1895. j 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Council : — 

Honored Sirs, — In the month of October I made the usual semi- 
annual tour of inspection of all the cattle in the City of Somerville. 
There are one hundred and twenty-one owners of the same. Total 
number of cattle, four hundred and twenty. There are three hund- 
red and ninety-seven cows in milk, twelve cows dry, two bulls, and 
nine young stock. From a physical examination all appeared to 
be in a very good and healthy condition. At the April examination, 
some eight or ten were slightly unwell from various temporary causes. 
In October all had recovered. With this sole exception, the report 
and examination for April do not differ from the same for October. 
There are in the city two establishments where cattle are 
slaughtered. The largest one, " The New England Dressed Meat and 
Wool Company," is located on Medford street. At this place, in 
August and. September, four hundred and fifty-eight cattle were 
slaughtered, all in good order ; also three thousand, five hundred and 
fifty-nine calves were killed, only nine of which were condemned as 
unfit for use. In October, two hundred and fifty-four cattle, and three 
thousand, three hundred and seventy-two calves were killed, none of 
which were condemned. Since October, until December 31, four 
hundred and twenty cattle, and three thousand, three hundred and 
forty-six calves have been killed. Of these last, two cattle and eight 
calves were condemned and consigned to the tank. Total number of 
cattle killed since August equals one thousand, one hundred and thirty- 
two, only two of which were unfit for market. Total number of calves 
killed since August equals ten thousand, two hundred and seventy- 



566 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



seven, only seventeen of which were two young and consequently unfit 
for market. 

Since August this firm have been engaged in transporting cattle and 
sheep to Europe. During four months they have shipped thirteen 
thousand cattle, and thirty-eight thousand, one hundred and forty-two 
sheep. These animals are all inspected before leaving the West, by a 
United States Inspector, and again, on arrival here, they are inspected 
by a United States Inspector. All the animals that are injured on the 
trip are considered unfit to be shipped. These are retained by the 
firm, and are slaughtered for market. 

All the cattle and calves slaughtered, I am required by the '' State 
Board of Cattle Commissioners " to examine. 

Hartz Gunsenheiser, of North street, owns a small slaughtering 
establishment which has been duly licensed. He has killed during 
the year, on an average, about twenty-four cattle and sixty calves per 
month ; also sheep in proportion. This place is kept clean and in 
good order. Gunsenheiser kills mostly for the Jewish population of 
Boston and vicinity. 

I have, during the year,, visited about two hundred stores and 
markets for groceries and provisions, also fish wagons, and have found 
that everything for sale has been all right and fit for use. 

This condensed report will give you some idea of the duties re- 
quired of your inspector. I sincerely hope, gentlemen, that it will 
meet with your approbation. 

Very respectfully, 



THOMAS CUNNINGHAM, 

Inspector of Animals and Provisions. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF ELECTRIC 

LINES. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldrmen, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to the Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In CoMisiON Council, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to the Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of Superintendent of Electric Lines and Lights, 

City Hall, January 1, 1895. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Cit\^ Council : — 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to herewith submit the annual 
report of the department for the inspection of wires. 

In April, 1804, a heavy sleet storm took down a line of fifty-two 
round poles on Highland avenue, from Central street to Davis square, 
eleven on Broadway, from Lincoln School to Arlington line, nineteen 
on Mystic avenue, and eleven on Linwood street. All of these poles 
were owned by the New England Telephone Co. These lines were 
soon rebuilt, the round poles being replaced by square hard pine poles, 
and joint locations being given to the Telephone Co., the Electric 
Light Co., and the West End Street Railway Co. as far as practicable. 

The Commercial Union Telegraph Co. have rebuilt their line on 
Mystic avenue, having been granted locations jointly with the Somer- 
ville Electric Light Co. Square hard pine poles have been substituted 
for inferior round poles on the following streets, joint locations being 
given where it was possible to do so, — Summer street, from Belmont 
street to Cutter square. Orchard street, Willow avenue, and Dover 
street. 

The new English High School, the Central Fire Station, and 
Ladder Two House have been wired for electric lighting, and the last 
two houses connected with the bridge metallic telephone line which 
is used for direct communication between the different departments of 
the city. 

A number of private residences and stores have been inspected for 
electric wiring, and a large number of dead wires have been removed 
throughout the city. 



570 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



FIRE ALARM AND POLICE. 

The fire alarm has been transferred from the old engine house on 
Highland avenue to the Central Fire Station, the entire upper floor 
being devoted to electrical apartments. A large battery room, capable 
of holding one thousand jars, provides for the future growth of the 
city and affords a relief from the crowded condition that existed in the 
old building. A new eight-circuit repeater with two bell circuits com- 
bined has been put in. The circuits have been increased from three 
to seven, thus affording a better protection to the city. Formerly, if a 
break occurred, one third of the city was left unprotected until the 
trouble on the line could be remedied ; now, by the running of seven- 
teen additional miles of wire, the arrangement of boxes and lessening 
of territory covered by each circuit, but a small portion is left unpro- 
tected during a break or trouble on the line. 

All of the fire-alarm circuit, tapper and telephone lines enter the 
building through a cable of thirty conductors. 

A bell of three thousand pounds has been placed on the new Cen- 
tral Fire Station, also one of two thousand, one hundred and eighty 
pounds on Hook and Ladder Two House, Highland avenue. Five 
new fire-alarm boxes have been put in circuit during the year. The 
fire alarm is one of the best in the State. 

Needs of the fire alarm : New boxes in the isolated parts of the 
city. A striker to take the place of the bell formerly on the Unitarian 
church. Central Hill ; either the old or the new High School would be 
a good location for such a striker. A striker on Clarendon Hill, and 
also one at Winter Hill. A horse and wagon for use in repairing breaks, 
conveying material for general work on the fire and police wires, and 
dispatch in reaching trouble on the line is much needed. There is 
ample room for this team at the Central Fire Station. 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 
List of Boxes witk their Numbers and Locations. 

12. Junction Somerville avenue and Linwood street. 

13. McLean Asylum. 




REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF ELECTRIC LINES. 571 

14. Cross street, corner of Oilman street. 

15. Washington street, corner of Myrtle street. 

16. Webster street (Hose House No. 1). 

17. Lincoln street, corner of Perkins street. 

18. Broadway, corner of Mt. Vernon street. 

19. Medford street, corner of Washington street. 

112. John P. Squire & Co.'s, Somerville avenue. 

113. F. R. R. Freight Yard. 

115. Franklin street, opposite Oliver street. 

116. Broadway, near Autumn street. 

118. Boston & Maine R. R. car shops, near Prison Point. 

119. Corner of Somerville avenue and Medford street. 
21. Medford street, corner of South street. 

23. South street, Howe 6: Putney (Pork House). 

24. Webster avenue, opposite Norfolk street. 

25. Washington street, corner of Prospect street (Hose House 

No. 3). 

26. Concord square, corner of Springfield street. 

27. Bow street (Police Station). 

28. Somerville avenue, corner of Laurel street. 

29. Washington street, opposite Dane street. 

216. Highland avenue, corner Vinal avenue. 

217. Summer street, corner of School street. 

221. North Packing and Provision Co.'s, Medford street. 

224. Prospect street, near Oak street. 

225. Union square, Masonic Building. 

227. American Tube Works, Frost avenue. 

228. Middlesex Bleachery, Somerville avenue. 
231. Boston street, corner of Greenville street. 

31. Central Fire Station, Medford street, junction Highland avenue. 

32. Bonair street, opposite Dana street. 

33. Medford street, corner Dartmouth street. 

34. Marshall street (Hose House No. 2). 

35. Broadway, junction of Main street. 

36. Central street, corner of Vernon street. 

37. Magoun square. 

38. Cedar street, corner of Clyde street. 
331. Oilman square. 



572 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

332. Pearl street, corner of Aldrich street. 

334. Wheatland street, corner of Jaques street. 

335. Melrose street, off Mystic avenue. 
4. Powder House square. 

41. Summer street, corner of Cedar street. 

42. Beacon street, corner of Kent street. 

43. Beacon street, corner of Harris street. 

45. Summer street, opposite Spring street. 

46. Elm street, junction Somerville avenue. 

46. Duplicate : Hose House No. 5. 

47. Highland avenue, corner of Grove street (Engine House 

No. 4). 

48. Broadway, corner of Curtis street. 

49. College Hill (Professors' Row). 

421. Highland avenue, corner of Central street. 

423. City Hospital, Crocker street. 

423. Duplicate : Ladder House No. 2, Highland avenue. 

441. Gorham street, corner Howard street. 

442. Holland street, opposite Irving street. 

443. Davis square. 

45. Meacham street, corner Campbell park. 
447. Elm street, corner of William street. 
55. No School. 
6-6-6. Police Call. 
7-7-7. Military Call. 
5 Blows. Second engine call. 
8 Blows. Extra ladder truck call. ■ 

The battery room at the Police Station has been moved from the 
front of the building to the rear, and new battery racks have been 
erected. Three additional boxes have been placed in circuit, and the 
wires of the Police system have with few exceptions been placed 
above all other wires throughout the city. 

I would recommend the running of a third wire for the fourth 

circuit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LEIGHTON W. MANNING, 

Superintendent Electric Lines. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND 
MEASURES. 



(36) 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 30, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of Sealer of Weights axd Measures, 
151 Central Street, January 29, 1895. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the City Col'ncil : — 

Gentlemen, — The following is respectfully submitted as the first 
annual report of the Sealer of Weights and Measures, and is for the 
year ending December 31, 1894. 

Number of Weights, Measures, axd Balances Tested and Sealed. 
Scales ........ 630 



Weights 
Dry measures 
Wet measures 
Milk cans 
Milk jars 
Cream jars . 
Oil cans 
Coal baskets 
Yard sticks . 



1,904 

676 

623 

978 

36 

647 

4 

30 

1 



Number of Measures Tested and Contdemned 



Dry measures 
Wet measures 
Coal baskets 



43 
20 
12 



Several of the scales were adjusted before sealing, and many of the 
weights were first drilled and plugged with lead. 

Eleven scales were in need of repair and were tagged, as required 
by law, with a card stating that they were inaccurate and not to be 
used until sealed, and the card removed by the sealer : such removal 



576 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

not to be made by any other person, and the scales not to be used 
contrary to such provision, under penalty. Nine of these scales were 
subsequently submitted to the inspection of the sealer, and were tested 
and sealed ; one has not been used since tagged, and the owner of 
the other has not as yet communicated with the sealer in regard to it. 

The sealer is required by law to give public notice, annually, by ad- 
vertisement or posting, to all persons doing business to bring in their 
weights, measures and balances to be sealed. This provision has been 
complied with each year, and such weights, measures and balances as 
have been brought to the sealer have been adjusted, sealed and 
recorded. 

f^ The law also provides that '* After giving such notice the said sealer 
shall go to the houses, stores and shops of persons who neglect to 
comply therewith^ and, having entered the same with the assent of the 
occupants thereof, shall adjust and seal their weights, measures and 
balances." 

Until the past year this law has not been observed in Somerville, 
because the sealer has not been furnished, as required by another 
statute, with the necessary set of standard weights, measures and 
balances to enable him to carry out its provisions ; the only set there- 
tofore owned by the city being the one kept, as the statutes provide, in 
the custody of the city treasurer. 

In July last, the sealer was provided with everything requisite for 
the full performance of his duties, and he has since made as complete 
an inspection of the various places of business and houses which he is 
required to visit, as was possible on a first inspection. 

The receipts and expenses for the year were as follows : — 

Fees collected and paid to city treasurer . $192.28 



Expenses, — permanent equipment . 
man and team 
stamps, and re-cutting same 
bill-books and tags 
sundries (labor, etc.) . 



S51.70 

63.25 

5.90 

9.75 

4.92 



$135.52 



Sealer's salary $100.00 

Respectfully, 

AMMIEL COLMAN, 
Sealer of Weights and Measu7'es, 



I 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY SOLICITOR 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, February 27, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



Concurred in. 



In Common Council, February 28, 1895. 



CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



February 27, 1895. 

To THE Honorable, the Mayor axd Citt Council : — 

I respectfully submit my report as city solicitor for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1894. 

The following were the cases pending in the courts during the 
year 1894, in which the City of Somerville was a party, and, so far as 
disposed of, they were disposed of as hereinafter stated : — 

1. Parker vs. Somerville — Before County Commissioners of 
Middlesex County. Damages on account of land alleged to have 
been taken for a sewer by the city. 

2. Squire vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Damages for conversion of box drain. Dismissed Decem- 
ber 17, 1894. 

3. Boston &= Lowell R. R. Co. vs. Somerville — Before Superior 
Court for Middlesex County. Petition in regard to repairs and recon- 
struction of bridges across raibroad location in Somerville, and assess- 
ment of expenses thereof. 

4. Philbrook vs. Somerville — Before United States Circuit Court. 
Action for damages for alleged violation of the Knibbs patent for a 
relief valve on steam fire engines. This action was commenced May 
20, 1887, and similar actions were brought against other cities. 
Somerville and other defendant cities put their cases in the hands of 
Livermore & Fish, patent solicitors. The case against the City of 
Haverhill was made a test case, and at a hearing, November 14, 1888, 
the Court decided for the defendant, and an appeal from that decis- 
ion was taken to the United States Supreme Court, which has recently 
rendered a decision for the defendant. 

5. Kelly vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 



580 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been received 
on Somerville avenue, November 25, 1890. Dismissed December 
17, 1894. 

6. Williams vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Action for damages on account of alleged injuries to cattle 
by the employees of the Gypsy Moth Commission. 

7. Cole, Collector, vs. Charles H. North — Before Superior Court 
for Suffolk County. Action to recover personal estate taxes for 1890» 

8. Mayor and Aldermen of Somerville vs. Fitchburg and Boston 
6^ Albany R. R. — Before Superior Court for Middlesex County. Pe- 
tition for appointment of commissioners in regard to grade crossings 
on Somerville avenue. 

9. O'Brien vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been received 
on Somerville avenue, February 2, 1893. $50 paid in settlement, 
February 20, 1894. 

10. Reardon vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been received 
on Somerville avenue, March 11, 1893. Judgment for $225, and 
judgment paid. 

11. Somerville vs. Gore, et al. — Before Superior Court for Middle- 
sex County. Action to recover $200 paid in suit, McCarthy vs. Som- 
erville, on account of injuries, on October 31, 1892, on Somerville 
avenue. 

12. Bevins vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been received 
on Perkins street, on March 3, 1893. $173 paid in settlement. May 
24, 1894. 

13. Emerson vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middle- 
sex County. Petition for assessment of damages on account of alleged 
taking of land and buildings at Nathan Tufts Park. Petition dismissed 
at trial, February 13, 1894. 

14. Smith vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Action for injury to horse and carriage, alleged to have been 
received on Medford street, on August 28, 1893. 

15. White vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been received 
on September 22, 1892, on Somerville avenue. 



REPORT OF THE CUT SOLICITOR. 581 

16. Tower VS. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Appeal from award for alleged taking of land for sewer on 
Tower street. 

17. Willardvs. So7nerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Action for injuries alleged to have been caused March 1, 
1893, to house on corner of Grand View and Vinal avenues by burst- 
ing of water pipe. SI 29.90 paid in settlement, December 20, 1894. 

18. Graham vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Action for persona] injuries alleged to have been received 
on Franklin street, on December 5, 1892. 

19. Symtnes vs. So7nerville — Before County Commissioners of 
Middlesex County. Petition for repairs of Mystic avenue. 

20. Emerson vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Petition for assessment of damages on account of alleged 
taking of land and buildings at Nathan Tufts Park. 

21. Diinick vs. Somerville — Before County Commissioners of 
Middlesex County. Petition for laying out of Line street. 

22. Veasey vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Suffolk 
County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been received 
on Summit avenue, on January 31, 1894. 

23. Metropolita7i Park Cotnmissioners vs. Somerville — Before 
Supreme Judicial Court for Suffolk County. Petition for appoint- 
ment of commissioners to assess expense of Metropolitan Park 
System. 

24. McNa?nara vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middle- 
sex County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been re- 
ceived by caving in of trench for water pipe, on ]^larch 31, 1894, on 
Elm street. 

25. Rowe vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been received 
on Somerville avenue, on February 28, 1894. 

26. Ahearn vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been received 
on Curtis street, on ^vlarch 2, 1894. 8650 paid in settlement, January 
5, 1895. 

27. Stevens vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Appeal from award of damages for land alleged to have 
been taken for sewer. 



582 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

28. Somerville VS. Walker — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Bill in equity to restrain erection of oil works. 

29. Edgecofnb vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Suffolk 
County. Action for personal injuries alleged to have been received on 
Washington street, on November 5, 1894. 

30. Metropolitan Sewer Commissioners vs. Somerville — Before 
Supreme Judicial Court for Suffolk County. Petition for appointment 
of commissioners to assess expense of metropolitan sewer system. 

31. Reed vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Action for damages alleged to have been received from the 
conducting of sewerage through his premises near Mystic avenue. 

32. Stearns vs. Somerville — Before Superior Court for Middlesex 
County. Appeal from award of damages for land alleged to have 
been taken for sewer. 

In many of the cases, which came before the Committee on Claims, 
the petitioners were given leave to withdraw, and I need not trouble 
you with a recital of them, as we have not heard from them since. 
All of which is respectfully submitted, 

S. Z. BOWMAN, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY CLERK. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, January i6, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports* 
Sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, January 16, 1895. 

Referred to Committee on Printing, to be printed in the Annual Reports, 
in concurrence. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



Office of the City Clerk, ) 
January 16, 1895. J 

To the Honorable, the Mayor and the City Council : — 

Gentlemen, — The following is respectfull}' submitted as the 
twenty-third annual report of the City Clerk of the city of Somerville, 
and is for the year ending December 31, 1894. 

CASH. 

The receipts and payments were as follows : — 

Receipts. 

Balance from year 1893, being for 
dog licenses issued in December, 
1893,-1 male at $2.00 . . $2.00 

1 female at $5.00 . 5.00 



$7.00 



Less city clerk's fees paid to the 
city treasurer in December, 
1893, 2 at $0.20 ... .40 



For dog licenses issued in 1894 : — 

1,227 males at $2.00 . . $2,454.00 

3 spayed at 2.00 . . 6.00 

120 females at 5.00 . . 600.00 



$6.60 



3,060.00 



Amount carried forward ..... $3,066.60 



586 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Aifiouni brought forward ..... $3,066.60 

For recording mortgages, assign- 
ments, etc., 759 papers . $462.75 
certificates of marriage inten- 
tions, 552 at $0.50 . . 276.00 
furnishing copies of records . 22.75 
recording and posting naturaliza- 
tion notices, 2 at $0.50 . 1.00 
transferring dog license . . . .25 
licenses : — 

to collect junk, 33 at $2.00 . 66.00 

^ for billiard and pool tables and 
bowling alleys, 3 licenses, for 
10 tables and 3 alleys, 13 at 
$2.00 .... 26.00 

to auctioneers, 23 at $2.00 . 46.00 

for intelligence offices, 8 at 

$2.00 .... 16.00 

to sell fireworks, m at $1.00 . 66.00 

for amusements, 2 at $50.00 

and 55 at $1.00 . . 155.00 

to street musicians, 25 licenses 

for 46 persons at $0.50 . 23.00 

for night lunch wagon stands 

(permits), 2 at $2.00 . 4.00 

to slaughter cattle, 2 at $1.00 2.00 



1,166.75 



Total receipts ..... $4,233.35 

Payments. 
To Joseph O. Hayden, county treas- 
urer, June 1 and December 
1, receipts for dog licenses from 
December 1, 1893, to November 
30, 1894, both inclusive, 

1,225 males at $2.00 . . $2,450.00 



Amount carried forward . . $2,450.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



587 



Amount brought forward 
3 spayed at 2.00 
121 females at 5.00 



Less city clerk's fees, 1,349 at 
$0.20 

To John F. Cole, city treasurer, 
monthly, city clerk's fees for issu- 
ing dog licenses, 1,350 at $0.20 

All the "receipts" above specified, 
except for dog licenses 



$2,450.00 

6.00 

605.00 



$3,061.00 
269.80 

$270.00 
1,166.75 



Total payments . . . . . 

Balance, January 1, 1895, — 

receipts for dog licenses issued 

in December, — 
3 males at $2.00 . . . $6.00 

Less city clerk's fees paid to city 

treasurer, 3 at $0.20 . . .60 



BIRTHS. 

Number of births in Somerville in 1894 registered 
More than previous year . 

Males 

Females ..... 

Born of American parents 
'' foreign parents 
'' American father and foreign mother 
" foreign father and American mother 
" parents of unknown nationality 
" American mother, and father of unknown 
nationality ..... 

" foreign mother, and father of unknown 
nationality . . 

Number of cases of twins ..... 



$2,791.20 



1,436.75 



$4,227.95 



$5.40 



. 


1,385 


. 


87 


704 




681 






1,385 


507 


587 




141 




143 




1 




4 




2 






1,385 
9 





588 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



MARRIAGES. 

Number of intention certificates issued 
More than previous year 
Marriages registered . 
More than previous year 
Both parties American 
'' foreign . 

American groom and foreign bride 
Foreign groom and American bride 

First marriage of 
Second marriage of . 
Third marriage of 

Oldest groom aged . 
Oldest bride aged 
Youngest groom aged 
Youngest bride aged 
Youngest couple aged, — 

Groom 

Bride 

DEATHS. 

Number of deaths in Somerville in 1894 
More than previous year . 

Males 

Females ..... 

Under 10 years of age 

Between 10 and 20 years of age 



" 20 ' 


' 30 ^' 


" 30 ' 


' 40 '' 


" 40 ' 


' 50 " 


« 50 ^ 


' 60 '' 


" 60 ' 


. 70 u 


u 70 ^ 


' 80 '' 


" 80 ' 


^ 90 " 


*' 90 ' 


^ 100 " 





552 


, , 


20 


. 


574 


. 


2 


274 




162 




73 




65 




^1 A 


couples 


O i '± 


1,045 




96 




7 




574 


couples 


. 


65 


. 


QQ 


. 


18 


• 


17 




18 




19 




873 


. 


71 


424 




449 






873 


354 


26 




65 




62 




55 




87 




83 




93 




43 




5 


«7.q 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



589 



Born 


in Somerville ..... 


296 


Born in other places m the United States . 


351 


Of foreign birth ..... 


222 


Birthplace unknown ..... 


4 


Number of deaths in January 


82 




' "■ February . 


QS 




' " March 


78 




' " April . . . . 


58 




' " May 


76 




* '' June . . . . 


55 




July . . . 


89 




' " August . . . . 


77 




' " September 


68 




' " October . . . . 


70 




' " November 


72 




' '' December 


80 



98 



873 



873 

The number of stillbirths recorded during the year was 45. 
The causes of death may be found in the report of the Board of 
Health. 



(37) 



590 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



VOTERS. 



MEN'S LISTS. 



Ward. 


Precinct. 


G5 

00 

1— 1 

o 
<u 

Q 


Revised Lists 

of September 10, 

1894. 


Added in Sept. 
and Oct., 1894. 


00 

rH 

CM 

O 

O 


Added in Nov., 
1894. 


-<* 

o; 

00 

I— 1 

o" 

<M 

> 

C 


> 

U 

o 

> 


Voted Dec. 4, 
1894. 


Ward 1 . 


Precinct 1 


373 


326 


34 


360 


1 


361 


280 


197 


" 1 . 


« 2 


352 


297 


30 


327 


—1 


326 


260 


199 


" 1 . 


" 3 


478 


407 


48 


455 




455 


334 


215 


" 1 . 


4 


386 

1,589 


329 


25 


354 




354 


254 


133 




1,359 


137 


1,496 




1,496 


1,128 


744 


Ward 2 . 


Precinct 1 


565 


521 


51 


572 


2 


574 


432 


338 


" 2 


2 


602 


536 


53 


589 


2 


591 


464 


349 


" 2 . 


« 3 


338 


307 


25 


332 


1 


333 


261 


151 


" 2 


4 


563 


464 


49 


513 


2 


515 


383 


209 


" 2 


" 5 


402 


331 


30 


361 


1 


362 


273 


151 




2,470 


2,159 


208 


2,367 


8 


2,375 


1,813 


1,198 


Ward 8 . 


Precinct 1 


637 


570 


93 


663 


2 


665 


477 


382 


" 3 . 


2 


445 


402 


52 


454 


2 


456 


329 


261 


" 3 . 


3 


545 


514 


63 


577 


5 


582 


465 


379 


*' 3 . 


4 


464 


458 


92 


550 


4 


554 


408 


303 




2,091 


1,944 


300 


2,244 


13 


2,257 


1,679 


1,325 
245 


Ward 4 . 


Precinct 1 


438 


408 


35 


443 




443 


342 


" 4: . 


2 


392 


355 


■ 70 


425 




425 


322 


187 


" 4 . 


3 


397 


367 


28 


395 


1 


396 


326 


210 


" 4 . 


4 


566 


526 


86 


612 


3 


615 


458 


304 




1,793 


1,656 


219 


1,875 


4 


1,879 


1,448 


946 


City . . 


7,943 


7,118 


864 


7,982 


25 


8,007 


6,068 


4,213 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



591 



WOMEN'S LISTS. 



Ward. 


Precinct. 


Dec. 1, 1893. 


i2 S 

« o 


> 

o 

^ . 

c ^ 
•- 00 

'^ 

< 


1 

> 

o 


d 

o 

> 


Ward 1 . . . 


Precinct 1 . . . 


2 


1 




1 


1 


" 1 . . . 


2 . . 


1 


1 




1 


1 


" 1 . . . 


3 . . . 


8 


2 


1 


3 


3 


" 1 . . . 


4 . . . 














6 


4 


1 


5 


5 


Ward 2 . . . 


Precinct 1 . . . 


3 


1 


4 


5 


4 


" 2 . . . 


2 . . . 


7 


1 


4 


5 


8 


" 2 . . . 


3 . . . 












" 2 . . . 


4 . . . 


1 










" 2 . . . 


5 . . . 


1 












12 


2 


8 


10 


7 


Ward 3 . . . 


Precinct 1 . . . 


3 


2 


8 


10 


10 


" 3 . . . 


2 . . . 


8 


3 


4 


7 


5 


" 3 . , . 


3 . . 


10 


8 


2 


10 


6 


" 3 . . . 


"4 


4 


4 


4 


8 


7 




25 


17 


18 


35 


28 


Ward 4 . . . 


Precinct 1 . . . 


9 


8 


3 


11 


11 


" 4 . . . 


" 2 . . . 


3 


2 




2 




" 4 . . . 


3 . . . 


1 


2 


5 


7 


o 


" 4 . . . 


4 . . . 


5 


•J 


6 


9 


7 




18 
61 


15 


14 
41 


29 


2?j 


City .... 


38 


79 


63 









Herewith are presented copies of ordinances passed since the 
printing of the last annual reports. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, 

Ci'fy Cle^k. 



ORDINANCES 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



March 23, 1895. 

The following ordinances have been adopted since the printing of the Annual 
Reports for the year 1893. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, City Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



No. 51. 

Ax Ordinance in Relation to the Institution of Instruction for 

Truants. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Somerville^ as fol- 
lows : — 

Section 1. Section eight of chapter thirteen of the Revised Ordi- 
nances of 1891 is hereby amended by striking out the words "The 
Lowell Institution for the Reformation of Juvenile Offenders, at 
Lowell," and inserting in place thereof, the words, "The Truant 
School at North Chelmsford," so that, as amended, said section will 
read as follows : Section 8. The Truant School at North Chelmsford, 
County of Middlesex, State of Massachusetts, is hereby assigned and 
provided as the institution of instruction mentioned in the seventh 
section of this ordinance. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved October 16, 1894. 




No. 52. 

An Ordinance in Relation to the Institution of Instruction for 

Truants. 

Be it ordained by the City Coujicil of the City of Somerville, as fol- 
lows : 

Section 1. An ordinance entitled " An Ordinance in Relation to 
the Institution of Instruction for Truants," passed to be ordained by 



596 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

the Common Council, October 11, 1894, and by the Board of Alder- 
men, October 16, 1894, and approved by the Mayor, October 16, 
1894, is hereby repealed. 

Section 2. Section eight of chapter thirteen of the Revised Ordi- 
nances of 1891 is hereby amended by striking out the words, ''The 
Lowell Institution for the Reformation of Juvenile Offenders at 
Lowell, County of Middlesex, State of Massachusetts," and inserting 
in place thereof, the words, " The Middlesex County Truant School at 
Chelmsford," so that, as amended, said section will read as follows : 
Section 8. The Middlesex County Truant School at Chelmsford is 
hereby assigned and provided as the institution of instruction men- 
tioned in the seventh section of this ordinance. 

Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved December 12, 1894. 



No. 53. 

An Ordinance to Amend Chapter Eleven of the Revised Ordi- 
nances OF 1891, in Relation to the Duties of the 
Board of Health. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Somerville, as 
follows : — 

Section 1. Section three of chapter eleven, entitled "Board of 
Health," of the Revised Ordinances of 1891, is hereby amended by 
striking out the words " Shall make all contracts for the cleansing of 
private cesspools, vaults, and privies, and for the collection, carrying 
away, sale, and disposal of the house offal of the city," and substituting 
in place thereof, the words, '^ Shall make provision by contracts, or m 
such other manner as it shall deem expedient, for the cleansing of 
private cesspools, vaults, and privies, and for the collection, carrying 
away, sale, and disposal of the house offal, and the ashes and house- 
dirt of the city." 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved December 26, 1894. 



ORDIXANXES. 597 

No. 54. 

An Ordinance to Amend Section One of Chapter Four of the 
Revised Ordinances as Amended by Ordinance Approved 
May 17th, 1894, in regard to the Annual Appro- 
priation Bill. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Somerville, as fol- 
lows : — 

Section 1. Section one of chapter four, entitled '' Finance," of the 
Revised Ordinances of 1891, as amended by ordinance approved May 
7th, 1894, entitled '' An ordinance to amend section one of chapter 
four of the Revised Ordinances, in regard to the Annual Appropria- 
tion Bill," is hereby amended by inserting after the word " January," 
in the first clause of said section one, the words, "or February," and 
by striking out in the second clause of said section one, the words, '' In 
or before the first two weeks in the month of February," and inserting 
in place thereof, the words, " on or before the fifteenth day of March," 
and by striking out in the third clause of said section one, the words, 
" In or before the last two weeks in the month of February," and insert- 
ing in place thereof, the words, ''on or before the first day of April." 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved March 15, 1895. 



No. 55. 

An Ordinance in Relation to the Discharge cf Flobert Rifles, 

so called, or Air Guns. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Somerville, as fol- 
lows : — 

Section 1. Section twenty-eight of chapter fifteen, entitled '' High- 
ways," of the Revised Ordinances of 1891, is hereby amended in the 
first clause thereof, by inserting after the words, '^ Or with powder 



598 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

only," the words '^ Or any Flobert rifle, so called, or any air gun," so 
that, as amended, said clause will read as follows : 

" No person shall, except in the performance of some duty requiied 
of him by law, discharge any cannon, gun or pistol, or other firearm, 
loaded with ball or shot, or with powder only, or any Flobert rifle, so 
called, or any air gun ; nor shall any person fire any squib, cracker, 
serpent or other preparation whereof gun powder is an ingredient, or 
which consists wholly of the same, or make any bonfire on or upon 
any street or wharf within the city, except by the authority of the board 
of aldermen." 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved March 20, 1895. 



JURY LIST. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, March 27, 1895. 
Ordered : — 

That, in accordance with the provisions of Section 3, of Chapter 514 of the 
Acts of the Legislature of 1894, the City Cleric be, and he is hereby directed to 
cause to be published in the Annual Reports of 1894, the jury list of the city, as it 
now stands, with the address and occupation of each person whose name is on said 
list; the expense incurred to be covered under the contract for printing said Annual- 
Reports. 



In Board of Aldermen, March 27, 1895. 
Read twice and adopted, and sent down for concurrence. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, Clerk. 



In Common Council, March 28, 1895. 
Read twice, and adopted in concurrence. . 

WM. P. MITCHELL, Clerk, pro tern. 



Approved March 29, 1895. 

WM. H. HODGKINS, Mayor,. 



JURY LIST, CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



WARD I, PRECINCT i, 



Bishop, Charles H., 5 Pearl street, engineer. 

Blunt, Matthew M., 24 Lincoln avenue, draughtsman. 

Burrows, Frank B., 29 Mystic avenue, bookkeeper. 

Clark, Wilmer B., 8 Benedict street, jeweler. 

Clarry, Hiram A., 25 Lincoln avenue, carpenter and builder. 

Daniels, Gardner F., 18 Hathorn street, drug broker. 

Davis, E. Lester, 8 Mt. Vernon street, burlaps, etc. 

Davis, Nathaniel J. K., 13 Mt. Vernon street, bookkeeper. 

Delano, John G., 72 Florence street, carpenter. 

Dodge, Edwin G., 21 Benedict street, photographer. 

Fuller, Edwin V., 26 Tenney court, expressman. 

Gilman, Charles S., 11 Hathorn street, teamster. 

Goodspeed, Oliver F., 12 Broadway place, restaurant. 

Goodwin, Maxwell J., 41 Pearl street, painter. 

Grimes, Alexander, 25 Austin street, teamster. 

Handy, Henry A., 8 Hathorn street, compositor. 

Hosmer, Frederick H., 51 Mt. Vernon street, poultry dealer. 

Howe, Herbert P., 91 Perkins street, clerk. 

Hutchins, William A., 16 Mt. Vernon street, shoe seam stay manufacturer, 

Hutchinson, George H., 9 Broadway place, clerk. 

Jenks, Charles A., 14 Benedict street, no occupation. 

King, Edward, 7 Union street, shipper. 

Kramer, Everett A., no Perkins street, clerk. 

Laighton, Mark, 8 Benedict street, carpenter. 

Libbey, Hebron A., no Perkins street, real estate agent. 

Littlefield, George W., 6 Mt. Vernon street, stair builder. 

Lovering, Jonathan P., 86 Myrtle street, mason and builder. 

Nickerson, Charles E., 30 Franklin street, salesman. 

Otis, Gushing, 51 Broadway, real estate agent. 

Peck, Henry A., rear 41 Pearl street, printer. 

Rowell, George H., 10 Franklin street, musician. 



602 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Seavey, Nathaniel H., 22 Mt. Vernon street, carpenter. 

Snow, John C. H., 60 Mt. Vernon street, carpenter. 

Starbird, Edward P., 15 Broadway place, salesman. 

Stilphen, Eugene, 31 Lincoln avenue, expressman. 

Stockbridge, Charles N., 11 Hathorn street, ass't auditor W. E. St. Ry. Co, 

Swords, Thomas A., 129 Perkins street, insurance agents. 

Tooth aker, Rolan H., 10 Mystic avenue, milk dealer. 

Treadwell, Albert L., 117 Perkins street, clerk. 

White, Charles M., 48 Mystic avenue, bookkeeper. 

Wiley, Benjamin S., 15 Benedict street, teamster. 

Wisner, George, 6 Mt. Vernon street, gate tender B. & M. R. R. 

WARD I, PRECINCT 2. 

Ames, Frank E., 80 Cross street, clerk. 

Bartlett, Frank D., 30 Rush street, engineer. 

Bean, James S., 7 Bean court, carpenter. 

Bearse, Edwin W., 43 Cutter street, restaurant. 

Bowers, Frank H., 47 Franklin street, painter. 

Byam, William A., 117 Pearl street, soap maker. 

Chapman, Henry T. G., 42 Cross street, bookkeeper. 

Chase, Frederick D., 6 Ellsworth street, pattern maker. 

Clapp, George H., 20 Webster street, foreman. 

Colgate, Charles H., 92 Glen street, extract manufacturer. 

Cowles, Albert S., 94 Broadway, grocer. 

Crosby, W^arrenA., 32 Rush street, fish market. 

Davis, Charles S., 94 Pearl street, electrician. 

Davis, Fred E., 85 Pearl street, bookkeeper. 

Eccles, William F., 100 Broadway, upholsterer. 

Emerson, William J., 104 Broadway, boots and shoes. 

Fitz, George H., 45 Franklin street, clerk. 

Francis, Weston O., 16 Webster street, carpenter. 

Giles, Charles E., 24 Webster street, milkman. 

Goodspeed, William H., 37 Rush street, dining room. 

Hammett, Charles R., 110 Broadway, printer. 

Hartwell, Walter C, 6 Cross street, bookkeeper. 

Horton, Walter E., 49 Franklin street, trunk m.anufacturer. 

Houghton, Edgar W., 3 Hillside avenue, wholesale provision dealer. 

Jones, Harry W., 5 Ellsworth street, clerk. 

Joslin, Charles E., 33 Webster street, commission merchant. 

Knowles, Cyrus B., 38 Glen street, grocer. 

Leonard, Eugene C, 107 Pearl street, ladies' tailor. 

Littlefield, William E., 95 Pearl street, insurance agent. 

Lombard, Henry F., 114 Pearl street, clothing dealer. 



JURY LIST. 603 

Loveless, Wallace E., 47 Glen street, teamster. 

Lund, John Q., 13 Cutter street, printer. 

Nichols, John D., 88 Glen street, salesman. 

Perkins, Francis C., 8[ Pearl street, salesman. 

Pratt, Josiah N., 33 Franklin street, manager. 

Prescott, Anson E., 73 Pearl street, plumber. 

Prichard, George W., i Bean court, teamster. 

Remick, George W., 16 Cutter street, stucco worker. 

Robinson, William F., 84 Pearl street, artist. 

Scott, Daniel B., 92 Cross stieet, boot maker. 

Stodder, William H., 51 Webster street, milkman. 

Tarbox, Horace E., 30 Austin street, brick mason. 

Thompson, James E., 36 Webster street, electric lignt trimmer. 

Tompkins, Charles H., 2 Austin street, locksmith. 

Turner, William O., 85 Pearl street, bookkeeper. 

Whitton, David E., 78 Pearl street, manufacturer mariners' compasses. 

Willard, George F., 15 Franklin street, real estate agent. 

WARD I, PRECINCT 3. 

Adler, Jacob, 33 Knowlton street, machinist. 

Appleton, Frank, 96 Cross street, jeweler. 

Ashworth, John, 104 Cross street, mechanical draughts! an. 

Benson, Samuel B., 30A Tufts street, grocer. 

Colbath, J. Howard, 193 Medford street, janitor. 

Dowd, Richard, 30 Pinckney street, stove dealer. 

Fisher, Frederick L., i Washington street, travelling salesman. 

Fcsdick, Andrew J., 29 1-2 Alston street, agent. 

Fosdick, Frederick S., 29 1-2 Alston street, collector. 

Galletly, Henry, 7 Franklin avenue, cordage manufacturer. 

Gill, Joseph W., 6 Dell street, fish dealer. 

Goldthwaite, Jerome L, 82 Mt. Vernon street, clerk. 

Harris, Richard J., 18 Pinckney street, fruit dealer. 

Henderson, Benjamin H., 60 Franklin street, foreman. 

Henderson, William C, 85 Mt. Vernon street, agent. 

Kelley, John D., 11 Franklin avenue, painter. 

Longfellow, William F., 44 Pearl street, teamster. 

Lovell, Edgar R., 11 Pinckney street, grocer. 

Mann, Alfred E., 3 Washington avenue, undertaker. 

Manser, James E., 69 Myrtle street, watchman. 

Mason, Seth, 13 Alston street, collector. 

Mills, Arthur B., rear 10 Tufts street, clerk. 

Munroe, James, gi Washington street, carpenter. 

Nealley, Edwin F., rear 109 Glen street, salesman. 



604 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Palmer, Harold P., 40 Flint street, bookkeeper. 
Peterson, Edward T., 33 Franklin avenue, janitor. 
Pryce, Richard E., 93 Mt. Vernon street, tinsmith. 
Rich, John W., rear 81 Mt. Vernon street, agent. 
Snow, Albert E., i Pinckney place, fish dealer. 
Snow, James R., rear 3 Cottage place, fish, oysters, etc. 
Stone, L. Frank, 35 Pinckney street, baker. 
Upton, Henry J., 45 Florence street, rubber worker. 
Wood, Charles M., 118 Cross street, no occupation. 

WARD I, PRECINCT 4. 

Anderson, Peter, 34 Joy street, machinist. 

Casey, Thomas F., 24 Linwood street, hacks and livery stable. 

Corcoran, Timothy J., 105 Linwood street, letter carrier. 

Coughlin, William J., 141 Medford street, upholsterer. 

Crimmings, Timothy F., 3 Maple street, teamster and contractor. 

Cunningham, Owen, 78 Washington street, contractor. 

Elkins, John F., 30 Maple street, teamster and contractor. 

Farrell, Patrick S., 31 Linwood street, polisher. 

Haley, Thomas A., 93 Linwood street, peddler. 

Harney, James H., 56 Joy street, clothing cutter. 1 

Kelley, Michael A., 23 Joy street, clerk. ■ 

Linnehan, Cornelius, 55 Linwood street, marketman. ■ 

Lyons, Timothy J., 14 Chestnut street, horse trader. ' 

Manning, John, 137 Medford street, safe mover. i 

O'Neil, Thomas, 157 Somerville avenue, at N. P. & P. Co. I 

Travers, Robert J., 11 Joy place, laborer. ; 

White, Maurice J., 52 Linwood street, clerk. j 

Wilson, John, 108 Washington street, upholsterer. ] 



WARD 2, PRECINCT i. 

Ball, Frederick, 6 Sanborn avenue, lumber surveyor. 

Bancroft, Edward, 16 Wesley park, barrels. 

Baxter, George E., 75 Boston street, lumber dealer. 

Briggs, J. Albion, 59 Vinal avenue, real estate and insurance agent. 

Burbank, Charles G., 8 Hamlet street, varnish manufacturer. 

Butman, Wallace W., 69 Walnut street, tailor. 

Clark, J. Abbott, 45 Greenville street, advertising agent " Somerville Journal." 

Cutter, George W., Hotel Warren, clerk. 

Dodge, Charles A., 29 Columbus avenue, clerk. 

Drouet, Ernest Charles, 73 Columbus avenue, superintendent Met. Ins. Co. 

Eberle, Philip, 47 Columbus avenue, boots and shoes. 



JURY LIST. 605 

Felch, Gilbert E., 21 Wesley park, provision dealer. 
Fitts, Charles N., 17 Pleasant avenue, with Somerville Citizen. 
Flint, Warren F., 18 Wesley park, stove dealer. 
Gerts, Lemuel B., 12 Grand View avenue, superintendent. 
Hartshorn, William H., 87 Munroe street, extract manufacturer. 
Hartwell, Haywood, 'j'j Munroe street, carpenter. 
Haven, George D., 181 Washington street, real estate. 
Johnson, Benjamin F., 12 Giles park, painter. 
Jones, Melville D., 53 Walnut street, iron goods. 
Kenny, Miah G., 51 Munroe street, clerk. 
Kimball, George A., 7 Munroe street, civil engineer. 
Lyons, Jeremiah J., 22 Aldersey street, agent. 
Merrill, Ernest W., 13 Pleasant avenue, clerk. 
, Miller, Thomas, 'jy Walnut street, nickel plating. 
Munroe, George A., 88 Munroe street, lumber dealer. 
O'Leary, Arthur A., 45 Vinal avenue, designer. 
Pitman, Henry W., 'j'j Columbus avenue, journalist. 
Priest, William R., 7 Grand View avenue, horseshoer. 
Raymond, Herbert W., 13 Wesley park, paint and oil dealer. 
Searles, Charles C, 33 Warren avenue, nurse. 
Shepard, Charles I., 62 Vinal avenue, publisher. 
Slager, Charles A., Hotel Warren, Union square, carpenter. 
Sterritt, Fred D., 68 Columbus avenue, vice-president G.W. Gale Lumber Co. 
Trull, Charles Walter, 63 Columbus avenue, machinist. 
Vinal, Arthur P., 36 Walnut street, lumber dealer. 
Wallburg, Frank, 15 Wesley park, fresco painter. • 

Westgate, Frank B., 14 Thorpe place, painter. 
Whitaker, George E., 19A. Greenville street, secretary. 
Williston, BelvinT., 59 Columbus avenue, draughtsman. 

WARD 2, PRECINCT 2. 

Adams, Frank H., 46 Summer street, confectioner and caterer. 
Armstrong, William M., 91 Summer street, cooper. 
Bennett, Dana W., 48 Putnam street, insurance agent. 
Blaisdell, William J., 31 Ouincy street, painter. 
Bowlby, James L., 70 Berkeley street, teamster. 
Brown, Albion H., 14 Putnam street, commission merchant. 
Brown, J. Horace, 65 Berkeley street, tinsmith. 
Burroughs, William Henry, 11 Landers street, carpenter. 
Chandler, Frank H., 493 Somerville avenue, clerk. 
Coker, Edward C, 43 Berkeley street, grocer. 
Cutter, David, 40 Bow street, watch repairer. 
Doten, Benjamin F., 67 Central street, compositor. 
(38) 



606 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Dyer, Solomon H., 19 Berkeley street, salesman. 

Elliot, Charles D., 59 Oxford street, civil engineer. 

Field, Egbert L., 39 Berkeley street, travelling salesman. 

Foster, Alexander, 45 Laurel street, lumber dealer. 

Gregg, David A., 15 Greene street, draughtsman. 

Grover, Horace N,, 26 Oxford street, fruit dealer. 

Hallock, William G., 22 Greene street, brush manufacturer. 

Harwood, Reuben, 33 Avon street, machinist. 

Hines, Alfred H., 9 Preston street, mason. 

Jackman, Edward N., in Summer street, produce dealer. 

Kelley, John, 102 Highland avenue, contractor. 

Kingman, Herbert S., 34 Prescott street, butter dealer. 

Kneeland, Sylvanus R., Jr., 7 Loring street, yardmaster F. R. R. 

Lane, George H., 22 Berkeley street, type finisher. 

Lord, William H., 6 Summer street, mason. 

Maynard, Lambert M., 90 Highland avenue, milk dealer. 

McLaughlin, Amos B., 104 Highland avenue, trader. 

Pike, Joseph S., 51 Preston street, shipping agent. 

Pratt, George A., 22 Greene street, clerk. 

Robinson, George D., 46 Quincy street, carpenter and builder. 

Sibley, Lincoln H., 39 Laurel street, expressman. 

Smith, Eben E., 40 Summer street, clerk. 

Spaulding, Henry A., 24 Quincy street, machinist. 

Stamford, John W., 89 Oxford street, glassware. 

Swan, Charles F., 17 Greene street, musician and hatter. 

Teasdale, Charles, 86 School street, monuments. 

Walker, Granville A., 9 Loring street, painter. 

Wilder, Warren P., 108 Summer street, cigars. 

WARD 2, PRECINCT 3. 

Armstrong, William, 17 Dane street, watchman. 

Atherton, Adams H., 14 Hawkins street, cooper. 

Bedell, Adington D., rear 10 Carlton street, lather. 

Bennett, Daniel J., 353 Washington street, harness maker. 

Boynton, Amos B., 313 Washington street, salesman. 

Bucknam, Davis P., 12 Vine street, mason. 

Cunningham, George, Jr., 363 Washington street, painter. 

Dewire, Michael B., 411 Washington street, grocer. 

Dwyer, Timothy C, 318 Somerville avenue, bookkeeper. 

Flynn, Dennis F., 67 Dane street, upholsterer. 

Flynn, William H., 67 Dane street, real estate and insurance agent. 

Greenleaf, Franklin A., 23 Lake street, paper hanger. 

Guild, Frederick B., 36 Lake street, provision dealer. 



JURY LIST. 607 

Haskell, Albert L., 422 Somerville avenue, printer. 
Legallee, Charles A., 4 Olive square, plumber. 
McCue, James A., 47 Hanson street, carpet upholsterer. 
Moore, George, 45 Dane street, carpenter. 
O'Leary, David T., 14 Lake street, confectioner. 
O'Neil, Bernard, 373 Washington street, peddler. 
Pratt, Edgar J., 8 Park street, tin-plate worker. 
Reed, Edward F., 35 Union square, paper hanger. 
Streeter, George H., 19 New Church street, clerk. 
Wilkins, Albert S., 22 New Church street, carpenter. 

WARD 2, PRECINCT 4. 

Brine, William H. 40 Houghton street, furniture. - 

Brophy, Thomas C, 17 Fremont avenue, travelling salesman. 

Garden, Peter I., 14 Kingman court, clerk. 

Clark, S. Adams, 11 Clark street, foreman. 

Cummings, Charles A., 76 Newton street, welt manufacturer. 

Cummings, Harrie R., ']6 Newton rjtreet, welt maker. 

Cunningham, Thomas A., 3 Oak street, milk inspector. 

Davlin, James F., 15 Kingman court, plumbing, steam and gas-fitter* 

Ennis, William H., 16 Bowdoin street, manager. 

Fitzpatrick, Philip J., 15 Houghton street, upholsterer and janitor. 

Gilberth, Charles A., 58 Concord avenue, travelling salesman. 

Harrington, Arthur D., 26 Oak street, clerk. 

Haynes, Arthur W., 11 Parker street, salesman. 

Hooper, George W., 8 Bolton street, paper hanger. 

Ireland, Edwin, 37 Webster avenue, car painter. 

Jameson, Robert, 22 Bowdoin street, lunch and billiard hall. 

Keefe, Daniel J., 46 Springfield street, plumber. 

Kenney, John R., 19 Beacon street, teamster. 

Knowles, Benjamin H, 15 Parker street, silk hatter. 

McDonnell, Jeremiah B., 38 Concord avenue, printer. 

McKusick, Charles T., i Dimick street, bookkeeper. 

McKusick, Royal, i Dimick street, watchman. 

McLane, James A., 41 Clark street, bill poster. 

McLean, William J., 32 Concord avenue, carpenter. 

Monahan, John, 30 Line street, milk dealer. 

Munroe, Alexander, 33 Webster avenue, grocer. 

Osborne, Porter E., 76 Newton street, salesman. 

Page, George Amos, 21 Webster avenue, plumber. 

Rafferty, Thomas, 30 Oak street, plumber. 

Ray, George D., 26 Concord avenue, engineer. 

Rogers, Charles W., 14 Oak street, clerk. 



608 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Schuebeler, Charles F., 384 Washington street, jeweler. 
Sewall, Charles E., 19 Webster avenue, clerk. 
Shattuck, Milo P., 14 Bolton street, driver N. P. & P. Co. 
Silsbee, Charles W., 87 Concord avenue, printer. 
Southwick, Charles A., 28 Clark street, janitor. 
Thompson, William H. J., 55 Concord avenue, carpenter. 
Walsh, Terrance, 42 Oak street, watchman. 
Winterbottom, Israel, 2 Bolton street, clerk. 

WARD 2, PRECINCT 5. 

Bassett, Albert H., 12 Webster avenue, provision dealer. 

Belcher, Horace A., 12 Webster avenue, provision dealer. 

Brown, Lyman H., 284 Somerville avenue, livery stable keeper. 

Flynn, Edward J., i Tremont place, student. 

Gibbs, Charles B., 6 Prospect place, foreman. 

Gibbs, Eben, 43 Prospect place, painter. 

Guild, Edgar A., 28 Webster avenue, salesman. 

Hepburn, James, 226 Somerville avenue, grocer. 

Leland, Bainbridge B., 18 Union square, news agent. 

Leydon, Michael J., 8 Ward street, stone pointer. 

Llewellyn, Edward J., 216 Somerville avenue, variety store and painter. 

Mallahan, Thomas, 38 Medford street, laborer. 

McAvoy, William J., 24 Charlestown street, vegetable peddler. 

McCormack, Frederick J., rear 204 Washington street, umbrella maker. 

McGonagle, John J., 14 Linden street, driver N. P. & P. Co. 

McGovern, Philip E., 18 Medford street, hack and boarding stable keeper. 

MoUoy, John T., 8 MoUoy court, cattle dealer. 

Richards, George A., 118 Prospect street, diamond merchant. 

Riley, Charles E., 38 Merriam street, clerk. 

Spellman, Thomas, 13 Ward street, grease collector. 

Staples, Mendall G., 42 Prospect street, teamster. 

Thompson, Samuel Herbert, 41 Prospect street, salesman. 

Walker, Irason B., 10 Union square, carriage manufacturer and repairer. 

WARD 3, PRECINCT i. 

Earrett, James, 14 New Cross street, machinist. 

Boyer, George R., 29 Wigglesworth street, carpenter and builder. 

Erundage, Andrew G., 86 Flint street, lead glazier. 

Eurgess, Edward W., 59 Otis street, produce. 

Eurrows, Frederick U., 147 Cross street, milkman. 

Euttrick, Francis L., 20 Everett avenue, clerk. 

Clark, Cyrus D., 30 Everett avenue, sexton. 



JURY LIST. 609 

Curtis, Edmund W., 176 Broadway, dry goods. 

Daniels, Theodore P., 137 Pearl street, showcase maker. 

Dodge, John T., Jr., 42 Oilman street, engineer. 

Downs, Frank N., 23 Cross street, grocery and provision dealer. 

Elkins, Charles H., 18 Auburn avenue, grocer. 

Fletcher, James H., 73 Oilman street, cabinet maker. 

Gillette, Edward L., 7 Avon place, manufacturer carriage stock. 

Orant, Fred, 9 Everett avenue, expressman. 

Hanson, William H., 175 Broadway, baker. 

Harvey, Edwin 0., 64 Flint street, cab driver. 

Hayden, J. Orville, 79 Cross street, auditing clerk. 

Hodgdon, Charles H., 2S Dana street, real estate agent. 

Hurn, Oeorge F., 12 Autumn street, carpenter and carpet cleaner. 

Ingalls, Wilson H., 8 Everett avenue, cooper. 

Kauler, Alfred E., 133 Cross street, provision dealer. 

King, Charles R., 107 Cross street, clerk. 

King, Martin L., 107 Cross street, grocer. 

Knapp, Henry E., 141 Walnut street, silversmith. 

Litchfield, J. Warren, 181 Broadway, milkman. 

Locke, Harry J., 55 Oilman street, clerk. 

Lowell, Howard, 46 Oilman street, hack stable and hay and grain dealer. 

Lowell, Oliver E., ^j Everett avenue, clerk. 

Martin, Alexander, 15 Aldrich street, bootmaker. 

McOregor, David L., 139 W^alnut street, real estate agent. 

Mills, Hiram R., 170 Pearl street, salesman. 

Moore, Herbert C, 11 Wigglesworth street, travelling salesman. 

Ray, Frank E., 16 Virginia street, salesman. 

Ricker, John K., 14 Virginia street, carpenter and contractor. 

Shedd, Xenophon B., 86 Oilman street, chairmaker. 

Stuart, Lewis R., 21 Delaware street, variety store. 

Underhill, Charles L., 27 Aldrich street, carriage repairing and steel 

specialties. 
Veazie, William, 135 Walnut street, retired. 

WARD 3, PRECINCT 2. 

Angier, Lucius B., 77 Derby, coal and hay dealer. 
Ayers, Edward, 7 Howe street, no occupation. 
Bacon, Fred C, 78 ^Marshall street, clerk. 
Bailey, John T., 14 Bradley street, stationery. 
Bartlett, Edward T., 51 Marshall street, salesman. 
Bement, William B., 87 Temple street, paperhanger. 
Curtis, Oeorge W., 44 Jaques street, fish dealer. 
Davis, Albert M., 16 Chauncey avenue, teamster. 



610 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Dodd, George H., 54 Marshall street, clerk. 

Dusseault, John H., 21 Mills street, ornamental carver. 

Edwards, Edward H., 10 James street, chiropodist. 

Flint, Arthur B., 22 Mills street, clerk. 

Foster, George W., 7 Evergreen avenue, real estate agjent. 

Frye, Charles H., 20 Mills street, machinist. 

Gage, Charles A., 32 Marshall street, clerk. 

Harris, Joseph, 158 Walnut street, bookkeeper. 

Miller, Herbert E., 27 Howe street, confectioner. 

Morrill, Frank A., 5 Bradley street, photographer and dry goods. 

Peirce, Cyrus H., 75 Marshall street, jeweler. 

Perkins, George W., 79 Derby street, steam engine builder. 

Pillsbury, Ernest D., 16 Mills street, railway mail clerk. 

Race, Hiram G., 41 Derby street, carpenter. 

Sawin, JohnT., 19 Stickney avenue, milkman. 

Scribner, John W., 86 Marshall street, shipper. 

Sellon, Henry B., 9 Stickney avenue, janitor, 

Simonds, Edwin N., 47 Jaques street, milk dealer. 

Small, Josiah B., 225 Pearl street, dealer in agricultural implements. 

Snow, Walter H., 42 Derby street, grocery and provision dealer. 

Weeks, Edgar L., 14 Evergreen avenue, clerk. 

White, Henry F., 18 Grant street, silver-plate worker. 

Whitney, Ervin T., 179 School street, produce dealer. 

WARD 3, PRECINCT 3. 

Adams, Charles, 117 Highland avenue, machinist. 

Bacon, Oliver, 19 Pembroke street, clerk. 

Barker, James A., 140 School street, produce dealer. 

Beals, Henry M., 384 Broadway, clerk. 

Bragan, Lawrence A., 39 Montrose street, freight clerk. 

Burrage, Henry G., 20 Dartmouth street, cashier. 

Carroll, Joseph M., 63 Jaques street, shipping clerk. 

Churchill, Algernon H., 10 Thurston street, superintendent. 

Clarridge, George F., 186 School street, chemist. 

Clement, Herman A., 10 Tennyson street, printer. 

Curtis, Joseph, 8 Richdaie avenue, gas-fitter. 

Gushing, Alonzo B., 3 Thurston street, drug clerk. 

Dalton, Charles X., 99 Highland avenue, optical instrument maker. 

Field, Orton D., 98 Jaques street, salesman. 

Fisher, Arthur V., 62 Evergreen avenue, agent. 

Fuller, Ormando H., 148 School street, clerk. 

Gage, Burt O., 38 Dartmouth street, engineer. 

Grimmons, Charles A., 72 Thurston street, salesman. 



JURY LIST. 611 

Hall, William F., 345 Broadway, accountant. 

Hatch, Arthur W., 190 School street, grocer. 

Hathaway, Henry C, X2 Pembroke street, painter. 

Hill, Willard C, 106 Sycamore street, special agent. 

Hilling, James F., i Essex street, clerk. 

Holden, Frank S., 153 Central street, bookkeeper. 

Hooper, Charles J., 49 Heath street, bookkeeper. 

Hyde, George B., 51 Madison street, foreman. 

Innes, Nelson J., 26 Richdale avenue, reporter. 

Irish, Thaddeus P., 3 Dartmouth street, bookkeeper. 

Jones, Harlan P., 83 Jaques street, cabinet maker. 

Kaula, Matthew, 38 Richdale avenue, pressman. 

Kennard, John F., 5 Dartmouth street, salesman. 

Keyes, Charles A., 6 Adams street, produce dealer. 

Kyle, Charles W., loi Jaques street, mason. 

Littlefield, Samuel T., 321 Broadway, no occupation. 

Lovejoy, Benjamin P., 141 Highland avenue, furnaces. 

Lowell, James S., 52 Madison street, superintendent. 

O'Brien, Daniel P., 36 Montrose street, porter. 

Parks, States K., 3 Essex street, clerk. 

Pickthall, Richard E., 182 Central street, clerk. 

Powers, Luray C, 14 Moreland street, saw manufacturer. 

Preble, Frederick A,, 55 Tennyson street, hides. 

Rand, Fred C, 39 Madison street, carpenter. 

Simes, Charles F., 53 Dartmouth street, superintendent. 

Stacy, Albert C, 3 Montrose street, foreman printer. 

Thomas, Penrose F., 396 Medford street, salesman. 

Tower, Andrew, 186 School street, bookkeeper. 

Townsend, True W., 17 Dartmouth street, real estate agent. 

Vreeland, Edward B., 121 Central street, grain and coal dealer. 

Whipple, William H., 87 Thurston street, commercial traveller. 

Willey, Clarence H., 26 Dartmouth street, hay and grain dealer. 

Willoughby, George T., iii Central street, carpenter. 

WARD 3, PRECINCT 4. 

Alley, Charles S,, 149 Hudson street, dealer building material. 
Andersen, Henry, 80 Albion street, ship-chandler. 
Armstrong, Thomas W., 39 Partridge avenue, sawyer. 
Baldwin, Arthur C, 29 Albion street, clerk. 
Barter, Gilmore T., 168 Albion street, butter dealer. 
Belding, Oscar H., 62 Hudson street, carpenter. 
Berry, Arthur W., 53 Hudson street, carpenter. 
Brown, Charles E., 36 Albion street, carpenter. 



612 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Carpenter, Lewis J., 3 Center street, metal spinner. 

Clayton, Fred I., 454 Medford street, merchant tailor. 

Coffin, Edward B., 94 Albion street, real estate and insurance agent 

Dawson, Howard, d'j Albion street, clerk. 

Elvedt, Mark J., 36 Ames street, salesman. 

Fuller, George F., 492 Medford street, expressman. 

Goddard, John J., 100 Central street, bookkeeper. 

Gray, Henry, 65 Murdock street, teamster. 

Griffiths, William F., 95 Vernon street, butter and eggs dealer. 

Hale, C. Warner, 90 Central street, tailor. 

Hands, Frederick W., 38 Albion street, watchmaker. 

Higgins, Frederick W., 75 Hudson street, salesman. 

Huse, George W. S., 19 Albion street, teamster. 

Jones, Edward L., 50 Vernon street, clerk. 

Jones, William P., 50 Vernon street, reporter. 

Keeler, Charles W., 128 Central street, bookkeeper. 

Little, John K., 93 Hudson street, bookkeeper. 

Lorentzen, Henry, 18 Waldo street, lock expert. 

McKenna, George F., 292 Lowell street, undertaker. 

Miller, Charles N., Z"] Jenny Lind avenue, confectioner. 

Pearson, Edwin H., 91 Jenny Lind avenue, engineer. 

Peirce, Abner F., 26 Bartlett street, salesman. 

Perry, William A., 56 Albion street, fireman (O. C. R. R.) 

Porter, Frank E., 69 Partridge avenue, stenographer. 

Pratt, Ransom D., 76 Albion street, adv. agent. 

Prime, George W., 78 Partridge avenue, painter. 

Richardson, Homer L., 88 Albion street, compositor. 

Robie, Albert E., 56 Vernon street, clerk. 

Sallaway, Thomas D., 51 Trull street, salesman. 

Schepmoes, Joseph S., 44 Vernon street, printer. 

Shaw, William H., 92 Central street, clerk. 

Stacey, George W., 14 Albion street, clerk. 

Sturtevant, Albert S., 31 Robinson street, baggage master. 

Thacher, Cyrus, 15 Albion street, produce dealer. 

Valentine, Edward K., 5 Miner street, clerk. 

White, Joseph A., 150 Hudson street, carpenter. 

Wilkins, George F., 98 Central street, freight forwarder. 

Williams, Frank G., 37 Albion street, milk dealer. 

Wilson, John R., 60 Albion street, carpenter. 

WARD 4, PRECINCT i. 

Ayer, Fred C, 160 Highland avenue, wood and lumber dealer. 
Buckley, Patrick, 31 Porter street, furniture manufacturer. 



JURY LIST. 615 

Bullard, Charles H., 3 Park street, clerk. 

Clark, Isaac H., 49 Brastow avenue, mechanical engineer. 

Colby, Luther, 217 Beacon street, janitor. 

David, James B., 78 Belmont street, no occupation 

DeCoster, Verin, 43 Lowell street, salesman. 

Egerton, Wales L., 61 Beach street, no occupation. 

Gale, Charles, 10 Brastow avenue, cabinet maker. 

Gibby, Robert H., Jr., 26 Mondamin court, coppersmith. 

Good, Thomas, 30 Brastow avenue, salesman. 

Gordon, George A., 54 Belmont street, agent. 

Holt, Harry, 107 Porter street, carpenter. 

Joy, Alden B., 20 Belmont street, carpenter. 

Keating, Charles, 229 Summer street, compositor. 

Lynch, James B., 571 Somerville avenue, boot and shoe maker. 

McDermott, Daniel W., 590 Somerville avenue, painter. 

Mongan, Manasses P., i Garden court, salesman. 

O^Neil, Edward T., 20 Kent court, furniture polisher. 

Peake, Benjamin W., 62 Central street, bookkeeper. 

Peckham, George W., 17 Cambria street, real estate agent. 

Pitman, Charles B., York terrace, civil engineer. 

Prindle, James D., Jr., 179 Summer street, teacher of languages. 

Proctor, Amos L., 54 Spring street, grocer. 

Pushee, John C, 22 Harvard place, brush manufacturer. 

Quinlan, John J., 607 Somerville avenue, trunk maker. 

Robinson, Charles T., 21 Park street, brass finisher. 

Spring, John C, 23 Craigie street, clerk. 

Turner, Hiram, 16 Gibbens street, clerk. 

Wall, William E., 14 Morgan street, grainer. 

WARD 4, PRECINCT 2. 

Bucknam, William E., 341 Beacon street, mason. 

Bunten, Frederick R., 38 Cherry street, feather duster manufacturer. 

Chase, George H., 45 Cherry street, clerk. 

Crawford, J. Arthur, 19 Eastman place, carpenter. 

Currier, James H., 9 Mossland street, manager. 

Dawes, Henry L., 8 Ashland street, confectioner. 

Finnon, James R., 36 Porter street, plumber. 

Foster, Jacob, 25 Cherry street, no occupation. 

Friend, Frederick W., 22 Hancock street, plasterer. 

Hay ward, Waldo B., 21 Cherry street, clerk. 

Hayward, Wales A., 21 Cherry street, no occupation. 

Jones, Enoch B., 13 Hall street, painter. 

Kendall, George F., 44 Cedar street, clerk. 



614 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Lacy, Patrick, 63 Cherry street, mason. 

Lakin, George W., 67 Cedar street, insurance agent. 

Locke, John A., 78 Cedar street, carpenter. 

Lomax, George H., 7 Miller street, real estate. 

Lynch, William, 33 Cedar street, no occupation. 

McDonald, William M., 70 Cedar street, wholesale beef dealer. 

McFarland, Chester S., 21 Cedar street, commission merchant. 

Mink, Louis, 85 Elm street, no occupation. 

Nye, Thomas V. B., 51 Cedar street, bookkeeper. 

Sherman, Thomas B., 65 Cedar street, no occupation. 

Skelton, Barnett T., 5 Banks street, builder. 

Story, Isaac M., 250 Summer street, civil engineer. 

WARD 4, PRECINCT 3. 

Arnold, William H., 249 Elm street, no occupation. 

Baker, Osmon D., 33 Day street, travelling salesman. 

Barker, William H., 367 Summer street, jeweler. 

Bowers, Frank E., 57 Orchard street, milkman. 

Bowers, Harrison G. O., 249 Elm street, no occupation. 

Butters, Horace B., 20 St. James avenue, foreman. 

Crowell, Thomas H., 24 Cottage avenue, machinist. 

Cummings, Silas L., 251 Elm street, livery stable keeper. 

Dupont, John B., 9 Whipple street, hardware dealer. 

Dyer, Charles P., 14 Herbert street, salesman. 

Ellis, Franklin E., 16 Day street, travelling salesman. 

Felt, Irwin G., 62 Morrison street, wheelwright. 

Flanders, Albert F., 16 Day street, manager. 

Gilman, John W., 14 Clifton street, salesman. 

Grant, Edwin T., 12 Medina building, Elm street, fruit dealer. 

Haskell, Barnabas D., Jr., 19 Chester street, dry goods dealer. 

Hazeltine, Channing, 88 Orchard street, real estate agent. 

Kennedy, Clifton A., 425 Highland avenue, car conductor. 

Lambert, John B., 21 Kidder avenue, salesman. 

Leigh ton, John H., 14 St. James avenue, assistant superintendent. 

Littlefield, George E., 16 Chester, bookseller. 

McGrath, Philip J., 347 Elm street, manager. 

McKee, Andrew H., 20 Cottage avenue, potter. 

Miner, Robert A., 56 Chester street, no occupation. 

Patch, Charles A., 12 Grove street, provision dealer. 

Puffer, David, Jr., 24 Hall avenue, produce dealer. 

Rhoades, Solomon, 410 Highland avenue, grocer. 

Russell, Edward B., 19 Russell street, bookbinder. 

Trefren, George W., Jr., 15 Morrison street, carpenter. 



JURY LIST. 615 

Vose, Charles H., 78 Morrison street, salesman. 

White, Frederick A., 72 Dover street, shipper. 

Wilkins, Samuel H., 103 Orchard street, beef dealer. 

Wing, Lingan C, 104 Orchard street, machines. 

Young, Joseph D., 7 Medina building, Elm street, gold and silver engraver. 

WARD 4, PRECINCT 4. 

Atwell, Horace F., 7 Newbury street, stove polish. 

Balch, Frederick, 206 Holland street, carpenter. 

Clark, Augustus O., 14 Kingston street, clerk. 

Collieson, Samuel A., 46 Wallace street, leather. 

Comee, Edgar F., 54 Chandler street, travelling salesman. 

Conant, George H., 8 Park avenue, no occupation. 

Cummings, George W., 51 Wallace street, driver. 

Cummings, Guy P., 47 Wallace street, printer. 

Dunning, George C, 86 Irving street, wood and coal dealer. 

Earle, Charles A., 87 Irving street, boot and shoe dealer. 

Eastman, James B., 38 Chandler street, grocery and provision dealer. 

Fay, Henry C, Jr , 10 Wallace street, engraver. 

Gaffney, William H., 13 Elmwood street, fish dealer. 

Heald, W. Irving, 86 Chandler street, hardware dealer. 

Hill, Alfred S., 124 Holland street, student. 

Hunt-r, Clarence, 34 Newbury street, carpenter. 

Ladd, Frank P., 5 Moore street, superlative food. 

Libby, Frederick W., 46 Moore street, picture frame maker. 

Merrill, Frank E., 47 Fairmount avenue, clerk. 

Otis, Charles E., 1252 Broadway, carpenter. 

Pierce, Granville T., 33C Dover street, gypsy moth exterminator. 

Russell, Irving L., 1323 Broadway, farmer. 

Sails, Edwin S., 77 Chandler street, travelling salesman. 

Savage, William B., 25 Fairmount avenue, furniture dealer. 

Smith, Elliott C, 25 Irving street, bookkeeper. 

Snow, Winsor L., 42 Curtis street, hardware and plumber. 

Stevens, John H., 11 Park avenue, carpenter and builder. 

Terry, J. Frank, 380 Elm street, photo, finisher. 

Thurston, Ira M., 37 Campbell park, bricklayer. 

True, Harry A., 140 Holland street, real estate agent and asst. city assessor. 

Young, David, 29 Endicott avenue, slater. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS 



FOR 189^. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 189^. 

MAYOR. 

WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, 
188 Central street. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 
EDMUND S. SPARROW, President. 

Ward One. 

ISAIAH H. WILEY 54 Mt. Vernon street 

WILFRED B. RICH 13 Franklin street 

Ward Two. 

FRED W. GILBERT loi School street 

MELVILLE D. JONES SZ Walnut street 

Ward Three. 

CALVIN H. WHITNEY . . . . . 68 Gilman street 

LEONARD B. CHANDLER .... 45 Jaques street 

Ward Four. 

EDMUND S. SPARROW 18 Meacham street 

BENJAMIN J. DOWNS 5 Claremon street 

CLERK. 
GEORGE L VINCENT. 



€20 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



L. HERBERT HUNTLEY, President. 



Ward One. 



L. HERBERT HUNTLEY 
ALBERT C. FAIRBANKS 
JOSIAH N. PRATT . 
F. DEWITT LAPHAM . 



I Pearl street 

91 Perkins street 

33 Franklin street 

3 Hathorn street 



Ward Two. 

FREDERICK W. PARKER .... 

WILLIAM M. IRVING 

GEORGE E. WHITAKER .... 
ROBERT S. WRIGHT 

Ward Three. 

HERBERT L. CLARK 

JAMES M. ANDREWS . . 

JAMES G. HINCKLEY 

ANDREW A. LAMONT 

Ward Four. 

WILLIAM H. BERRY 

JOHN N. BALL 

HOWARD D. MOORE 

ELMER A. STEVENS 

CLERK. 

CHARLES S. ROBERTSON. 



65 Boston street 

82 Summer street 

19 A Greenville street 

1 1 Summit avenue 



124 Sycamore street 

172 Broadway 

254 School Street 

43 Heath street 



39 Cherry street 

690 Broadway 

73 Curtis street 

84 Morrison street 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1895. 621 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Chandler and Rich; Councilmen Pratt, 
Whitaker and Stevens. 

City Engineering. — Aldermen Gilbert and Sparrow; Councilmen 
Fairbanks, Hinckley and Irving. 

Claims. — His Honor, the Mayor, and Alderman Rich ; the President of 
the Common Council, Councilmen Wright and Moore. 

Finance. — His Honor, the Mayor, Aldermen Whitney and Jones ; the 
President of the Common Council, Councilmen Fairbanks, Parker, Clark 
and Moore. 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Wiley and Sparrow; Councilmen 
Berry, Huntley and Lamont. 

Fuel and Street Lights. — Aldermen Chandler and Downs; Coun- 
cilmen Hinckley, Wright and Lapham. 

Highways. — Aldermen Gilbert and Whitney ; Councilmen Berry, Clark 
and Lapham. 

Legislative Matters. — His Honor, the Mayor, and Alderman Gil- 
bert; the President of the Common Council, Councilmen Wright and Moore. 

Ordinances. — Aldermen Rich and Chandler; Councilmen Hinckley, 
Whitaker and Ball. 

Printing. — Aldermen Rich and Downs ; Councilmen Ball, Irving and 
Lamont. 

Public Grounds. — Aldermen Jones and Wiley; Councilmen Fair- 
banks, Stevens and Andrews. 

Public Property. — Aldermen Sparrow and Chandler; Councilmen 
Pratt, Parker and Andrews. 

Soldiers' Relief. — Aldermen Jones and Chandler; Councilmen 
Berry, Pratt and Andrews. 

Water. — Aldermen Downs and Whitney; the President of the 
Common Council, Councilmen Ball and Irving. 



(39) 



622 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Elections. — Aldermen Wiley, Chandler and Sparrow. 

Enrolled Ordinances and Resolutions. — Aldermen Jones, Downs 
and Wiley. 

Licenses. — Aldermen Whitney, Downs and Jones. 

Police. — Aldermen Wiley and Sparrow. 

Sewers. — Aldermen Sparrow, Gilbert and Whitney. 

State Aid. — Aldermen Downs, Gilbert, Whitney and Rich. 

Special Building Permits. — Aldermen Gilbert and Wiley. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Elections and Returns.' — Councilmen Parker, Lamont and Lapham. 

Enrolled Ordinances and Resolutions. — Councilmen Clark, 
Whitaker and Stevens. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1895. 623 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 

L. HERBERT HUNTLEY, President of the Common Council, ex officio, 

(Term, three years.) 

Ward One. 

S. NEWTON CUTLER (elected 1894). 

SANFORD HANSCOM, M. D. (elected 1893). 

GEORGE S. POOLE ( elected 1892). 

Ward Two. 

THOMAS M. DURELL, M. D. (elected 1893 ). 

ALVAH B. DEARBORN, M. D. (elected 1894). 

HERBERT A. CHAPIN ( elected 1892). 

Ward Three. 

QUINCY E. DICKERMAN (elected 1892). 

THOMAS S. WENTWORTH (elected 1893 ). 

FRANK H. HARDISON (elected 1894). 

Ward Four. 

GILES W. BRYANT, M. D. (elected 1892). 

MARTIN W. CARR (elected 1893). 
GEORGE A. MILES, M. D. (elected 1894 ). 



GORDON A. SOUTH WORTH, Superintendent and Secretary. 



624 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

ASSESSORS. 

( Term, three years. ) 

BENJAMIN F. THOMPSON, Chairman ( term expires 1896) 

SAMUEL T. RICHARDS (term expires 1898). 

NATHAN H. REED (term expires 1897), 

Clerk of Assessors, KL^Y.'KT B. FALES. 



ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 
( Term, one year.) 

Ward Onk. 
FRED. B. CLAPP. 

Ward Two. 

CHARLES C. FARRINGTON. 

Ward Three. 

EDGAR T. MAYHEW. 

Ward Four. 
HARRY A. TRUE. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



( Term : City Physician, three years ; other members, two years. ) 

ALVANO T. NICKERSON, Chairman (term expires 1896). 

ALVAH B. DEARBORN, M. D., City Physician ( term expires 1898). 

ALLEN F. CARPENTER (term expires 1897). 

Clerk, WILLIAM P. MITCHELL. 

Inspector, CALEB A. PAGE. 

Superintendent Collection of Ashes aud Offal, ROBERT DUDDY. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND OFFICERS FOR 1895. 625 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Office, Police Building, Bow Street. 

WILLIAM H. HODGKINS, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 

( Term, four years.) 

EDWARD B. WEST, President (term expires 1899). 

ALBERT W. EDMANDS (term expires 1897). 

HERBERT E. MERRILL (term expires 1898 ). 

EZRA D. SOUTHER (term expires 1896). 

Agent, CHARLES C. FOLSOM. 

Secretary, CORA F. LEWIS. 



SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 

Office, Prospect Street, corner Somerville Avenue. 

( Term, three years. ) 

GEORGE D. WEMYSS, President (term expires 1897) 
5 Austin Street. 

GEORGE A. KIMBALL ( term expires 1898 ). 
7 Munroe Street. 

WILLIAM FRANKLIN HALL (term expires 1896). 
345 Broadway. 

NATHANIEL DENNETT, Supt. Water Works. 
FRANK E. MERRILL, Clerk. 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS. 

( Term : City Clerk, one year ; other members, three years.) 

CROMWELL G. ROWELL, Chairman ( term expires 1897), 

CHARLES P. LINCOLN (term expires 1898). 

CHARLES E. PARKS (term expires 1896). 

GEORGE I. VINCENT, City Clerk. 



626 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

( Term, three years. ) 

CHARLES S. LINCOLN, Chairman ( term expires 1897). 
CHARLES A. WEST ( term expires 1898 ). 

JOHN B. VI ALL (term expires 1896). 

J. HENRY FLITNER (term expires 1898). 

CHRISTOPHER E. RYMES (term expires 1897). 

ELIJAH C. CLARK (term expires 1898). 

CHARLES H. BROWN (term expires 1897). 

J. FRANK WELLINGTON (term expires 1896). 

CHARLES W. SAWYER (term expires 1896). 

JOHN S. YihXY.^, Librarian and Secretary. 



CITY CLERK AND CLERK OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

GEORGE I. VINCENT. 



CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

JOHN F. COLE. 



MESSENGER TO CITY COUNCIL. 

JAIRUS MANN. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 
SELWYN Z. BOWMAN. 



CITY AUDITOR. 
CHARLES S. ROBERTSON. 



CITY ENGINEER. 
HORACE L. EATON. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 
THOMAS H. FAMES. 



CITY GOVERNMENT AND (OFFICERS FOR 1895. 627 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS AND SUPERINTENDENT OF 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



THOMAS R. ROULSTONE. 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 
MELVILLE C. PARKHURST. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
JAMES R. HOPKINS. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF ELECTRIC LINES AND LIGHTS. 
LEIGHTON W. MANNING. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 
ALVAH B. DEARBORN, M; D. 



INSPECTOR OF MILK AND VINEGAR. 
THOMAS CUNNINGHAM. 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND PROVISIONS. 
THOMAS CUNNINGHAM. 



SEALER OF ^VEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 
AMMIEL COLMAN. 



CLERK OF COMMITTEES. 
WILLIAM P. MITCHELL. 



628 ANNUAL REPORTS. 

CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 
ALBERT B. FALES. 



Suitable Persons to Cause to be Properly Interred the Bodies of 

Honorably Discharged Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines, 

Under Chapter 395, Acts of i88g. 

JESSE J. UNDERHILL. 
JAMES F. DAVLIN. 



CONSTABLES. 



JAIRUS MANN. MELVILLE C. PARKHURST. 

ROBERT R. PERRY. WILLIAM D. HAYDEN. 

CHARLES C. FOLSOM. JOSEPH J. GILES. 

EDWARD McGARR. DENNIS KELLEY. 
CHRISTOPHER C. CAVANAGH CHARLES L. ELLIS. 

EUGENE A. CARTER. CLARENCE TUCKER. 

PATRICK J. GARVIN. GEORGE H. CARLETON. 

JOHN B. McKENNA. JOSEPH W. CURRANT. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 
LAMBERT M. MAYNARD. AMMIEL COLMAN. 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK. 
SAMUEL T. LITTLEFIELD. 



MEASURERS OF GRAIN. 

JOHN CRAIG. 
ALBERT C. LYMAN. 



PUBLIC WEIGHER IN CHARGE OF CITY SCALES, UNION 

SQUARE. 

FULTON O'BRION. 



CITY GOVERXMEXT AXD OFFICERS FOR 1895. 



629 



JOHN CRAIG. 
GEORGE K. WALCOTT. 
CHARLES H. TUCKER. 
GEORGE E. SLACK. 
GEORGE E. NEWCOMB 
AMMIEL COLMAN. 
ROBERT A. YERXA. 



WEIGHERS OF COAL. 

D. WARNER DANFORTH. 



THADDEUS HARRINGTON, 
CLINTON E. SOMES. 
EDWARD L. DUxNNING. 
WILLIAM I. NEWCOMB. 
SIDNEY E. HAYDEN. 
IRWIN L. S-MITH. 



^VEIGHERS OF BEEF. 
D. WARNER DANFORTH. THADDEUS HARRINGTON, 



CHARLES H. TUCKER. 
FREDERICK A. CEILING. 
CLARENCE EDW^ARDS. 



GEORGE K. WALCOTT. 
GEORGE E. SLACK. 
CLINTON E. SOMES. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



MELVILLE C. 
ROBERT R. PERRY, Captain. 
CHRIS. C. CAVANAGH, Sergt. 
EUGENE A. CARTER, Sergt. 
JOHN E. FULLER. 
ALBION L. STAPLES. 
JUDSON W. OLIVER. 
GEORGE W. BEAN. 
GEORGE L. SMITH. 
EDW^ARD M. CARTER. 
JOHN F. JOHNSON. 
EDWARD E. HAMBLEN. 

WOODMAN. 

KEATING. 
SMITH. 

GAM.MON. 



CHARLES E 
ARTHUR E. 
STEPHEN S 
EUGENE H. 



IRA S. CARLTON. 
CHARLES W. STEVENS. 
ULYSSES G. SKINNER. 
JAMES J. POLLARD. 
SAMUEL BURNS. 



PARKHURST, Chief. 

EDWARD McGARR, Sergt. 
DENNIS KELLEY, Sergt. 
PHINEAS W. SKINNER. 
SAMUEL A. BROW^N. 
JOHN HAFFORD. 
GEORGE A. BODGE. 
GEORGE H. CARLETON. 
HUBERT H. MILLER. 
FRANCIS A. PERKINS. 
CHARLES S. THRASHER. 
WILLIAM H. JOHNSTON. 
JOHN G. KNIGHT. 
THEODORE E. HERON. 
JACOB W. SKINNER. 
DAVID A. BOLTON. 
JAMES M. HARMON. 
MICHAEL T. KENNEDY. 
EZRA A. DODGE. 
DANIEL G. SIMONS. 
FRED H. GOOGINS. 



JOTHAM CHISHOLM. 
MELVILLE C. PARKHURST, Lockup Keeper. 



630 ANNUAL REPORTS. 



MEETINGS. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 
Second and fourth Wednesday evenings of each month. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



Thursday evenings next following the second and fourth Wednesdays 

of each month. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
Last Monday evening of each month. 



INDEX. 



Board of Health, report of ... . 

City Clerk, report of ..... 

City Engineer, report of . 

City Government, Committees and Officers for 1894 

City Government, Committees and Officers for 1895 

City Physician, report of . 

City Solicitor, report of ... . 

City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes, report of 
Electric Lines, Superintendent of, report of 
Engineer of the Pumping Station, report of, 
Fire Department, Chief Engineer of, report of 
Fire Department, Committee on, report of 
Fuel and Street Lights, Committee on, report of 
Highways, Committee on, report of . 
Inspector of Buildings, report of 
Inspector of Milk, report of . . . 
Inspector of Animals and Provisions, report of 
Jury List ....... 

Lights, Superintendent of, report of . 

Mayor's Inaugural Address for 1894 . 

Mayor's Inaugural Address for 1895 . 

Meetings of the City Council and School Committee 

Ordinances ...... 

Overseers of the Poor, report of 
Public Buildings, Superintendent of, report of 
Public Library, Trustees of, report of 
Public Library, Librarian, report of . 
Public Property, Committee on, report of . 
School Committee, report of . . • 

Schools, Superintendent of, report of. 
Sealer of Weights and Measures, report of 
Sewers, Committee on, report of 
Somerville Mystic Water Board, report of 
Water Works, Superintendent of, report of 



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630 
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